Troot – Constance and the Waiting [2018] pt.1

Interviews with Troot members from April to August 2018

Second part
Italian version below

Some years ago I was invited by a friend at a dinner in a fancy high-profile restaurant in Milan. Purpose of the event was not quite eating, but cooking for others, even though none there was even an amateur cook. I was thrown in a company of strangers, whom I soon understood were high potential fast-riser young managers, for playing a serious game to test our skills of team working. As soon as we were divided in teams and commissioned to create a menu for guests at our own will, we were to play our management skills and show how good we were at working with others. But only egos emerged. People started approaching others in a grandstanding fashion, with alpha dogs communication styles, speaking up, and finally the room’s heat turning up. Then all of a sudden everything fixed, everybody calmly matching work duties. How was that magic happening? I slowly grasped it happened as a seasoned quiet man sat at the end of the table where all of us we were working aside. He had silently set the rules, facilitated assignment of tasks, restored the focus on purpose. I afterward acknowledged his effort and understood how he played such an important and reserved role by coordinating everyone.

When I had chance to meet with TROOT members -a large ensemble consisting in ten out of boundaries musicians coming each from such diverse backgrounds- this memory resonated to me. In October 2017 Tim Root and Steve Ball gathered musicians that have barely known each other before to the cozy and reserved Bear Creek studios, near Seattle, to play 40 minutes of unpublished, highly structured and falling outside of easy labeling music composed by Root himself. They were to spend 3 days immersed to arrange, play and record music requiring highly demanding effort. The challenges of so diverse people sitting in the same room for playing such demanding music were the highest. No surprise that Beth Fleenor, clarinetist and vocalist, remembers the initial challenges through this metaphor: When it started it looked like a busy kitchen in a fantastic restaurant preparing an incredible meal, where everybody jumps in and there are people preparing thing, people seasoning thing, people managing the grill and people managing salads and desserts. And it all comes out of the kitchen and it looks just beautiful and tastes delicious and you don’t see the chaos and the compression that was happening behind it, but if feels like something much bigger than its indivudal parts. We are a good kitchen team!

Constance and the Waiting, the outcome coming off from these sessions, is an exquisite menu of star chefs-made recipes that wheats the appetites of tasters looking for highly complex music as well as pure melodic delicacy, always looking at the past with a flavor of something you haven’t heard exactly before, perfectly balancing a mixture of ingredients. Where flavors sometimes point to classic prog Keith Emerson or King Crimson’s Red or ThraK or to avant-prog efforts or to 19th century classical music and even serial music, this is not a dish you tasted ever before. Echoing Julie Slick‘s words: it is very complex, heady, very proggy, very classical, chamber, fusion, chamber prog! The line-up is built around composer and piano player Tim Root, who is always there through all the recording. Around him a crowd of three guitarists so different each one from the other: Bill Horist, Alex Anthony Faide and Steve Ball. Then let’s the orchestral section in, or like Tim Root indicates ‘The Section’, with Nora Germain at violin, Amy Denio at saxophones and Beth Flenoor at clarinets. Last but not least the rhythm section, elongated at two basses, Julie Slick and Marco Machera, plus Alessandro Inolti at drum stole, the last three representing EchoTest band in full force.

It all started when Tim Root got in contact with Steve Ball, who says: Tim sent me an email in Oct 2016 and we are old friends, we go back to the mid-nineties to the real time that we met in the Seattle area. In addition to being famous among King Crimson‘s fanbase for having recreated current Discipline logo -notably you can see that on latest On and the Off the Road boxset, Steve Ball is a guitarist and a point of reference in Seattle area for his work in Fripp’s Guitar Craft workshops since the very start in the 80’s, having founded local Guitar Craft circle, and for working with improvisation in large ensembles, namely with Tiny Orchestral Moments. The idea was to take the kinds of interactions and structures about working together in large ensembles and to apply them to the six compositions that Tim had been working on. I pulled some headphones and I listened to the pieces. As each one flew by, I walked up more and more to the idea how insane it would be to trying get any humans to play this music. How amazing it would be if we got some world class players, who might just take a leap of faith, take on the insanity of this music and make it happen together in a compact super-accelerated format by living together, rehearsing together, recording together. I essentially said ‘yes I love this music and let’s find a way to pull the other team to make this happen’!

