Troot – Constance and the Waiting [2018] pt.2

Interviews with Troot members from April to August 2018

First part
Italian version below

Like every note could bring a secret mark of how it was played, the story behind Troot‘s Constance and the Waiting is first and foremost the story of the players who made it happen. Through the shortest time this team of ten musicians, each with such a different background from each other, managed to arrange and play a complex piece of music that sits in an area between progressive, chamber and avant-garde. And the sense of fulfillment for making it happen subtly springs as the listener plays it.

Pressure and urgency were key elements in the band set-up, but apparently also the secret for the success of the project. With a certain dose of humour Alex Anthony Faide indicates the key element was being short-noticed last minute. It was my case: I knew of the project would have begun three days before that I was ultimately be there. That left really few time for preparation. It added extra tabasco!… and he’s immediately replied by Bill Horist: that’s a great example of Alex and I we have a different style, because I had to prepare a lot! Choosing first the members to fit the right approach instead of focusing on those instruments to include in the album is reiterated like a karma by the producers. Tim Root again: We really wanted Steve to be able to focus on producing, facilitating and doing working his magic. So it was his idea to bring in Alex. When I originally listed  the players for this album I wanted Steve and Bill, because I thought their pairing would have been really interesting and fruitful. Steve brought in Alex to sort of take on that role, because Alex focuses strictly on the music letting up Steve to focus on other stuff. Now we got these two guitars, the main guitars on the album: Bill bringing the free improvisation ‘Fred Frith’ prepared guitar crazy type and Alex bringing the immaculate perfect playing disciplined side of life, the ‘Robert Fripp’ side of life. I wanted that tension between those two players. My job then became -and this is really my job on the whole album- making it possible for their unique magic to bubble up. What’s not making Bill do things Bill that can do, not making Alex do things Alex can do, but letting up them be themselves and those two guitars colliding in really interesting ways. And again about choosing the balance between acoustic and electric instruments: adding that organic/moving-the-air in an acoustic way, having acoustic instruments was incredibly important, it’s not I said I really wanted clarinet or I really wanted sax or I really wanted violin, I wanted the right people. I wanted great musicians with great ears who are open for this kind of difficult projects, to show up and do their things. Amy is another great example too: she can play all the stuff, clarinet -although she does not play clarinet on the album- and alto sax. After a day of rehearsal she said ‘I’m gonna get my accordion’. She actually came back with two, we listened to them both and one was a better match for the album. She started playing accordion here and there. None would think of putting accordion on Axe from the Frozen Sea Within, but it’s there and it is perfect. That is because of the player, not for the instrument.

Putting musicians out of their comfort zone, but also allowing them to produce creatively in the arrangement phase. Tim RootThat was challenge of making the music in four days, sitting down as a group of ten people and figuring out ‘how do we take 40 minutes of piano music and turn it into 40 minutes of an ensemble’. By parsing up these parts, adding things, layering stuff. I didn’t send Nora a page of music and said ‘just play few bars’. I had Nora on the piano score, and said ‘please play what you think is appropriate to go with this’. That was the challenge, that’s where being great improvisers made this possible. Having these fantastic players, these fantastic ears. Approximately 70%/80% of the album was recorded during the days, with very few overdubs afterward. And improvisation was a key ingredient to allow players a deeper role in the arrangement phase, to let them decide where to put themselves in a sort of cooperative manner. Amy Denio says: We were given all a copy of the music that Tim was playing, so the music we would have worked with to look at if we wanted to read it. I tried to learn all the parts of all his 10 fingers and for me to decide which part I was actually able to play or somebody is coming with things I thought it would make counter rhythm or whatever polyrhythm. All of us we had the basic tools for our ears and these pieces of paper -many, many pieces of paper- we used our intuition toward our very best abilities trying to decide this mass of information and bring each of our individuals. As it began to take shape I think we all heard really how things were being arranged almost like none was hearing an arrangement.

