Antonio Sanchez – Lines in the Sand [CamJazz 2018]

We are moving to http://www.musicforwatermelons.com/2018/antonio-sanchez-lines-in-the-sand-camjazz-2018/

When in 2005 Pat Metheny Group released The Way Up, a monumental almost 70-minutes suite made of 4 tracks crossing so many genres that would be hardly filed only in the jazz label, it became an instant success and a recording appearing in most of the best-of-the-year lists. Summoning one of the best creative and pushing forward moments of the long-living band, it resulted a redefining footstep of how an unexpected epic narrative could be developed by a jazz artist. Looking back at the past, I personally felt like a bridge was made between my jazz and progressive rock listenings: lately I realized this held a clue of how differently this sense of narrativity is embraced by artists belonging to an area and to another. What would have seemed a dismaying mountain to climb for any jazz artist -not to mention the implict risk of jeopardizing any improvisation attitude when navigating such complexes arrays of ostinatos and counterpoints- was instead not frightening for drummer Antonio Sanchez. The fellow member of Pat Metheny Group revived that narrativity and that same momentous articulated style of composition with his Migration band, now hailing another overcomplex recording of extended duration, entitled Lines in the Sand. Yet, what is more striking about this recording, putting a mark of difference between what came before, is the need to tell a contemporary story. The story is happening now, the story is in front of our eyes every day in the news. It’s the story of the immigrants facing desperation on the southern border of US. Antonio Sanchez goes back to that same narrativity as in The Way Up to tell this story.

Annunci

SKE – 1001 Autunni [Fading 2018]

Interview in Sep2018 + review

Italian version below

When Soft Machine unambiguously claimed there was ‘a music for the body and a music for the mind’ and they steered with no regret to the second, this resulted in being one of clearest statement a rock progressive musician could do. Ever since every progger knew which side to favor. This exploitation of the musical mind against the body shaking of the commercial music made the fortune of prog and it played a role in its decay. Even today, being linked to prog, or even being linked with the most orthodox and audacious wing of rock in opposition, sounds like a declaration of membership to the intellectualism opposed to the pulsating body of radio music. Juxtapositions are a key to reinforce a cultural identity, but also produce defectors who like to step over the trenches. Paolo SKE Botta liked to fraternize, as an artist, with the enemy: in his first solo work, released in 2011 as 1000 Autunni and now reprinted, he didn’t settle for making music just for the mind, but he chose to add a sense of bodily trembling to his music. Ears will pay attention to the layered and rhythmically complex melodies and the carefully crafted arrangements bringing the influence of late ’70s rock in opposition and chamber music, but also the influence of Canterbury alumni, through Gentle Giant and Italian iconic proggers Banco del Mutuo Soccorso, up to the most recent outputs of Scandinavian progressive. In short, ears will be intrigued by this magmatic maelstrom, which brings the strong and precise imprint of a work of the mind. Yet something is missing: under the blanket of the mind-produced layers, the ear digs like in a fog and finds a subtly emotional mood, which lures a sense of instinctual attention to the body.

I would like to give equal weight to the cerebral effect of writing and to the instinctive act of listening, says Paolo SKE Botta. In the last ten years he built himself a career in progressive avant-garde with a distinctive sound playing on both the body and the mind side. SKE – this moniker is now indistinguishable from his first name – is equipped with a fierce strictly ’70s made synth array, helping him to put an innovative way between vintage and avant-garde. He is linked with the avant-garde music scene of italian prog, and with the AltrOck records run by Marcello Marinone: he played live with the Picchio dal Pozzo, one of the most unjustly unrecognized bands in the Italian prog scene, on their comeback in the 2000s and recorded 2010’s A_Live with them. He joined fellows Homunculus Res, Greeks Ciccada and French Camembert. But he linked his name above all at two bands, Not a Good Sign and Yugen. A founding member of the first, they put themselves in an area in between contemporary progressive song format and experimentation, playing what sounds expected and mixing it with mischievous elements of unexpected, rhythmic virtuosity, minimalist slips of meter, polymetric layers. They published their third and most complex work in 2018, titled Icebound.