steve_proj_3_029_highres

The two became the men setting the purposes, taking care of the selection of the members and the glue of the team. Tim RootSteve as a facilitator of collaborations is in my opinion without peer. He took this group of people, most whom had not met. I knew four or five people, but none knew everyone. We took this group of people who had never played together and Steve immediately established the right ground rules that would allow us to remove all the tension. This made everything possible. This is his magic. I think more than anything else Steve is a fantastic musician, a great friend and all the other great things he does, but as a facilitator of collaboration he is just without peer. He just opened up everybody. This was very hard what we were trying to do. The music is challenging we had a very short timeframe. You had to set your ego aside and just figure it out, do the work and we worked very long days. We were exhausted by the time it was over. We became a family so quickly. Putting together an heterogeneous band was quite the strength and not the weakness of the project. So Julie Slick was approached by Steve Ball during Tiny Orchestral Moments‘ rehearsals, immediately after Three of a Perfect Pair camp [in August 2017] and she was able to bring her fellows in as well: he [Steve] asked me if I could recommend a drummer for Troot project and I already knew that EchoTest was going to be playing shows in East coast. So we are already arranging the tour and we have Alessandro playing drums for that. And when it turned out that Marco Machera was available to support the project recording as he was in Seattle as well, they wanted him in as well. 

Axe from the Frozen Sea Within is a perfect showcase of what this ensemble can do when stepping on the throttle. The band at full beats two thundering major chords placed at a distance of an unexpected third minor and enriched by powerful augmented 5ths and added on occasional 4ths on the bass, until it modulates twice up a third in a peaceful mood. It all prepares for the unison proggy theme in 7 played by piano first and then by all instruments. They alternate playing this theme in multiple variations on the lower and higher register as it progresses in a minor cadence. The rising tension erupts in a complicate theme full of big leaps through complicated intervals that almost brings my memory in with the funky efforts by Italian ensemble SlivovitzThat’s almost serial. I think there’s one note in there I decided to change, but that line is serial, that’s a dodecaphonic line, I think diminished chords, Tim Root explains. It all clashes in prolonged plateau on chords that seem to avoid any cadence, while Alessandro Inolti‘s powerful hitting is absent. Finally a new theme comes in with the band now back at full force: rhythmic guitars play a two-chord riff in 6 while piano, second guitar and rest of the instruments counterpoint it with an ecstatic driving punch that hints clearly at King Crimson‘s Lark’s Tongues in Aspic. Tim RootThe title of the first track, Axe from the Frozen Sea Within, it is a Kafka’s quote. The full quote is ‘A book must be the axe for the frozen sea within us’. When I came across the quote, it resonated to me, because what I think I found out in this album is my voice, finally. 

Tim Root might be unknown for progressive rock fans, mostly because he is holding a wealth of experience in the composing, conducting and sound designing for classical music first. With a past education in composition by some of the mavericks of the avant garde, he also received piano instruction from a student of Rachmaninoff. Not a surprise since the 19th century piano music is a clear influence in all Troot‘s Constance and the Waiting. But the surprise comes when he indicates two among most important guitarists as his epiphanies: I think more interesting is that at some point my playing began to take influence more of guitar players. I went to college in 1981. In that year two albums came out, one was King Crimson’s Discipline and the other was Fred Frith’s Speechless, one of two Frith’s early solo albums. Both albums affected me as a musicians. 

Constance and the Waiting is an overcomposed multilayered effort, which might hardly be brought as an example of the current status of improvisation. Still improvisation was kind of the ghost in the room during the sessions. When asked about where this record would stay in an ideal line where at one end there’s complete writing and the other free improvisation, Tim Root explains more why he was so influenced by Fripp and FrithSpeechless [by Fred Frith] is much more improvisatory, much more open, much more free jazz. And then you got the discipline of Discipline [featuring Robert Fripp]. Both things really affected me at exact the right time. I wanted to put a group of players able to play both. To play all this free improvisatory music that Fred Frith was writing and play all this disciplined music that Fripp was doing. There are two different schools of improvisation for these players [Troot players] as well, and the group is really split down the middle. There are free improvisers like myself, Beth Flenoor, Amy Denio, who will just sit and play -and Bill Horist as well. We would just sit and play completely free. I think about the other improvisers, Julie Slick, Steve Ball, Marco Machera and Alex Anthony Faide that their type of improvisation is a different approach. Steve talks a lot about improvisation that sounded like written music and written music that sounds like improvisations. I am playing with that idea as well. Layered on the top of that, the improvisation came more from knowing I had players who knew how to listen carefully and determine the right part, because the arrangements were figured out organically as a group.