steve_proj_3_006_med res

Steve Ball‘s previous experiences with ‘open ensembles’ like Tiny Orchestral Moments played a pivotal role. The album booklet features a list of practices that guided the sessions, explicitly mentioning they came from Steve’s ensemble. Starting from ‘Begin with Silence‘ and then ending with ‘Cleese Release‘ they can be confused with the term ‘rules’ from a how-to-apply-a-golden-rule mindset like mine. Instead they are not meant to set a direction, or even to prepare the musician for the rehearsal, but even more to focus on the event from an experiential afterward look. When I asked Steve Ball whether those were rules that set the path, sort of ground rules before the event, he took a long breath like he was summoning all the patience he never thought he could have and with a relentless spirit corrected me with this articulated and insightful answer: Most of those ideas are there for reflection after the fact. They aren’t necessarily useful as instructions or as some kind of recipe or formula. For me after years of playing in large ensembles where ego just destroys not only the process of what’s unfolding, but also the lives and the relationships of the people who were collaborating, I’ve developed over the years a set of principles and practices that, at the right moment, at the right observation, [can do] what might be necessary to change the energy from dispersed and crazy and provide funny stories to let’s hopefully these unison lines play together. To drop best of the energy that might in the room from the humour and the love and the fear that’s happening, but to turn it to transformative, into something that’s needed to focus and transform this energy into something that becomes part of what’s captured into music. Seeing all those 10 commitments, these words and theories outside of the actual experiences you share together can be very noisy and misleading and a waste of time. But, if you are at the end of the process or at the end of the day and you’re tired and you do not feel like like you can do anything else, you will remember that one of your favorite comedians [John Cleese] had a principle for how he applied work at the end of long day. He used to go an extra hour, even when he was done or everyone else left and he was dying. So as a group, if you are at the end of your rope, but you trust each other and you decide to let go of your exhaustion and let go what you want for yourself and put some extra effort, those can be moments that are unpredictable, unplannable and moments of incredible focus. You decide together to go beyond what you might normally do, if you are just in your automatic daily sleeping mode. That’s an example of a practice that sounds corny to say, but I call that ‘Cleese release’ and it is just a little reminder that when you are done and you are tired you don’t have to stop, you don’t have to give to your bodies impulse to just let it be good enough. Sometimes it can make the difference between album art that doesn’t have typos, which every album including this one has typos, than you think ‘Oh I am just I am done’ and you put a little of extra effort in. Something magical might emerge, because you re-apply your energy to go deeper or to go further than you might just have trusted your exhaustion. Self reflection and meditation let the musician enter a deeper state of self awareness, that reflects on team dynamics themselves. Beth Flenoor explains in practice it with the reverence and the importance of silence in this process of starting from silence and returning to silence. All of those frequency builds up and becomes more and more chaotic, it gets released and then you can take a breath and really listen to entirety of the environment and the people and the egos and the intentions and then start again. It didn’t just happen at the beginning or at the end of the day, but it was part of the practice to keep reminding ourselves to keep returning to that to build that energy bank to actually give birth to this thing.

Tim Root is deeply influenced by working as theatre music composer. His music has a sort of visual type. Before Constance and the Waiting being released, I asked Marco Machera his opinion about this work and he turned this answer to me: when we played it all together, it sounded like a whole opera. Theatre and narrative are recurrent red threads here. My work of the theatre is also a big part of this Tim Root says. I scored plays, I conducted, I worked in musical theatres. I know how to pick a picture, how to tell a story musically. I think as a composer, as an arranger, I know there’s a longer arch in theatre emotionally, that I think to go for the music, to let the piece evolve over periods of  this kind and take you somewhere. Palasidai is a great example of that. A delicate major arpeggiated chord sways between the tonic, the major seconds and third and back before gently leaning against to a diminished 7th chord in Palasidai‘s intro. When we move to the verse, violin, clarinet and sax lead a chromatic melody through the chords, until the cadence brings to the elegiac, pastoral main theme played by saxophone, while the full band supports it with an ecstatic wall of sound. Flashes are going in front of our eyes, we are uplifted, flying through as an archaic melody and so many celebrated themes come back into our memory. Pink Floyd‘s Us and them maybe? -hear how the last note ends on the diminished chord. Or maybe classical movies soundtrack? -Italian movie fans might resonate with Piero Piccioni‘s Samba Fortuna, the main theme from Il Professor Guido Tersilli‘s soundtrack. That’s what great melodies made by great composers do.