Yugen, on the other hand, is one of the most extreme bands in contemporary music, and not just linked with prog area. An hyperchamber ensemble made of both acoustic and electric instruments, created by guitarist Francesco Zago and producer Marcello Marinone as an extended and variable ensemble, Yugen mixes the extremism of classical avant-garde -count Conlon Nancarrow as one of the references here- with coldly ferocious aggressive lines of the ‘avant progressive. Experimentation through the whole composing process combined with a virtuosity while playing the most intricate scores, this ensemble rarely plays live setting due to the disproportionate size of the ensemble. One performance is worth mentioning, the one at the Rock in Opposition festival of 2011, documented in Romantic Warriors II: A Progressive Music Saga About Rock in Opposition. It is an important testament being included in this pivotal documentary about the history of rock in opposition.

I would like to give equal weight to the cerebral effect of writing and to the instinctive act of listening

Reprinted today with an additional number in the title –1001 instead of 1000– and a live performance from 2013 on a second disc, it went immediately out of print at the time of release in 2011 and is a cult record among the listeners of avant prog. The story behind 1000 Autunni is strongly linked to the collaboration with Yugen. SKE borrowed multiple musicians from the ensemble for his debut output: Francesco Zago on guitar and Valerio Cipollone on clarinets, Mattia Signò on drums, Maurizio Fasoli on piano, Elia Mariani on violin, Giuseppe Olivini on percussions. In addition musicians already linked with AltrOck label as Pierre Wawrzyniak on bass and Pierre Toussaint on trombone, both in Camembert, Nikolas Nikolopoulos from Ciccada on flute, and Markus Stauss on sax, Enrica Di Bastiano all’arpa and voices by Roberta Pagani and Valerio Reina. At that time, with exception of few projects, the core of my musical collaborations was with Yugen musicians. This is plain when looking at how arrangements were made and who the musicians were. Multiple musicians came from Yugen. If sometimes I decided that I needed somebody specific, I usually tried to value the people I knew I could work well with. SKE tells he crafted 1000 Autunni in the 2009-2010 timeframe, in the same period he was joining Yugen‘s milestone Iridule: it took me a year to write it [1000 Autunni]. I wrote and arranged it fully between April 2009 and April 2010 and then recorded it since April to December 2010. The two are linked by a red thread: Iridule is my favorite record by Yugen, we are talking about a record I feel very bonded with. But from the writing point of view Iridule and 1000 Autunni are extremely different. They start from different conceptions. Iridule is a dismemberment album, an album that decomposes. Instead 1000 Autunni is an album that recomposes, from my point of view. It’s not Iridule being academic, but I applied a filter of emotion that I care a lot in 1000 Autunni.

SKE paints a picture according to these rules, drawing lines that start from the structure and reach instinct. Fraguglie is the piece that highlights best this mechanism. Hammond opens it erupting a waterfall of arpeggios answered by powerful distorted power chords by the electric guitar, which stands uncertain whether to underline the beat or break it. Drums try desperately to find a beat to which to cling. In the momentary breaks in between this rainfall it’s guitar, this time in clean mode, to dialogue with the flute, between various slips of minimalist accents, until the rhythm seems to sit almost stable and allow the mellotron entering, whose large plans create a sense of lingering dissolution. A lyrical break interrupts this mechanical hell after a minute and half, leaving the stage for the melancholic clarinet and the modular sound of the Binson. But it is only a momentary break: aggression still rises and amid a rain of fragments, between melodies divided into complex counterpoints, references to classic prog surface to the top, such as a sudden Hugh Banton-like organ climbing. In the ending section synths come back to dialogue with clarinet and sax in a growing tension moment, before disappearing for keyboards to play a puzzling ending. The listener bounces between taking care to address the structure of the track and being dragged back to an inner world by a powerful force. A complex organic, with keyboards, vibrafones and winds interacting in intricate and geometrical lines, that creates a parallel with the virtuoso excesses and layered scores by Gentle Giant and many contemporary avant-prog acts. But it also points at experiments outside the prog domain, like those by the Norwegian ensemble Jaga Jazzist. SKE about the opening track: the feeling of traffic that you can perceive at the beginning of Fraguglie is the result of a stratification process, in the sense of reconstruction of various materials, so as to be able to preserve the specific characteristics of the elements without losing the whole identity. The listener should be able to follow the voices of the various instruments as they were playing in my head. These make independent paths that are not interfering with general design that is evident when listening to it at surface level.