steve_proj_3_044

Another maverick, this time the progressive rock legend Keith Emerson, played a huge influence in Tim Root‘s life: I heard Emerson, Lake and Palmer’s triple live album Welcome Back my Friends when I was in 8th grade, at exactly the right moment. I was 14 yrs old. He [Emerson] plays for 3 hrs long and he makes two mistakes! How do you do that? There’s two errors in there somewhere. Keith was from another planet. That was entirely another level of ‘How my God how do you do that?’. The fierce and exploding scales up and down at start of Dance Elena are the perfect tribute to the Emerson, Lake and Palmer. Root exploits such an urgent groove on each key of the piano that he seems to quote closely the inner sense of driving that Emerson was imprinting at each note he played. Two rounds on a crazy roller coaster in the same theme, the second time the melody transposed an half step higher and then modulating up, as Tim Root analyzes. The main theme of this track goes long by in the past, more precisely composed 17 years ago. All members play what is probably their most virtuoso outcome in the overall album, while the mood moves seamlessly from driving rhythmic power chords by guitars to funny theatrical back-and-forths between the members, all played at crazy speed of light.

Troot
Constance and the Waiting
1. Axe for the Frozen Sea Within
2. Dance Elena
3. Palasidai
4. Venice of the Sky
5. Hollow by Footsteps
6. Joey

Steve Ball – acoustic guitar
Amy Denio – saxophone and accordion
Alex Anthony Faide – guitar
Beth Fleenor – clarinets and voice
Nora Germain – violin
Bill Horist – guitar and prepared guitar
Alessandro Inolti – drums
Marco Machera – bass
Tim Root – piano and keyboards
Julie Slick – bass

www.facebook.com/trootmusic/
http://trootmusic.com

Second part

Versione in italiano

Qualche anno fa sono stato invitato da un amico a cena in un ristorante stellato a Milano. Scopo dell’evento non era propriamente una cena, ma cucinare per altri, anche se nessuno dei presenti era nemmeno un cuoco da Masterchef. Sono stato catapultato in una compagnia di estranei, che ho capito presto essere giovani manager rampanti, riuniti li per un gioco seri, ovvero mettere alla prova le capacità di lavorare in team. Dopo esser stati divisi in squadre ed aver ricevuto l’incarico di creare un menu per gli ospiti a nostro piacimento, ognuno doveva mettere a disposizione le proprie capacità manageriali. Ma è emerso solo l’ego degli astanti, tra voglia di mettersi in mostra, comportamenti da maschi alfa, voci che si alzano, così come la temperatura. Poi all’improvviso tutto si è rimesso posto, tutti hanno iniziato a svolgere il loro lavoro. Com’è successa questa magia? L’ho capito ad un certo punto quando ho notato un signore che sedeva alla fine del tavolo dove tutti noi stavamo lavorando. Aveva silenziosamente fissato in silenzio le regole, facilitato l’assegnazione dei compiti, ripristinato l’attenzione sullo scopo del gruppo. In seguito ho riconosciuto il suo impegno e ho capito come aveva svolto un ruolo così importante e riservato coordinando tutti.