Palasidai‘s first part ends with a variation on the chromatic theme, a chromatic mediance that moves from a major chord to another hints Tim Root, which proves again the craftiness of work in the arrangement of counterpoint made by the band. Movement to the second part is almost subtle: like when audience is already clapping when ending a great pitch of tension during a show, like moving off a cliff. But still the band is playing. Now the tension grows back again in, everything is growing, everything is dramatically increasing like a wave of the ocean. Ladies and gentlemen, let Beth Flenoor in! An impressive mixture of growls, echoes, sounds, undetectable utterances, a sort of esperanto of expressions that mixes syllables from English, French and whatever might trigger an emotion. Tim Root acknowledges it as a moment of magic: what Beth has there by the way is her own language. She and I haven’t talked a lot because Beth is magic. I’ve learnt just to let Beth do what Beth does. She is magic. That’s it, just say ‘go, please do the thing you do best’ and she’s got that. But if I were to guess, I would say to what Beth has developed is a set of performance instructions that allows her to improvise a language. I think it is amazing. Beth Flenoor tells more about how all of this came to surface: I initially sat down to work on this music as a clarinetist. As Tim played it for us live at the piano from memory from the depths of his heart and we were in this room where we all gathered for this time, I immediately heard those other parts which part of my practice is to never ignore that when it calls you, you answer the phone and let it come through. That entire section was not a pre-meditated or scripted or thought-out, it was a complete emotional response and integration to what it felt to me and what the music was asking for. I have consciously for the last 11 yrs been working with music-based out of my own language, it has been happening my entire life, but I have been very conscious of it as a composer. Using this language that is based on syllables to go directly at the heart of an emotional response, that is not tied to any definition of words. Those words, in whatever language they are spoken, they are like microscopes that look at much deeper sentiment. This syllabic language is about bypassing all of those centers and going directly to an emotional response and whatever it calls for you as a listener. That’s the language that I write my own music in. It’s the language that I use when I am moving around the world and speaking with people or experiences even when nobody else in the room does not know about it means, but that’s how I interface with exystence at large. For me it was just getting permissioned to open the facet and let this thing come through of what I thought like I was hearing asking me for.

steve_proj_3_052_medres.jpeg

We think of Weather Report‘s Birdland as the fast and thin line of descending chords in Venice of the Sky‘s intro sweeps in. Alessandro Inolti alternates powerful hits to more frequent breaks, making easier to compare with a mixture of Carl Palmer‘s percussive approach with the witty savagery of Mike Portnoy. Moving through the destructured solos by Bill Horist, then by Amy Denio, the track brings whimsical moments and then more propelling parts until the ending pristine solo by Nora Germain on violin. Tim praises her contribution in this way: Nora was Steve’s suggestion. He brought her in for several reasons. She can play every note of the album, she is an immaculate musician. She can play everything she gets. She is a very quick learner. She was familiar with Steve’s way of working with groups, the Tiny Orchestral Moments approach. The role of the violin in terms of arrangement we just let that evolve. We let her ears determine the place for her to use her violin, to accentuate melodies, to accentuate rhythmic stuff, the stuff that she does.

Only apparently de-structured, Hollow by Footsteps is a delicate and romantic 21st century romanza. Violin and clarinet dialogue intensely with the piano, move from reflectiveness to agitation multiple times, giving evidence to Tim‘s piano sound and to intimate recording engineering thanks to Jonathan Plum. Aggressiveness comes back in a sudden manner in ending’s track, Joey. Moving quirky through a throbbing beat in 9, this is the earliest composition by Tim Root  -it was composed back in 1984. Again an highly crafted counterpoint, a progressive orientation and a wide use of chromaticisms refer to avant-garde classical until heavy metal. Through frequent start and stops, we land on a peak of aggressiveness when the main themes are back in and the finale is the full band at his highest.

Analyzing where all Constance and the Waiting‘s influences come from might turn out to be an exercise of redundant and annoying meticulousness. I would rather agree with Tim‘s example that clarifies the futile value of labeling music sometimes: a couple of days after we recorded our music I was at an EchoTest show in Seattle and I was talking to Julie outside after their set. Someone walked up and asked Julie ‘what kind of music do you guys play? how do you call that music?’. It’s the hardest question for a musician to answer and I think her answer was wonderful: ‘Beautiful!’. So what’s the unifying glue that keeps this record in, that makes us feeling we are part of an opera and builds that invisible thread line through the 40 minutes? Julie Slick indicates a direction: you can tell that all of this is coming from the same composer because there’s definitively vision there. Whether the secret ingredient of Constance and the Waiting was a clear vision during composing process or a state-of-the-art team working, these 10 musicians were able to enter ‘the Zone’, go for the extra-hour and create an unpredictable and unprecedented effort. 

