Quartet Diminished – Station Two [Hermes Records 2018]

Review + short interview with Ehsan Sadig

Italian version below

My goal was to form a band with musicians with different backgrounds and tastes. As a guitar player progressive and metal music have influenced me most. Our drummer, Rouzbeh Fadavi, comes from more jazzy background, our pianist, Mazyar Younesi, is graduated in classical music and also a conductor, and our woodwind player, Soheil Peyghambari, has more folk music background. Ehsan Sadigh, guitarist and one of the founders of Teheran based Quartet Diminished, points very clearly in his words at what were his purposes since the start of his band. Different identities collide in four different people’ backgrounds, western and eastern cultures clash, electric clashes with acoustic, Iranian classical clashes with western jazz and metal. Quartet Diminished is first and foremost a battle scene, where notes, modes, rhythms bring their history in and meet.

But wouldn’t this mix of influences risk to fall into chaos? Musicologist Carl Dalhaus once told that we should not talk about ‘identities’ in music, better to use the word ‘Wesen‘. The translation of this german term might be ‘being’, or better ‘consciousness of being’. When human beings are born, they gradually start creating their consciousness by difference: I am not the world outside [Marcello Sorce Keller Identities in traditional and western musics in Enciclopedia della Musica, Il Sole 24 Ore]. An identity is built upon a difference with other identities. This approach applied to music hints at how every culture might be seen as a separate from another. In the speed of light collapsing universe of today’s music cultures, bringing together the more distant sounds is becoming the rule. And the result is often a chaos producing system of multiple influences blended together. But is mixing cultures creating a new identity or is it just a plain juxtapositions of sounds? From my point of view as listener, I appreciate when the culture clashing process creates new identities. If you are looking for this option as well, then put Quartet Diminished on the top of your wishlist.

Take the sixteen minutes of Cluster, third track of their 2018 effort Station Two. While the length might surely appeal progressive rock fans, this is not exactly a typical ‘prog epic’, nor a classical suite. But something that fits in the middle. The slightly disturbing repetitions of piano intro’s power chords pave the road for the drums and guitar’ grandeur metal entry. Piano and bass clarinet answers back each distorted chord, but there’s not time left to start the headbanging. A sudden interruption places the piano back in. Younesi initiates a rubato dialogue with Peyghambari‘s saxophone with a sort of dorian mode feeling. An unison cascading line played by piano and guitar falls at the moment when the bass clarinet and drums may start back the sound and fury.

These frequent start and stops are the core of Quartet Diminished‘s music, thanks to the unique approach of the only single rhythmic element of the band, the drummer Rouzbeh Fadavi. A disquieting sense of disruption of our concept of the uninterrupted standard western song. If we take the perspective of traditional Iranian classical music and the music system of the avaz, which is based on the sequences of different moods and modes -to roughly translate that, then this structure seems no wonder. Ehsan Sadig offers his point of view on the traditional Iranian music: The influence of Iranian rhythms and melodies has precipitated in our subconscious somehow. Therefore, we don’t use them deliberately in many occasions, they just penetrate in our music in a subtle way. Coming back to the point of Cluster we left off, the rhythmic section in 3+3+3+2 first explodes vigorously, then placidly moves back to intro theme, while Ehsan Sadig plays shrilling bendings over a phrygian traditional scale. Suddenly piano’s descending rumblings move the atmosphere to a rondo-style -with the absence of the drums- that morphs in an intricate 5+3+4 jazz-rock rhythmic section. When the drum enters again in, Peyghambari is left the space to fill with his intense and prolonged folk echoes. If we ever looked for a definition of Cluster, then this might be: a chamber electro-acoustic suite played by traditionally influenced progressive musicians [!]. 