Drummers often ask me ‘why don’t you play an accent on the beat every now and then?’. Ok, I’m working on it!

I often find myself discussing with drummers about the unused possibilities of the drums to be able to proceed on different paths within multiple parts, which something that I really like. It reminds me minimalism, but I like to apply it to the drums. Polymeteric structures are directly linked with this approach and are visible in most of the rhythmic sections of the instruments. By removing the drums or allowing it to enter in an unusual manner, metrical counterpoints are becoming more relevant in comparison to harmonic and melodic counterpoints. […] Drummers often hate me and they ask me ‘why don’t you play an accent on the beat every now and then?’. But I’m working on my attitude to put the beats together with accent! The live performance of Fraguglie in the second disc, performed at the AltrOck festival two years after the release of the album in 2013 with a smaller band than the one in the debut, allows the drummer breathing a little bit. The intro has a more relaxed groove, played slightly back to the beat, and creates space for a long improvisation section in which hammond, guitar and clarinets dialogue over a fast 70s jazz-rock tempo. The piece is divided in halves, this time with a second part that remains even more suspended, interrupted almost suddenly by the return of the more complex and written structure and intricate polyrhythms at the end of the piece. These tricks are one of the distinctive features by SKE at the score table: the interest in polyrhythms is translated into overlays of instruments that follow continuous and shifting rhythmic pulses, while accents are placed each at different points of the bar. It is possible to listen to it at various stages in Fraguglie, but SKE makes an extensive usage also in his band Not a Good Sign – take the chorus in Wait for me from their second album as example. Interestingly, the dramatic effect in his solo album and in Not a Good Sign is very similar, triggering a sense of suspension and of shift of listening attention – somewhat close to certain compositions by Steve Reich. Another quote by SKE indicates this direction, hinting at how this writing mechanism is linked with kind of an emotional effect: I am a fan of minimalistic moods, and of dreamy, soft atmospheres. I’m a super melancholy guy!

Denti moves from a broody soundscape reminiscent of latest decades Scandinavian progressive acts and can be easily associated with an Änglagård influence. A brief and barely melancholic four-notes melody dangles in the middle and changes its rhythmic configuration while rebounding from Stauss‘s saxophone to Toussaint‘s vibraphone. At same time the Hammond changes different rhythmic pathways in the background. Still Mellotron is the star of the key moments of the track: playing a flutes carpet in the intro and then – as indicated in the super detailed booklet – switching to a Russian choir during the second theme, that contributes to lead a powerful wall of sound in unison with the organ around 1.20 minutes. The song, then, turns into intricate dialogues between vibraphone and clarinet, alternating with the distant wails by bass sax: in the middle, organ and winds coming out in an almost artificial, fragmented and zigzagging way, occasionally trying to outline an unison theme to give direction to the drumbeat. On the other hand, the second disc live performance of Denti manages to be more powerful than the one on the record ending with a quote of one of most popular tunes by italian prog icons Banco del Mutuo Soccorso, Canto Nomade per un Prigioniero Politico. There’s really no surprise here as Paolo Botta talks about his influences like this: when I started listening to prog I was just around my seventeens. [Banco del Mutuo Soccorso’s] Nocenzi brothers and Gianni Leone from Il Balletto di Bronzo played a key role in my development. This triangle definitely pushed me in the way to look for a certain type of keyboard and sounds. Later I met Canterbury, whose organ, wah and fuzz sounds were one of my obsessions. I don’t know how many fuzz boxes, distortions, wahs I tested to get to such thing, maybe not using them, but only for the desire to understand where that mixture of sound came from, that kind of color, which I still find primarily interesting. And when speaking about influences, SKE indicates one keyboard player among the Canterbury school, who is Alan Gowen, as a primary influence. First in the jazz-rock pioneers Gilgamesh, then with National Health counterparting Dave Stewart, Gowen had a softer and interesting harmonic phrasing -he says.