Troot
Constance and the Waiting
1. Axe for the Frozen Sea Within
2. Dance Elena
3. Palasidai
4. Venice of the Sky
5. Hollow by Footsteps
6. Joey

Steve Ball – acoustic guitar
Amy Denio – saxophone and accordion
Alex Anthony Faide – guitar
Beth Fleenor – clarinets and voice
Nora Germain – violin
Bill Horist – guitar and prepared guitar
Alessandro Inolti – drums
Marco Machera – bass
Tim Root – piano and keyboards
Julie Slick – bass

www.facebook.com/trootmusic/
http://trootmusic.com

First part
Italian version

Così come ogni nota porta un segno segreto di come è stata suonata, la trama di  Constance and the Waiting dei Troot è prima di tutto la storia dei musicisti che l’hanno suonato. Per un periodo di tempo limitato, questo gruppo di dieci musicisti, ognuno con uno background così diverso l’uno dall’altro, è riuscito ad arrangiare e suonare un lavoro complesso che si trova in un’area a cavallo tra progressive, musica da camera e avant-garde. E il senso di appagamento nell’esserci riusciti si sente in maniera sottile quando lo si ascolta.

La pressione e l’urgenza sono stati elementi chiave nell’organizzazione del gruppo, ma apparentemente anche il segreto stesso del successo del progetto. Con una certa dose di umorismo, Alex Anthony Faide indica che l’elemento chiave è stato essere avvertito veramente all’ultimo minuto. Così è successo a me: ho saputo che il progetto sarebbe iniziato tre giorni prima di quando poi mi sono trovato lì. C’é stato davvero poco tempo per la preparazione. E questo ha aggiunto ulteriore tabasco! … e a lui risponde immediatamente Bill Horist: questo è un ottimo esempio di come Alex e io abbiamo uno stile diverso, perché io, invece, mi sono dovuto preparare molto! Concentrarsi prima sui musicisti invece che su quali strumenti da includere e poi trovare i musicisti, questa è stata la direzione seguita come il karma dai produttori. Tim Root ancora: volevamo che Steve fosse in grado di concentrarsi sulla produzione, sulla facilitazione e su come creare la magia del gruppo. È stata una sua idea portare Alex. Quando all’inizio ho elencato i musicisti per questo album, volevo Steve e Bill, perché pensavo che il loro abbinamento sarebbe stato molto interessante e fruttuoso. Steve ha proposto ad Alex di assumere quel ruolo, perché Alex si concentrasse esclusivamente sulla musica, lasciando che Steve si concentrasse, invece, su altre cose. Ora abbiamo queste due chitarre, le chitarre principali dell’album: Bill che porta l’improvvisazione libera a la ‘Fred Frith, con la sua pazzia chitarristica, e Alex che porta il perfetto lato disciplinato della vita, il lato della vita a la ‘Robert Fripp’. Volevo quella tensione tra questi due musicisti. Il mio lavoro è poi diventato – e questo è davvero il mio lavoro nell’intero album – fare in modo che la loro magia unica potesse esplodere. Fare in modo che Bill non facesse le cose che abitualmente Bill può fare, fare in modo che Alex non facesse le cose che abitualmente Alex può fare, ma lasciare che siano loro due e le loro due chitarre a scontrarsi in modo davvero interessante. E ancora sull’equilibrio tra strumenti acustici ed elettrici: aggiungere quella specie di carattere  organico, quella cifra di strumenti che muovono l’aria, ovvero avere strumenti acustici era incredibilmente importante. Non é stato che volevo esattamente il clarinetto o che volevo esattamente il sax o che volevo esattamente violino, ma volevo le persone giuste. Volevo grandi musicisti con l’orecchio giusto, che fossero aperti a questo tipo di progetti difficili, che si presentassero e facessero le loro cose. Amy è un altro esempio perfetto: può suonare tutto, il clarinetto, anche se non suona il clarinetto nell’album, e il sax alto. Dopo un giorno di prove, ha detto “Prenderò la mia fisarmonica”. In realtà è tornata con due, le abbiamo ascoltate entrambe e una era un più adatta per l’album. Ha iniziato a suonare la fisarmonica qua e là. Nessuno penserebbe di mettere la fisarmonica su Axe from the Frozen Sea Within, ma c’é e ci sta perfettamente. Questo è dovuto al musicista, non allo strumento.