Quartet Diminished are now approaching their second release, but their roots are in the initial line-up for the release as trio earlier in 2013. As Ehsan Sadig tells me: Our first band was called ‘Whisper’, including drums (Rouzbeh), Guitar (Me) and bass (Nima). When the bass player left the band, I decided to replace it with saxophone (Parviz). Diminished was the name of my first released album. Ending up being released under the name of Ehsan Sadig Trio, Diminished is a distinctive sound album: traditional music played in a ritual-like context. Instruments alternate often in solo or duos throughout the release, the rests are frequently taking the scene more than the music itself. A subtle sense of tension pervades this work, while guitar is not necessarily playing always and everywhere. With the entrance of new members, the project slightly changed its sound: Mazyar Younesi (pianist and conductor) joined the band shortly after Parviz (sax player) left the band, so I decided to make a new quartet band. Then Peter Soleimanipour joined the quartet as woodwind player and the first album of quartet diminished (Station One) got released. Published by Hermes records in 2015, Station One is an intricate rhythms shift and a leap forward in their music making. While polyrhythmic layers blink at postminimal european bands such as Nik Bärtsch, the sounds are taking nourishment from multiple sources at once, thanks also to the decision to make their project unique with no bass instrument. Traditional music, classical, jazz: Station One is taking the roads of unexpectedness. After Peter left the quartet, Soheil Peyghambari joined us as our new woodwind player about 2 years ago and with the new lineup the second album of Quartet Diminished (Station Two)

The eponymous track opening Station Two is already a showcase of how these multiple sources of influence may collide and meet. After Ehsan Sadig‘s scratching on guitar strings collapses in all-band avant-like noise, then the guitarist creates a groove with a simple hypnotic repetition of a single note. The tap-your-feet pattern that follows is enriched by Soheil Peyghambari‘s deep bass clarinet, that is easy to compare to the rhythmic efforts by swiss Sha. And then it breaks in a stopping tension opening for piano solo: slowly built around jazz and traditional music atmospheres, it moves in a similar direction to what others, such like Tigran Hamasyan, are doing by mixing western and eastern traditions in the contemporary context. The grand finale with its long and aggressive notes repeated by whole band,comes again after a pause. Tension and sudden rests: those are the rules in Quartet Diminished music. They are always looking at managing the tension of the track in some way in between traditional ritual and western avantgarde music. Ehsan puts it in very easy manner: Iranian folk music is one of our influences since the Iranian ritual music is a branch of Iranian folk music more or less, and we’ve heard those melodies and ballads from our early childhood via media and etc..

The following track, Zone, has even more metal chamber moments for Ehsan Sadig to show his wide array of techniques. Ranging from palm muted to power chord, tapping and sweep picking arpeggios, his efforts are never appearing as effortless virtuoso exhibitionism. The initial drum rolling -which incidentally Sadig indicates as having been inspired by a kurdish rhythm- works as the preparation for the subsequent polyrhythmic layering between piano playing in a 12 on 4 feeling and guitar following a 3+4+3+4+3+4 pattern. Quartet Diminished are frequently working with slow intertwining tempos, which seems to let more easily explode the thrilling solos by Sadig on guitar or the folk embellished lyrical melodies by Peyghambari

Moving through more pensive atmospheres, Mood II morphs in a Bärtsch-like ritual pattern after 5 minutes of dialogue between clarinet and guitar sustained by piano’s repeated chords. Then eventually explodes in a sort of orchestral finale via an ascending scale that liquefies the listener’s tension in a peaceful joy. Quartet Diminished alternates moments of improvisation to strictly written materials, often exposing it to multiple layers: Each track of ours is a result of a different procedure more or less, sometimes we extract the ideas from our improvises and then fix them by writing them. In other occasion, one of us might bring a written idea or phrase of his, then this written part will blend with improvises, individual ideas and transforms to a new creation which belongs to all of us. The closing Mood I is an ecstatic classical guitar work of art, we might find references someway in the Arabian music that influenced Spanish classical music. Clarinet is joining Sadig‘s delightful tunes in such a delicate manner that, when Younesi‘s lyrical voice enters in, it is almost impossible to distinguish each of them. They are moving us to an heavenly place we would like to sit in for the longest time possible.

Stations Two is a statement of identity from a band that moves in a unforeseen territory crossing avantgarde, ritual music, chamber orchestra and even metal and prog. Not a surprise that these guys are attracting the interest of so many fine producers such as Manfred Eicher or Leonardo Pavkovic. They are moving us in a modern ritual, a conscious and respectful ritual of the dialogue between multiple identities, that look at melting in a new identity.