I don’t think that rock in opposition makes the inaccessibility of listening an end of itself

Rock in opposition bands and avant-garde impacted him in a later stage. Carta e Burro gives drummer’s frustration a relief with a chamber variation more in the style of Henry Cow. Roberta Pagani‘s lyrical singing moves away from the harsh and stinging vocals by Dagmar Krause contributing to a more intimate, even if still austere, mood. Fender Rhodes’s bare score drives the intro interacting with Toussaint‘s marimba and setting a stark avant-garde vaguely atonal music environment. The abrupt entry of a Wurlitzer boogie and the comeback of voice gives way to the sax taking the stage. If it all started from a sort of Henry Cow‘s rigorous stem of avantgardism, then it ended in Aksak Maboul‘s dadaism. I discovered contemporay classical while being Yugen memberSKE says. I’m listening to [contemporary classical] records more out of curiosity. I like to understand what the composing idea was about rather than listening to how they are played […] In this sense it is an infinite bucket of, even radicals, ideas that I like to know, and how they have been developed and maybe trying to incorporate them in those things I play. Three chamber interludes, Scogli is divided in three parts and explore this reserve of composing ideas. In the first excerpt a small ensemble made of marimba, guitar, synth with glockenspiel effect and bass clarinet intertwine a sort of wonky dance – according to Cipollone‘s dotted quarter bass it seems like crooked tango- until SKE‘s ARP Odyssey adds a melody over the articulated counterpoint rhythmic layer. The second opens, instead, with an unusual scale played by Maurizio Fasoli at piano. SKE‘s classic approach is a playful descent into this reserve of ideas: the first scale by the piano is a sort of interpretation of a dodecaphonic approach, let’s say serial. I gave myself a series. The series itself comes from a mathematical approach. Each note has a semitone more than the previous interval. So the first interval is a semitone, the second interval a tone, the third interval a tone and a half and so on. The result of this is a scale that does not have a tonal harmonic inclination. It’s just a sequence. The creative mechanism always strives to find a new musical pathway, rather than being an end in itself. I could not expect that, when the song was written out of a rigid mathematical process and the moment I played it back there was a note, a chord that sounded wrong, I didn’t hesitate to correct it. Because, during this project preparation, I always gave my instinct priority when deciding what to keep and what to change during the last listening before the go.

A kind of hidden floor, covered in a hypothetical register below the bass, it’s that “filter of emotion”. Everything has been evaluated like I was listening from a certain distance, in the other room  – he says referring to how 1000 Autunni was created. This probably  increased the weight of the post-rock influence, maybe highlighting the emotional side, the emotion in a melody or the color of a certain musical phrase or motif, rather than the integrity of the writing process meant in a standard way. Some post-rock records impacted writing 1000 Autunni; for example one of the most iconic and genre-defining albums such as Hex by Bark Psychosis, that still holds a kind of prog style: that disc, apart from the sound production, that is stratospheric, has a completely unusual balance between drums and bass tracks. It is all focused on enjoyment and not on mimicking consolidated styles. Beyond this it is very interesting because it is made of very simple ideas, with a polymetric approach that is definitely unusual. And it works very well with that kind of music. From that point of view, I do not find any difference with a record that we can easily fit into rock progressive label. Sotto sotto is one of the most post-rock influenced tracks in 1000 Autunni. A slow loop – much more in the style of Mogwai rather than Bark Psychosis – draws a solid mood on which all the instruments’ layers slowly develop their patterns. It is placed in the middle of the album representing a moment of highest standstill of the kinetic force expressed in the initial tracks.

Contemporary classical is an infinite bucket of, even radical, ideas that I like to know, I like to know how they have been developed and maybe trying to incorporate them in those things I play

Building complex music in the prog context involves facing the risk of becoming an intellectual high-brow; so, the daring musician decides whether to face, compromise or avoid the risk of music that is inaccessible on purpose. Or maybe it’s not a genuine problem even in rock in opposition, in the most radical wing of prog. The question remains, is it possible to practice experimenting and to write accessible music at the same time? I don’t think that rock in opposition makes the inaccessibility of listening an end of itself – SKE argues – or rock in opposition bands look for it on purpose. I think it is more alleged than real. In reality, the ear gets used much more than we could imagine. […] I don’t believe that one day anyone will tap their feet to Henry Cow. I’m not an idealist nor crazy. But I don’t think that this music was born with the intention of playing inaccessible. I think it is more the result of a research process that takes into account the writing styles, which so few audiences tried to approach so far. But I would give time to this process. Frequently Paolo Botta points at how each music is the result of the moment in which the artist played it. In this sense, it makes very little sense to talk about accessibility or not of music in comparison to talking about how much a record reflects the time of the artist who made it.