Mettere i musicisti fuori dalla loro comfort zone, ma anche permettere loro di aggiungere il loro apporto creativo nella fase di arrangiamento. Tim Root: Questa è stata la sfida nel creare la musica in quattro giorni, sedersi come un gruppo di dieci persone e capire “come facciamo con 40 minuti di musica per pianoforte a trasformarla in 40 minuti di un ensemble”. Analizzando queste parti, aggiungendo, stratificando. Non é che ho inviato a Nora una pagina di musica e ho detto “Suona solo poche battute”. Avevo la partitura per pianoforte e ho detto a Nora “per favore suona quello che pensi sia appropriato per questo”. Questa è stata la sfida, avere grandi improvvisatori ha reso possibile tutto ciò. Avere questi fantastici musicisti, con l’orecchio giusto. Circa il 70% / 80% dell’album è stato registrato durante le giornate, con pochissime sovraincisioni fatte in seguito. E l’improvvisazione é stata un ingrediente chiave per consentire ai musicisti un ruolo più profondo nella fase di arrangiamento, per consentire loro di decidere dove situarsi in maniera quasi autogestita. Amy Denio dice: Ci è stata data una copia della musica che Tim avrebbe suonato, quindi la musica con cui avremmo lavorato avremmo potuto eseguirla allo spartito. Ho cercato di imparare tutte le parti di tutte e dieci le sue dita per decidere quale parte ero in grado di suonare o decidere come situarmi rispetto a qualcuno che avrebbe fatto contro ritmo o qualunque poliritmia. Tutti noi avevamo gli strumenti di base per le nostre orecchie e questi pezzi di carta – molti, molti pezzi di carta – li abbiamo usati attraverso la nostra intuizione, nelle nostre migliori capacità cercando di discernere in questa massa di informazioni e portare ognuno delle nostre individualità. Quando ha cominciato a prendere forma, penso che tutti abbiamo sentito davvero come stava nascendo l’organizzazione del pezzo, quasi come se nessuno stesse ascoltando un accordo.