Quando ho avuto il piacere di incontrare i membri di Troot – un ensemble formato da dieci musicisti fuori da ogni limite provenienti ognuno da ambienti molto differenti – questo ricordo mi è tornato alla mente. Nell’ottobre del 2017 Tim Root e Steve Ball hanno riunito alcuni musicisti che si conoscevano a malapena negli accoglienti e riservati studi di Bear Creek, vicino a Seattle, per suonare 40 minuti di musica inedita, altamente strutturati e al di fuori di una facile categorizzazione, composta da Root stesso. Dovevano trascorrere 3 giorni immersi per provare, suonare e registrare musica che richiedesse uno sforzo molto impegnativo. La sfida di prendere persone così diverse e farle sedere nella stessa stanza per suonare musica così esigente era molto alta. Non sorprende che Beth Fleenor, clarinettista e cantante, ricordi i momenti attraverso questa metafora: quando abbiamo iniziato sembrava una cucina affollata in un fantastico ristorante che preparava portate incredibile, dove tutti saltano da una parte all’altra. Dove ci sono persone che preparano cose, qualcuno che condisce qualcosa , persone che gestiscono la griglia e persone che gestiscono insalate e dessert. E tutto esce dalla cucina e sembra semplicemente bello e ha un sapore delizioso e non si vede il caos e la compressione che sta succedendo dietro di esso, ma se si sente come qualcosa di molto più grande delle sue parti indivuduali. Siamo una buona squadra da cucina!

Constance and the Waiting, il risultato di queste sessioni, è uno squisito menu di ricette da chef stellato che stimola l’appetito degli assaggiatori alla ricerca di una musica estremamente complessa e di pura delicatezza melodica, guardando sempre al passato con un sapore di qualcosa che non si è sentito esattamente prima, bilanciando perfettamente una miscela di ingredienti variegati. Alcune volte i sapori puntano al classico prog di Keith Emerson o dei King Crimson di Red o THRAK o agli sforzi avant-prog o alla musica classica del XIX secolo e persino alla musica seriale: comunque questo non è un piatto che avrete mai assaggiato. Riprendendo le parole di Julie Slick per definirlo: è molto complesso, cervellotico, molto prog, molto classico, da camera, fusion, un chamber prog! La line-up è costruita attorno al compositore e pianista Tim Root, che è sempre presente in ogni momento. Intorno a lui una folla di tre chitarristi così diversi l’uno dall’altro: Bill Horist, Alex Anthony Faide e Steve Ball. Quindi andiamo alla sezione orchestrale, o come Tim Root indica ‘The Section’, con Nora Germain al violino, Amy Denio ai sassofoni e Beth Flenoor ai clarinetti. E per finire la sezione ritmica, allungata a due bassi, Julie Slick e Marco Machera, più Alessandro Inolti alla stola di batteria, ovvero tutti e tre gli EchoTest.

Tutto è iniziato quando Tim Root ha contattato Steve Ball, che racconta: Tim mi ha mandato una mail a ottobre 2016. Siamo vecchi amici, da metà degli anni ’90 al tempo in cui ci siamo conosciuti a Seattle. Oltre ad essere famoso tra i fan di King Crimson per aver ricreato l’attuale logo di Discipline –è possibile vederlo nella copertina del box On e Off the Road, Steve Ball è un chitarrista e un punto di riferimento nell’area di Seattle per il suo lavoro nel Guitar Craft fin dagli inizi con Robert Fripp, per aver fondato il circolo locale del Guitar Craft e per aver lavorato con l’improvvisazione in grandi ensemble, in particolare con i Tiny Orchestral Moments. L’idea era di prendere il tipo di interazioni e strutture che utilizzavamo per lavorare insieme in grandi ensemble e applicarle alle sei composizioni su cui Tim stava lavorando. Ho preso le cuffie e ho ascoltato i pezzi. Mentre scorrevano, mi sono avvicinato sempre più all’idea di quanto sarebbe stato folle tentare di far suonare questa musica a qualsiasi essere umano. Sarebbe stato incredibile se avessimo avuto musicisti di livello mondiale, che avrebbero semplicemente potuto crederci, affrontare la follia di questa musica e farla accadere insieme in un contesto super accelerato, compatto, vivendo insieme, provando insieme, registrando insieme. In sostanza ho detto “Sì, amo questa musica e troviamo un modo per convincere la squadra a farlo accadere”!