Quartet Diminished
Station Two

1. Station Two
2. Zone
3. Cluster
4. Mood II
5. Projector
6. Mood I

Ehsan Sadig – electric guitar
Mazyar Younesi – piano, voice
Soheil Peyghambari – clarinet, bass clarinet, soprano saxophone
Rouzbeh Fadavi – drums

Hermes Records
http://www.hermesrecords.com/en/Ensembles/Diminished

Versione in italiano

Il mio obiettivo era formare una band con musicisti con background e gusti diversi. Come chitarrista, il progressive e la musica metal mi hanno influenzato di più. Il nostro batterista, Rouzbeh Fadavi, proviene da un ambiente più jazzistico, il nostro pianista, Mazyar Younesi, ha un diploma in musica classica ed è anche direttore d’orchestra, e il nostro fiatista, Soheil Peyghambari, viene da esperienze con la musica folk. Ehsan Sadigh, chitarrista e uno dei fondatori della band di Teheran Quartet Diminished, sottolinea molto chiaramente nelle sue parole cosa stava cercando sin dalla fondazione della sua band. Identità diverse si scontrano in quattro contesti diversi, si scontrano culture occidentali e orientali, l’elettrico che si scontra con l’acustico, musica classica iraniana con il jazz e il metal occidentali. Quartet Diminished è prima di tutto una battaglia, in cui note, modi, ritmi portano la loro storia e si incontrano.

Ma tutto questo incrocio di influenze non rischia di finire nel caos? Il musicologo Carl Dalhaus una volta disse che non dovevamo parlare di “identità” nella musica, ma era meglio usare la parola “Wesen“. La traduzione di questo termine tedesco potrebbe essere “essere”, o meglio “coscienza dell’essere”. Quando gli esseri umani nascono, gradualmente iniziano a creare la loro coscienza attraverso la differenziazione: io non sono il mondo esterno [Marcello Sorce Keller Identità nelle musiche tradizionali ed occidentali in Enciclopedia della Musica, Il Sole 24 Ore]. Un’identità si basa su una differenza con altre identità. Questo approccio applicato alla musica indica perché é possibile parlare di una cultura differenziata da un’altra. Nell’universo delle culture musicali di oggi, che collassano alla velocità della luce, riunire le sonorità più distanti da un punto di vista geografico o sociale sta diventando la regola. E il risultato è spesso un sistema che produce un caos di molteplici influenze mescolate insieme. Ma mescolare le culture significa creare una nuova identità o è solo una giusta giustapposizione di suoni? Dal mio punto di vista di ascoltatore, amo quando il processo di contrasto culturale crea nuove identità. Se é questo che state cercando, allora mettete i Quartet Diminished in cima alla vostra lista.

Prendiamo i sedici minuti di Cluster, terza traccia da Station Two del 2018. La lunghezza potrebbe sicuramente attrarre i fan del progressive rock, ma questa non è esattamente un prog epic, e neanche una suite da musica classica. Ma qualcosa che sta nel mezzo. Le ripetizioni inquietanti dei power chords di piano lasciano spazio all’intro di batteria e chitarra dal sapore di grandeur metal. Il clarinetto basso ed il pianoforte rispondono a ogni accordo distorto, ma non c’é tempo per iniziare l’headbanging. Un’improvvisa interruzione dà spazio improvvisamente al pianoforte. Younesi avvia un dialogo in rubato con il sassofono di Peyghambari ed i due galleggiano attorno al modo dorico. Una linea all’unisono tra piano e chitarra discende a cascata nel momento in cui il clarinetto basso e la batteria ricominciano a battere ad un ritmo infernale.