steve_proj_3_006_med res

Le precedenti esperienze di Steve Ball con “ensemble aperti” come i Tiny Orchestral Moments hanno avuto un ruolo fondamentale. Il booklet dell’album presenta un elenco di pratiche che hanno guidato le sessioni, indicando esplicitamente che provenivano dall’ensemble di Steve. Partendo da “Inizia con il silenzio” e poi finendo con “La distensione di Cleese”, questi possono essere confusi con il termine di “regole” da una mentalità che cerco di applicare una regola ad ogni meccanismo della vita come la mia. Invece, non hanno lo scopo di stabilire una direzione, o addirittura di preparare il musicista alle prove, ma ancor più di concentrarsi sull’evento a posteriori, da una prospettiva successiva ed esperienziale. Quando ho chiesto a Steve Ball se quelle erano regole che stabilivano il percorso, una sorta di regole di base fissate prima delle prove, ha fatto un lungo respiro, come se stesse facendo incetta di tutta la pazienza che avrebbe mai potuto avere, e con uno spirito calmo e inflessibile mi ha corretto con questo risposta articolata e rivelatrice: la maggior parte di quelle idee sono lì per riflettere a posteriori dopo che qualcosa é avvenuta. Non sono necessariamente utili come istruzioni o come qualche tipo di ricetta o formula. Per me, dopo anni a suonare in grandi ensemble in cui l’ego distrugge non solo il processo di ciò che si sta svolgendo, ma anche le vite e le relazioni delle persone che stavano collaborando insieme, ho sviluppato nel corso degli anni una serie di principi e pratiche che al momento giusto, attraverso l’osservazione giusta, [possono fare] ciò che potrebbe essere necessario per cambiare l’energia da uno stato di dispersione e di inquietudine e fornire storie divertenti per far in modo che le persone come note all’unisono ritornino a suonare insieme. Lasciare che la parte migliore dell’energia porti nella stanza la parte migliore dell’umorismo, dell’amore e della paura, trasformarla in qualcosa di trasformativo, in qualcosa che è necessario per mettere a fuoco ciò che conta. Trasformare questa energia in qualcosa che diventa parte della musica. Vedere tutti questi 10 musicisti impegnati in un progetto comune, queste parole e teorie al di fuori delle esperienze reali che condividi insieme può confondere, essere fuorviante, una perdita di tempo. Ma se sei alla fine del processo o alla fine della giornata e sei stanco e non ti senti come se tu potessi fare qualsiasi altra cosa, ti ricorderai che uno dei tuoi comici preferiti [John Cleese] aveva un principio per come sopravvivere al lavoro alla fine di una lunga giornata. Lui era solito andare avanti per un’ora in più, anche quando aveva finito o tutti gli altri se ne andavano e lui stava morendo. Quindi, come gruppo, se sei alla fine della tua benzina, ma ti fidi l’uno dell’altro e decidi di lasciar andare la tua stanchezza e lasciare andare quello che vuoi per te stesso e fare qualche sforzo in più, quelli possono essere momenti imprevedibili , senza prezzo, e momenti di concentrazione incredibile. Decidi di andare insieme al di là di ciò che potresti fare normalmente se sei solo in una modalità di riposo. Questo è un esempio di una pratica che sembra banale da dire, ma io la chiamo “distensione di Cleese” ed è solo un piccolo promemoria di come, quando hai finito e sei stanco, non devi fermarti, non devi dare al tuo corpo l’impulso di lasciare tutto. A volte può fare la differenza tra i momenti di album che non hanno errori, che ogni album incluso questo ha, rispetto a quando pensi “Oh, ce l’ho fatta” e hai messo un po’ di sforzo in più. Qualcosa di magico potrebbe emergere, perché riapplichi la tua energia per andare più in profondità o per andare più lontano di quanto tu non abbia potuto facendo se ti fidavi della tua stanchezza. La riflessione e la meditazione sulla performance fanno entrare il musicista in uno spazio più ampio di consapevolezza che si trasmette all’intero gruppo. Beth Flenoor spiega in pratica che ruolo abbiano il rispetto e l’importanza del silenzio in questo processo del partire dal silenzio e tornare al silenzio. Tutte queste frequenze si accumulano e diventano sempre più caotiche, si distendono e quindi si può respirare e ascoltare davvero l’interezza dell’ambiente e delle persone, degli io e delle intenzioni di tutti e poi ricominciare. Non è successo solo all’inizio o alla fine della giornata, ma era parte della routine continuare a ricordare a noi stessi di continuare a tornare su quel punto per costruire quella riserva di energia, per dare alla luce questo disco.

Tim Root è profondamente influenzato dalle sue esperienze come compositore di musica teatrale. La sua musica ha una sorta di cifra visiva. Prima della pubblicazione di Constance and the Waiting, ho chiesto a Marco Machera la sua opinione su questo lavoro e mi ha rivolto questa interessante risposta: quando abbiamo suonato tutto insieme, sembrava essere come un’opera unica. Il teatro e la narrativa sono fili rossi ricorrenti. La mia esperienza nell’opera teatrale ha una ruolo importante – dice Tim Root. Ho realizzato spettacoli teatrali, ho diretto concerti, ho lavorato nella musica per teatro. So come scegliere un’immagine, come raccontare una storia dal punto di vista musicale. Penso che come compositore, come arrangiatore, so che c’è un arco emotivo più lungo nel teatro, che penso ad inserire nel pezzo, per lasciare che si evolva per periodi di tipo teatrale e ti porti da qualche parte. Palasidai è un grande esempio di ciò. Un delicato accordo maggiore arpeggiato ondeggia tra la tonica, la seconda maggiore, la terza e torna indietro prima di appoggiarsi delicatamente a un accordo di 7a diminuito nell’intro di Palasidai. Quando ci spostiamo alla strofa, il violino, il clarinetto e il sax conducono una melodia cromatica che attraversa gli accordi, fino a quando la cadenza non porta al tema principale dal sapere elegiaco e pastorale suonato dal sassofono, mentre la band a completare lo supporta con un muro estatico di suoni. Ci sono lampi di fonte ai nostri occhi, siamo sollevati, voliamo come su una melodia arcaica e tanti temi celebri tornano nella nostra mente. Us and them dei Pink Floyd forse? – da ascoltare come l’ultima nota termina sull’accordo diminuito. O forse la colonna sonora di alcuni film classici? -I fan del cinema italiano potrebbero pensare a Samba Fortuna di Piero Piccioni, il tema principale della colonna sonora de Il Professor Guido Tersilli. Questa é la maniera in cui suonano le grandi melodie composte dai grandi compositori.