steve_proj_3_029_highres

I due sono diventati gli uomini che guidavano il gruppo, curando la selezione dei musicisti e tenendo insieme la squadra. Tim Root: Steve come facilitatore è secondo me senza pari. Ha preso questo gruppo di persone, molte delle quali non si erano incontrate. Conoscevo quattro o cinque persone, ma nessuno conosceva nessuno. Abbiamo preso questo gruppo di persone che non avevano mai suonato insieme e Steve ha immediatamente stabilito le giuste regole di base, che ci avrebbero permesso di rimuovere tutta la tensione. Questo ha reso tutto possibile. Questa è la sua magia. Penso che più di ogni altra cosa Steve sia un musicista fantastico, un grande amico e tutte le altre grandi cose che fa, ma come facilitatore è senza pari. Ha fatto in modo che tutti si aprissero. È stato molto difficile quello che stavamo cercando di fare. La musica è difficile, avevamo un tempo molto breve. Dovevi mettere da parte il tuo ego e capirlo, fare il lavoro e abbiamo lavorato per giornate molto lunghe. Eravamo esausti al momento in cui era finita. Siamo diventati una famiglia così rapidamente. Mettere insieme una band eterogenea è stata la forza e non la debolezza del progetto. Julie Slick è stata contattata da Steve Ball durante le prove dei Tiny Orchestral Moments, subito dopo il camp dei Three of a Perfect Pair [ad agosto 2017] ed anche lei è stata in grado di coinvolgere altri: [Steve] mi ha chiesto se potevo raccomandare un batterista per il progetto Troot e sapevo già che EchoTest avrebbe suonato in spettacoli nella costa orientale. Stavano già organizzando il tour ed avevamo Alessandro che suonava la batteria. E quando è venuto fuori che Marco Machera era disponibile anche lui perché era a Seattle con gli altri due, anche lui è entrato a farne parte.

Axe for the Frozen Sea Within è una perfetta dimostrazione di ciò che questo ensemble può fare quando preme sull’acceleratore. La band al completo batte due tonanti accordi maggiori messi alla distanza di un inattesa terza minore e arricchiti da potenti quinte ed aggiunte con 4 seconde sul basso, fino a quando non modula due volte una terza in alto in una pace liberatoria. Tutto si prepara per il tema all’unisono che batte in 7, suonato prima dal piano e poi da tutti gli strumenti. Si alternano giocando su questo tema in più varianti sul registro inferiore e superiore mentre si procede in una cadenza minore. La crescente tensione esplode in un tema complicato, pieno di grandi balzi attraverso intervalli complicati,che quasi mi riporta alla memoria con il funky dell’ensemble italiano Slivovitz. È quasi seriale. Penso che ci sia una nota fuori che ho deciso di cambiare, ma quella linea è seriale, quella è una linea dodecafonica, penso che siano accordi diminuiti, spiega Tim Root. Tutto collassa in un prolungato plateau su accordi che sembrano evitare cadenze, mentre la batteria potente di Alessandro Inolti è assente. Finalmente arriva un nuovo tema con la band tornata a piena forza: le chitarre ritmiche suonano un riff su due accordi in 6 mentre il piano, la seconda chitarra e il resto degli strumenti fanno da contrappunto con un piglio estatico che allude chiaramente a Lark’s Tongues in Aspic dei King Crimson. Tim Root: il titolo della prima traccia, Axe for the Frozen Sea Within, è una citazione di Kafka. La citazione completa è “Un libro deve essere l’ascia per il mare ghiacciato dentro di noi”. Quando ho trovato la citazione, mi è venuta in mente, perché quello che penso di aver trovato in questo album è la mia voce, finalmente.

Tim Root potrebbe essere sconosciuto per i fan del progressive rock, soprattutto perché ha una vasta esperienza nella composizione, direzione e sound design nell’ambito della musica classica principalmente. Dopo aver studiato composizione con alcuni dei maestri più eterodossi dell’avanguardia, ha studiato pianoforte con un insegnante che aveva precedentemente studiato con Rachmaninoff. Non è una sorpresa dal momento che la musica per pianoforte del 19 ° secolo è una chiara influenza in tutto Constance and the Waiting di Troot. Ma la sorpresa arriva quando indica due tra i più importanti chitarristi come le sue epifanie musicali: penso che sia più interessante il fatto che a un certo punto il mio modo di suonare abbia cominciato ad essere influenzato maggiormente dai chitarristi. Sono andato al college nel 1981. In quell’anno uscirono due album, uno era Discipline dei King Crimson e l’altro era Speechless di Fred Frith, uno dei primi album solisti di Frith. Entrambi gli album mi hanno influenzato come musicista.