I don’t know how many fuzz boxes, distortions, wahs I tested to get to such thing, maybe not using them, but only for the desire to understand where that mixture of sound came from, that kind of color, which I still find primarily interesting

1001 Autunni still sounds extremely new, despite the seven years passed and despite a wide usage of a vintage 70s equipment: I’ve always been obsessed about how to manipulate sounds, until I completely revert them into something unexpected. In my opinion this is working according to the 70s using tools that nobody had in the 70s. It’s uneasy to find a 70s record sounding like this, but this because of today’s technology more than my personal expertise. I am very lucky to adore this stuff, but in 2018. The preparation of this reprint lasted a couple of years before the release. SKE is now writing the tracks for a second solo album: I found myself wanting to take time to this project and to rediscover the magic I found during that time. In my opinion music first reflects people, but it is a daughter of that time. Music elicits personal memories. When I listen to certain music, it reminds me of places and events. Those things are impossible to forget, because it’s the way people store the harmonies, melodies, timbres, colors of music in the brain. Therefore, I think it’s right to let certain moments chance to unearth musical landscapes. And again about an upcoming album: it’s a positive moment. I’m writing things I’m very satisfied with. For a long time I didn’t want to write anything for SKE projects because the songs I was starting to think looked a little too much like what I had already done. And I did not like this. Instead, now I think I found an idea that stimulates me and gives me the limits. Limits play a key role for every creative output. Any honest artist putting himself or herself honestly towards artistic creation is always troubled by having a blank sheet in front of, it is more difficult to create; if, instead, there’s something in the middle of the sheet, there is a line that says ‘you have to stay here or you have to stay there’, the artist will makes less effort. This is the type of situation that is giving me stakes, they are useful both in terms of helping the mood, both in terms of writing music. Putting stakes, which function as a fixed point from which to spring ideas – a mechanism kind of related with minimalist aesthetics – and that can facilitate experimentation: once the idea is set, I let the imagination run. So, if I think that an instrument might work in a particular song, I will ask myself where to find this instrument in a later stage. I can anticipate that there will be guests different than those in the first record. It is a thing linked with this moment, in the sense that in some passages that I wrote there is a certain instrument. I have already contacted the person and I decided to write knowing who the player will be. It is important to give people the right space. At the moment I also have many other ideas on collaborations and question marks. […] There are at least 15 minutes already written. Some things will recur and some things I have already decided.

Talking about an album, describing the mix of its ingredients is misleading if not giving required relevance to the cooking process that makes the difference out of it. Yet Paolo Botta holds no secret of the ingredients he cooks with and, musically speaking, of his debts with the past. In the second disc in addition to the previously mentioned quote of Banco del Mutuo Soccorso, there’s a Talking Drums (originally by King Crimson) perfectly fitting with Mummia, and a third featuring -this time hidden in the tracklist. It’s Van der Graaf Generator‘s Man-Erg at the end of Lo Struzzo e un Buio, the only previously unreleased song contained in the 2013 live act. When it’s the time to list references or ideas [in 1000 Autunni] that recall this or that band, those references were clear to me and made on purpose. I like being able to cook using ingredients that belong to others, which are common in other cuisines. Without surrendering to a quotation only style, without adhering to a sterile use of vintage revival instruments, without falling into the trap of the juxtaposition between music for the mind against music for the body, 1001 Autunni is a record that still does not sound like a reprint, but as a an innovative record still today. Maybe because it did not just sit on juxtaposing the two different music types, but embraced both.