La prima parte di Palasidai termina con una variazione sul tema cromatico, una medianità cromatica che si sposta da un accordo maggiore a un altro accenna Tim Root, che dimostra ancora una volta la sapienza del lavoro della band nella disposizione del contrappunto. Il movimento verso la seconda parte è quasi impercettibile: come quando il pubblico sta già battendo le mani quando termina un grande momento di tensione durante lo spettacolo, o come muoversi sulla cima di una montagna. Ma la band continua a suonare. Ora la tensione ricresce, tutto sta crescendo, tutto sta drammaticamente aumentando come un’onda oceanica. Signore e signori, ecco a voi Beth Flenoor! Una miscela impressionante di ringhi, echi, suoni, enigmi irrisolvibili, una sorta di esperanto di espressioni che mescola sillabe dall’inglese, dal francese e da qualunque cosa possa scatenare un’emozione. Tim Root lo racconta come un momento di magia: quello che Beth fa vedere lì è il suo linguaggio. Lei e io non abbiamo parlato molto, perché Beth è magica. Ho imparato a lasciare che Beth faccia ciò che Beth fa. Lei è magica. È tutto, basta dire ‘vai, per favore fai quello che sai fare meglio’ e lei lo fa. Ma se dovessi indovinare, direi che ciò che Beth ha sviluppato è un insieme di istruzioni performative che le permettono di improvvisare una lingua. Penso che sia fantastico. Beth Flenoor a sua volta racconta di come tutto questo è venuto alla luce: inizialmente mi sono seduta per lavorare su questa musica come clarinettista. Appena Tim ce l’ha suonata dal vivo al pianoforte, eseguendola a memoria, dal profondo del suo cuore, ed eravamo in questa stanza dove tutti ci eravamo riuniti per questa volta, ho immediatamente sentito ciò che potevo suonarci. Parte della mia pratica è quella di non ignorarlo mai quando ti chiama, rispondi al telefono e fallo uscire. Quell’intera sezione non era pre-meditata o preparata o pensata, era una risposta emotiva piena e un’integrazione a ciò che sentivo e a ciò che la musica stava chiedendo. Negli ultimi 11 anni ho consciamente lavorato con musica basata sulla mia lingua: è successo per tutta la mia vita, ne sono stata molto consapevole come compositore, usando questo linguaggio basato sulle sillabe per andare direttamente al centro di una risposta emotiva, non legata a nessuna definizione di parole. Quelle parole, in qualunque lingua siano proferite, sono come microscopi che guardano a sentimenti molto più profondi. Questo linguaggio sillabico consiste nel bypassare tutti questi centri di senso ed andare direttamente a una risposta emotiva e qualunque cosa ti richieda come ascoltatore. Questa è la lingua in cui scrivo la mia musica. È la lingua che uso quando mi muovo in tutto il mondo e parlo con persone o esperienze anche quando nessun altro nella stanza non lo sa, ma è così che mi interfaccio con l’esistenza in generale. Per me è stato solo il permesso di aprire la porta e lasciare che questa cosa venisse fuori dalla richiesta che mi era stata fatta.