Queste frequenti pause e ripartenze sono il cuore della musica dei Quartet Diminished, grazie all’approccio unico del solo elemento ritmico della band, il batterista Rouzbeh Fadavi. Avvertiamo un inquietante senso di rottura del nostro concetto della canzone occidentale standard, abituati come siamo allo sviluppo ininterrotto del pezzo. Se consideriamo, invece, la prospettiva della musica classica iraniana classica e del sistema musicale dell’avaz, che si basa sulle sequenze di diversi stati d’animo e modi -per tradurre questo concetto in maniera veramente approssimativa, allora questa struttura non sembra sorprendente. Ehsan Sadig offre il suo punto di vista sulla musica tradizionale iraniana: L’influenza dei ritmi e delle melodie iraniani è in qualche modo precipitata nel nostro subconscio. Quindi, non li usiamo deliberatamente in molte occasioni, semplicemente penetrano nella nostra musica in modo sottile. Ritornando al punto di Cluster dove avevamo interrotto, una sezione ritmica in tempi composti da 3 + 3 + 3 + 2 esplode vigorosamente, poi torna placidamente al tema di introduzione, mentre Ehsan Sadig emette alcuni bending lancinanti su una scala tradizionale frigia. All’improvviso i turbinii discendenti del pianoforte spostano l’atmosfera verso uno stile rondò, con l’assenza della batteria, che si trasforma in una intricata sezione ritmica jazz-rock in tempi di 5 + 3 + 4. Quando la batteria entra di nuovo, a Peyghambari è lasciato uno spazio che può riempire con i suoi echi folk intensi e prolungati. Se mai avessimo cercato una definizione di Cluster, potrebbe essere: una suite elettroacustica da camera suonata da musicisti progressive influenzati dalla musica tradizionale [!].

I Quartet Diminished sono al loro secondo album, ma le loro radici risalgono alla line-up iniziale che all’inizio del 2013 ha pubblicato un disco precedente sotto diverso nome. Come Ehsan Sadig mi dice: Il nostro primo gruppo si chiamava “Whisper”, ed includeva  batteria (Rouzbeh), chitarra (Me) e basso (Nima). Quando il bassista ha lasciato la band ho deciso di sostituirlo con il sassofono (Parviz). Diminished era il nome del mio primo album pubblicato. Pubblicato, infine, con il nome di Ehsan Sadig Trio, Diminished è un album dal suono distinto ed unico: la musica tradizionale eseguita in un contesto da rituale. Gli strumenti si alternano in solo o in duetto, le pause spesso prendono la scena più della musica stessa. Un sottile senso di tensione pervade questo lavoro, mentre la chitarra non é necessariamente presente sempre e ovunque. Con l’ingresso di nuovi membri, il progetto ha leggermente modificato le sue sonorità: Mazyar Younesi (pianista e direttore d’orchestra) si è unito alla band poco dopo che Parviz (sassofonista) ha lasciato la band, così ho deciso di creare una nuova band in quartetto. Quindi Peter Soleimanipour si é unito al gruppo come fiatista e il primo album del Quartet Diminished (Station One) é stato pubblicato. Prodotto da Hermes Records nel 2015, Station One è un intricato cambio di ritmi e un salto in avanti nella loro produzione musicale. Mentre i livelli poliritmici fanno l’occhiolino ad artisti postminimali europei come Nik Bärtsch, le sonorità si nutrono da più fonti contemporaneamente, grazie anche all’unicità del suono della sezione ritmica priva di basso. Musica tradizionale, classica, jazz: Station One percorre strade imprevedibili. Dopo che Peter lasciò il quartetto, Soheil Peyghambari si unì a noi come nostro nuovo fiatista circa 2 anni fa e con la nuova formazione abbiamo prodotto il secondo album di Quartet Diminished (Station Two).

La traccia omonima che apre Station Two è già una vetrina di come queste molteplici influenze possano scontrarsi e incontrarsi. Dopo che Ehsan Sadig graffia il plettro sulle corde della chitarra, tutto crolla in un rumoristico avantgarde di tutta la band ed il chitarrista crea un groove con una semplice ripetizione ipnotica di una singola nota. Il pattern cadenzato che segue è arricchito dal profondo clarinetto basso di Soheil Peyghambari, che è facile confrontare l’arte ritmica dello svizzero Sha. E poi il pezzo si interrompe in un’apertura di tensione per favorire l’assolo di piano: costruito lentamente tra jazz e atmosfere di musica tradizionale, il solo si muove in una direzione simile a quella che altri, come Tigran Hamasyan, stanno facendo mescolando tradizioni occidentali e orientali nel contesto contemporaneo. Il gran finale con le sue note lunghe e aggressive ripetute da tutta la band, arriva di nuovo dopo una pausa. Tensione e pause improvvise: quelle sono le regole della musica dei Quartet Diminished. Provano sempre a gestire la tensione della traccia in qualche modo tra musica tradizionale rituale e avanguardia occidentale. Ehsan lo indica in modo molto semplice: La musica folk iraniana è una delle nostre influenze dal momento che la musica rituale iraniana è un ramo della musica popolare iraniana più o meno, e abbiamo ascoltato quelle melodie e ballate della nostra prima infanzia tramite media ed ecc..