SKE
1001 Autunni

1000 Autunni

01 Fraguglie
02 Denti
03 Carta e Burro
04 Scrupoli
05 Del Ta
06 Scogli 1
07 Sotto Sotto
08 Mummia
09 Scogli 2
10 La Nefazia di Multatuli
11 Scogli 3
12 Rassegnati

Paolo Ske Botta: composizione, organi, piani elettrici, sintetizzatori, string machines ed effetti
Fabio Ciro Ceriani: sansula, percussioni
Valerio Cipollone: clarinets, saxes
Enrica Di Bastiano: harp
Maurizio Fasoli: piano
Elia Leon Mariani: violin
Nicolas Nikolopoulos: flute
Giuseppe Jos Olivini: theremin, percussions, effects
Roberta Pagani: vocals
Valerio Neth Reina: vocals
Mattia Signò: drums
Markus Stauss: saxes
Fabrice Toussaint: vibrafones, trombone, percussions
Pierre Wawrzyniak: bass
Francesco Zago: guitars

LIVE ALTROCK FEST 2013

01 Fraguglie
02 Del Ta
03 Scogli 1
04 Denti
05 Mummia
06 Sotto Sotto
07 Lo Struzzo e un Buio
08 Rassegnati

Paolo SKE Botta Keys, Binson, Glockenspiel, Bullshits
Valerio Cipollone soprano and bass clarinets, Toy Piano
Jacopo Costa Vibrafone
Mattia Signò Drums, Glockenspiel
Pierre Wawrzyniak Bass
Francesco Zago El.Guitar, Toy Piano

Versione in italiano

Contrapporre, come facevano i Soft Machine nelle note di copertina di Volume Two, la “musica per il corpo e la musica per la mente”, è stato funzionale all’apoteosi intellettuale di tanto rock progressive, ed in un certo senso alla sua fine. Ancora oggi essere legati al prog, ancora di più agli stili più sperimentali del rock in opposition, suona come un’implicita adesione ad una dimensione intellettuale contrapposta alla corporalità del rock. Creare contrapposizioni è una chiave per rafforzare un’identità culturale, ma anche per avere dei disertori a cui piace scavalcare la trincea. Al tastierista Paolo SKE Botta è piaciuto artisticamente fraternizzare con il nemico nel suo primo lavoro solista, uscito nel 2011 a nome 1000 Autunni e ristampato nel 2018, non accontentandosi di fare musica solo per la mente, ma aggiungendo uno spessore corporale alle sue partiture. L’orecchio potrà pure prestare attenzione alle linee stratificate e ritmicamente complesse e agli arrangiamenti ricercati, che richiamano il rock in opposition di fine anni ’70 e la musica da camera, ma anche la scuola di Canterbury, passando per Gentle Giant e Banco del Mutuo Soccorso, fino alle più recenti inflessioni del progressive scandinavo. Insomma, prestare attenzione ad un insieme magmatico con l’impronta forte e ben precisa di un lavoro pensato. Eppure qualcosa mancherà all’appello: sotto la rete della mente l’orecchio scava, come in una nebbia, e trova un’atmosfera sottilmente emotiva, che mira dritta a solleticare la curiosità corporale e istintiva.

Tendo a dare uguale importanza all’atto cervellotico della composizione ed all’atto istintivo dell’ascolto dice Paolo SKE Botta. Negli ultimi dieci anni ha costruito una carriera nel progressive d’avanguardia con un sound molto personale che giocasse su entrambi i piani del corpo e della mente. SKE -questo moniker è ormai indistinguibile dal suo nome di battesimo- ha un armamentario feroce di synth, rigorosamente anni ’70, che declina in maniera innovativa a cavallo tra vintage ed avanguardia. Si è legato a collaborazioni con la scena della musica d’avanguardia, del prog, e con l’etichetta AltrOck di Marcello Marinone: con i Picchio dal Pozzo, uno dei gruppi più ingiustamente misconosciuti del prog italiano, ha suonato dal vivo in occasione del loro ritorno sulla scena negli anni 2000 e nell’album A_Live del 2010. Ha partecipato ai lavori degli Homunculus Res, dei greci Ciccada, dei francesi Camembert. Ma ha legato il suo nome sopratutto a due gruppi Not a Good Sign Yugen. I primi sono la sua creatura: un equilibrio tra progressive contemporaneo in formato canzone e sperimentazione, i Not a Good Sign giocano su ciò che suona aspettato inserendo elementi perfidamente solleticanti di inaspettato, virtuosismi ritmici, slittamenti minimalisti, derive polimetriche. Hanno pubblicato quest’anno il loro lavoro più complesso, ovvero Icebound.