steve_proj_3_052_medres.jpeg

Pensiamo a Birdland dei Weather Report appena suona la sottile e veloce linea di accordi discendenti nell’introduzione di Venice of the Sky. Alessandro Inolti alterna colpi potenti a pause più frequenti, rendendo più facile il confronto tra l’approccio percussivo di Carl Palmer e l’aggressività ironica di Mike Portnoy. Passando attraverso gli assoli destrutturati di Bill Horist, e poi di Amy Denio, la traccia porta l’ascoltatore attraverso momenti stravaganti e parti più propulsive fino all’assolo finale di Nora Germain al violino. Tim riconosce il suo contributo in questo modo: Nora é stata un suggerimento di Steve. L’ha portata dentro per diversi motivi. Sa suonare ogni nota dell’album, è una musicista immacolata. Lei può suonare tutto ciò che vuole. È una persona molto veloce ad apprendere. Aveva familiarità con il modo in cui Steve lavorava con i gruppi, l’approccio dei Tiny Orchestral Moments. Il ruolo del violino in termini di arrangiamento lo abbiamo lasciato semplicemente evolvere. Abbiamo lasciato che il suo orecchio decidesse dove usare il violino, per accentuare le melodie, per accentuare le parti ritmiche, ciò che fa.

Solo apparentemente destrutturata, Hollow by Footsteps è una romanza delicata e romantica da 21esimo secolo. Il violino e il clarinetto dialogano intensamente con il pianoforte, passando da uno stato riflessivo ad uno di agitazione più volte, dando evidenza al suono di pianoforte di Tim e del lavoro di Jonathan Plum come ingegnere del suono. L’aggressività ritorna in modo improvviso nella traccia del finale, Joey. Si muove in modo eccentrico attraverso un palpitante battito in 9. Joey è la prima composizione di Tim Root in termini di tempo – è stata composta nel 1984. Anche in questo caso un contrappunto molto elaborato, un orientamento progressive ed un vasto uso dei cromatismi fanno riferimento alla classica, all’avanguardia fino all’heavy metal. Attraverso frequenti avvii e arresti, arriviamo a un picco di aggressività quando i temi principali ritornano e il finale è con la band tutta insieme al suo massimo.

Analizzare da dove provengono tutte le influenze di Constance and the Waiting potrebbe rivelarsi un esercizio di meticolosità fine a se stessa e fastidiosa. Piuttosto, sono d’accordo con l’esempio di Tim su come approcciare qualsiasi tentativo di etichettarla: un paio di giorni dopo aver registrato la nostra musica ero ad uno show degli EchoTest a Seattle e stavo parlando con Julie fuori dal locale dopo il loro set. Un tizio si é avvicinato e ha chiesto a Julie ‘che tipo di musica suoni? come si chiama questa musica?’. È la domanda più difficile per un musicista a cui rispondere e penso che la sua risposta sia stata meravigliosa: “Suono musica bellissima!”. Quindi qual’è la colla che mantiene questo disco, che ci fa sentire parte di un’opera e costruisce quella linea invisibile attraverso i suoi 40 minuti? Julie Slick indica una direzione: puoi dire che tutto questo proviene dallo stesso compositore perché c’è una visione chiara sotto. Se l’ingrediente segreto di Constance and the Waiting sia stato una visione chiara durante il processo di composizione o creare un team di lavoro perfettamente oliato, difficile stabilirlo. Questi 10 musicisti, però, sono stati in grado di entrare nella “Zona” di ispirazione, andare avanti per un’ora supplementare e creare un risultato originale e senza precedenti.

Troot
Constance and the Waiting
1. Axe for the Frozen Sea Within
2. Dance Elena
3. Palasidai
4. Venice of the Sky
5. Hollow by Footsteps
6. Joey

Steve Ball – acoustic guitar
Amy Denio – saxophone and accordion
Alex Anthony Faide – guitar
Beth Fleenor – clarinets and voice
Nora Germain – violin
Bill Horist – guitar and prepared guitar
Alessandro Inolti – drums
Marco Machera – bass
Tim Root – piano and keyboards
Julie Slick – bass

www.facebook.com/trootmusic/
http://trootmusic.com

Annunci

Autore: Marcello Nardi

markellosnardoi ET yahoo DOT it

One thought on “Troot – Constance and the Waiting [2018] pt.2”

Rispondi

Inserisci i tuoi dati qui sotto o clicca su un'icona per effettuare l'accesso:

Logo WordPress.com

Stai commentando usando il tuo account WordPress.com. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Google+ photo

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Google+. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Foto Twitter

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Twitter. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Foto di Facebook

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Facebook. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Connessione a %s...