La traccia seguente, Zone, ha ancora più momenti da metal cameristico, che permettono ad Ehsan Sadig di mostrare la sua vasta gamma di tecniche. Dal palm muting ai power chords, tapping ed arpeggi in sweep, le sue esplosioni non appaiono mai come esibizioni di virtuosismo fini a loro stesse. L’iniziale pattern della batteria – che per inciso Sadig indica essere stata ispirata da un ritmo curdo- fa da preparazione per la successiva stratificazione poliritmica tra il piano che suona in un 12/4 e la chitarra che segue con i tempi in 3 + 4 + 3 + 4 + 3 + 4. I Quartet Diminished frequentemente lavorano con tempi che si intrecciano lentamente, che sembra far esplodere più facilmente gli assoli elettrizzanti di Sadig alla chitarra o le melodie impreziosite di lirismo di Peyghambari.

Passando attraverso atmosfere più pensose e sospese, Mood II si trasforma in un pattern rituale simile alla musica di Bärtsch dopo 5 minuti di dialogo tra clarinetto e chitarra sostenuti dagli accordi ripetuti del pianoforte. Infine esplode in una sorta di finale orchestrale attraverso una scala ascendente che liquefa la tensione dell’ascoltatore in una gioia estatica. I Quartet Diminished alternano momenti di improvvisazione a sezioni rigorosamente scritte, spesso esponendole a più livelli: Ogni nostra traccia è il risultato di una procedura diversa, più o meno, a volte estraiamo le idee dalle nostre improvvisazioni e poi le fissiamo scrivendole. In altre occasioni, uno di noi porta un’idea scritta o un suo tema, quindi questa parte scritta si fonde con improvvisazioni, idee individuali e si trasforma in una nuova creazione che appartiene a tutti noi. La traccia Mood I di chiusura è un piccolo capolavoro di estatica chitarra classica, dove potremmo trovare riferimenti in qualche modo nella musica araba che ha influenzato la musica classica spagnola. Il clarinetto si unisce alle incantevoli linee di Sadig in un modo così delicato che, quando entra la voce lirica di Younesi, è quasi impossibile distinguere i tre. Ci stiamo spostando in un luogo paradisiaco in cui vorremmo rimanere il più a lungo possibile.

Stations Two è una dichiarazione di identità di una band che si muove in un territorio sconosciuto mischiando avanguardia, musica rituale, orchestra da camera e persino metal e prog. Non sorprende scoprire che questi musicisti attraggano l’interesse di produttori come Manfred Eicher o Leonardo Pavkovic. Ci trasportano in un rituale moderno, un rituale consapevole e rispettoso del dialogo tra identità multiple, che si fondono idealmente in un’identità nuova.

Quartet Diminished
Station Two

1. Station Two
2. Zone
3. Cluster
4. Mood II
5. Projector
6. Mood I

Ehsan Sadig – chitarra elettrica
Mazyar Younesi – piano, voce
Soheil Peyghambari – clarinetto, clarinetto basso, sax soprano
Rouzbeh Fadavi – batteria

Hermes Records
http://www.hermesrecords.com/en/Ensembles/Diminished

Annunci

Autore: Marcello Nardi

markellosnardoi ET yahoo DOT it

Rispondi

Inserisci i tuoi dati qui sotto o clicca su un'icona per effettuare l'accesso:

Logo WordPress.com

Stai commentando usando il tuo account WordPress.com. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Google+ photo

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Google+. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Foto Twitter

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Twitter. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Foto di Facebook

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Facebook. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

w

Connessione a %s...