Yugen é, invece, uno dei gruppi più estremi della musica contemporanea, non solo etichettabile come prog. Un organico ipercameristico di strumenti acustici ed elettrici, ideato dal chitarrista Francesco Zago e dal produttore Marcello Marinone come ensemble esteso e variabile, Yugen mischia l’estremismo dell’avanguardia classica –Conlon Nancarrow è uno dei riferimenti- con le linee freddamente feroci, aggressive dell’avant progressive. Sperimentazione compositiva unita al virtuosismo esecutivo di partiture intricatissime, che trovano spazio in preziose attività live, rare per via delle dimensioni spropositate dell’ensemble. Una su tutte, quella al festival di Rock in Opposition del 201, è ripresa in Romantic Warriors II: A Progressive Music Saga About Rock in Opposition. Un’attestazione importante, visto che questo è il documentario di riferimento sulla storia del rock in opposition.

Tendo a dare uguale importanza all’atto cervellotico della composizione ed all’atto istintivo dell’ascolto

Oggi ristampato con un numerale in più nel titolo –1001 invece che 1000– e l’aggiunta di un’esibizione live del 2013, al momento dell’uscita nel 2011 andò immediatamente fuori stampa ed è un disco di culto tra gli ascoltatori di prog d’avanguardia. La storia di 1000 Autunni è fortemente legata all’avventura con Yugen. Molti i musicisti che SKE ha preso in prestito dall’ensemble per il suo lavoro: Francesco Zago alla chitarra e Valerio Cipollone ai clarinetti, Mattia Signò alla batteria, Maurizio Fasoli al pianoforte, Elia Mariani al violino, Giuseppe Olivini alle percussioni.  A questi si sono aggiunti musicisti già in area AltrOck come Pierre Wawrzyniak al basso e Pierre Toussaint al trombone, entrambi in forza nei CamembertNikolas Nikolopoulos dei Ciccada al flauto, oltre a Markus Stauss al sax, Enrica Di Bastiano all’arpa e le voci di Roberta Pagani e Valerio Reina. In quel periodo, a parte progetti vari, il grosso delle mie collaborazioni musicali era con i musicisti di Yugen. Questo penso che si veda sia nell’approccio all’arrangiamento sia nell’impiego dei musicisti. Ci sono molti musicisti che hanno fatto parte di Yugen. Al di là delle esigenze più musicali, dove magari in alcuni brani decidevo che mi serviva questo o quell’altro strumento, diciamo che ho cercato di valorizzare le persone con cui sapevo di riuscire a lavorare bene. Racconta SKE di aver creato 1000 Autunni nel periodo 2009-2010, nello stesso periodo in cui stava partecipando ad Iridule, un lavoro capitale per Yugen: ci ho messo un anno a scriverlo [1000 Autunni]. L’ho scritto ed arrangiato completamente tra Aprile 2009 ed Aprile 2010 e poi registrato da Aprile a Dicembre 2010. I due lavori sono legati tra loro da un filo rosso: Iridule è il mio disco preferito di Yugen, stiamo parlando di un disco a cui sono molto legato. Ma dal punto di vista compositivo Iridule e 1000 Autunni sono estremamente diversi. Si parte da presupposti diversi. Iridule è un album di smembramento, un album che decompone. Invece 1000 Autunni è un album che ricompone, dal mio punto di vista. Non che Iridule sia scolastico in alcuna maniera: diciamo che c’é un filtro di cuore a cui tengo molto in 1000 Autunni.