Constance and the Waiting è un risultato con molti livelli di complessità, che potrebbe difficilmente essere portato come esempio dello stato attuale dell’improvvisazione, vista la preponderanza della scrittura. Eppure, l’improvvisazione è stata una specie di fantasma nella stanza durante le sessioni. Alla domanda su dove questo disco si situerebbe in una linea ideale dove ad una estremità c’è la scrittura completa e l’altra la libera improvvisazione, Tim Root spiega più perché è stato così influenzato da Fripp e Frith: Speechless [di Fred Frith] è molto più improvvisativo, molto più aperto, molto più free jazz. E poi è arrivata la disciplina di Discipline [con Robert Fripp]. Entrambe le cose mi hanno davvero colpito esattamente al momento giusto. Volevo mettere un gruppo di musicisti in grado di suonare entrambi. Per suonare tutta questa musica improvvisata, free a la Fred Frith e suonare tutta la musica disciplinata che Fripp stava facendo. C’erano due diverse scuole di improvvisazione per questi musicisti [i musicisti di Troot], e il gruppo è davvero diviso a metà. Improvvisatori free come me, Beth Flenoor, Amy Denio, che siedono e suonano – e anche Bill Horist. Ci sedevamo e suonavamo completamente free. Penso agli altri improvvisatori, Julie Slick, Steve Ball, Marco Machera e Alex Anthony Faide. Il loro tipo di improvvisazione segue un approccio diverso. Steve parla molto di improvvisazione che sembra musica scritta e musica scritta che suona come improvvisazioni. Mi sono avvicinato a quell’idea. Alla fin dei conti l’improvvisazione derivava più dal sapere che avevo musicisti che sapevano ascoltare attentamente e determinare la parte giusta, perché gli arrangiamenti venivano decisi organicamente come un entità di gruppo.

steve_proj_3_044

Un altro anticonformista, questa volta la leggenda del rock progressivo Keith Emerson, ha avuto un’enorme influenza nella vita di Tim Root: ho sentito Emerson, il triplo album live di Lake and Palmer, Welcome Back my Friends, quando ero in terza media, esattamente nel momento giusto. Avevo 14 anni. Lui [Emerson] suona per 3 ore e fa due errori! Come si fa a farlo? Ci sono due sbavature lì da qualche parte. Keith proveniva da un altro pianeta. Era di un altro livello da “Mio Dio come lo fai?”. Le feroci e esplosive scale su e giù all’inizio di Dance Elena sono il tributo perfetto per Emerson, Lake e Palmer. Root sfrutta un groove così stringente su ciascun tasto del pianoforte che sembra citare da vicino il senso di urgenza ed anticipazione che Emerson imprimeva ad ogni nota che suonava. Due su e giù su un ottovolante nello stesso tema, la seconda volta la melodia trasposta di mezzo tono più in alto e poi modula, come analizza Tim Root. Il tema principale di questa traccia è stato scritto parecchio lontano nel passato, più precisamente 17 anni fa. Tutti i membri suonano probabilmente al loro massimo virtuosismo, mentre l’atmosfera si muove senza intoppi da accordi ritmici distortissimi con le chitarre a condurre a buffi botte e risposta dal sapore teatrale tra i musicisti, il tutto giocato ad una pazza velocità della luce.

Troot
Constance and the Waiting
1. Axe for the Frozen Sea Within
2. Dance Elena
3. Palasidai
4. Venice of the Sky
5. Hollow by Footsteps
6. Joey

Steve Ball – acoustic guitar
Amy Denio – saxophone and accordion
Alex Anthony Faide – guitar
Beth Fleenor – clarinets and voice
Nora Germain – violin
Bill Horist – guitar and prepared guitar
Alessandro Inolti – drums
Marco Machera – bass
Tim Root – piano and keyboards
Julie Slick – bass

www.facebook.com/trootmusic/
http://trootmusic.com

Annunci

Autore: Marcello Nardi

markellosnardoi ET yahoo DOT it

One thought on “Troot – Constance and the Waiting [2018] pt.1”

Rispondi

Inserisci i tuoi dati qui sotto o clicca su un'icona per effettuare l'accesso:

Logo WordPress.com

Stai commentando usando il tuo account WordPress.com. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Google+ photo

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Google+. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Foto Twitter

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Twitter. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Foto di Facebook

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Facebook. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Connessione a %s...