SKE lavora su questa direzione, tracciando linee che partono dalla struttura ed arrivano all’istinto. Fraguglie è probabilmente il pezzo che mette più in evidenza questo meccanismo. Aprono il brano una serie di arpeggi discendenti dell’Hammond marcati da poderosi power chords distorti della chitarra elettrica, indecisa tra il sottolineare il battito o romperlo, mentre la batteria cerca disperatamente di trovare un beat al quale appigliarsi. Nelle pause inserite in questa pioggia l’elettrica, stavolta in pulito, dialoga con il flauto, tra vari slittamenti di accenti minimalistici, finché il ritmo sembra rimanere quasi stabile e permettere l’ingresso degli ampi piani di mellotron a creare un senso di scioglimento. Dopo un minuto e mezzo la pausa a questo inferno meccanico è pastorale, epica. Lascia spazio alle linee malinconiche del clarinetto ed al suono modulare del Binson. Ma è solo una pausa apparente: ancora l’aggressività sale ed in mezzo ad una pioggia di frammenti, tra linee suddivise in complessi contrappunti, spuntano richiami al prog classico, come ad esempio un’arrampicata improvvisa con l’organo alla Hugh Banton in bell’evidenza a graffiare in controtempo. Nella parte finale i synth tornano a dialogare con sax a clarinetto in un crescendo, prima di lasciare spazio alle tastiere per un misterioso finale. Ogni volta che nel pezzo ci si ferma ad ascoltare la struttura, subito si viene trascinati da uno strappo, da un eco ad un mondo istintuale. La complessità dell’organico, con tastiere, vibratoni e fiati a dialogare in linee intricate e matematiche richiama gli eccessi virtuosistici a livello compositivo sia dei Gentle Giant sia di tanto avant-prog contemporaneo. Ma anche sperimentazioni al di fuori del prog, come quelle dei norvegesi Jaga Jazzist. SKE a proposito della traccia d’apertura: la sensazione di traffico che puoi percepire all’inizio di Fraguglie è figlia di un procedimento di stratificazione, nel senso di ricostruzione di vario materiale, in maniera da riuscire a preservare le caratteristiche peculiari senza farne perdere l’identità. Dovresti riuscire a seguire nella mia testa il discorso dei vari strumenti. Questi fanno dei percorsi indipendenti e non rovinano quel disegno generale che risalta ad un ascolto un po’ meno approfondito.

I batteristi mi chiedono ‘mettimi ogni tanto una cassa dritta’, ma sto imparando a mettere le casse dritte!

Mi trovo spesso a discutere con i batteristi delle possibilità poco utilizzate della batteria di riuscire a procedere su binari diversi con i vari pezzi, che è un lavoro che piace moltissimo. Mi ricorda il minimalismo, però mi piace applicarlo alla batteria. Da questo concetto scaturiscono le polimetrie che vengono riportate nelle sezioni più ritmiche degli strumenti. Togliendo la batteria o facendola entrare ad effetto, vanno a creare contrappunti meramente ritmici e non necessariamente armonici e melodici. […] Questo mi fa odiare dai batteristi che mi chiedono ‘mettimi ogni tanto una cassa dritta’. Ma sto imparando a mettere le casse dritte! L’esecuzione dal vivo di Fraguglie, eseguita all’AltrOck festival due anni dopo l’uscita dell’album nel 2013 con un organico ridotto rispetto all’originale, fa respirare i batteristi. L’intro stavolta ha un groove quasi più rilassato, giocata su un tempo leggermente indietro, e lascia spazio ad una lunga sezione improvvisativa in cui hammond, chitarra e clarinetti dialogano sopra un tempo veloce da jazz-rock anni ’70. Il pezzo è diviso a metà, stavolta con una seconda parte che rimane ancora più sospesa, interrotta quasi improvvisamente dal ritorno della struttura più complessa e scritta e dalle intricate poliritmie in coda al pezzo. Questi giochi rimtici sono uno dei tratti distintivi della composizione di SKE: l’interesse per le poliritmie è tradotto in sovrapposizioni di strumenti che seguono figurazioni ritmiche continue, ripetute, ma che posizionano accenti in punti diversi. La si può sentire in vari punti di Fraguglie, ma anche usate estensivamente dai Not a Good Sign -un esempio la strofa di Wait for me dal secondo album. In maniera interessante l’effetto drammatico funziona in maniera molto simile sia nel suo album solista che nei Not a Good Sign tramite un senso di sospensione e spostamento dell’attenzione, dell’ascolto -in questo caso vicino a certe composizioni del minimalismo di Steve Reich. Un passaggio delle parole di SKE va in questa direzione, nel senso di collegare questo dispositivo compositivo ad un effetto emozionale, quando dice: Sono un fan delle atmosfere del minimalismo in generale, e delle atmosfere sognanti, morbide. Sono un super malinconicone!

Le atmosfere malinconiche e sognanti, che in questi anni hanno spesso avvicinato questo lavoro al progressive scandinavo, Änglagård su tutti, aprono Denti. Una melodia semplice di quattro note, appena malinconica e non risolta, varia ritmicamente mentre rimbalza dal sax basso di Stauss al vibrafono di Toussaint. L’hammond in contemporanea si muove tra tempi sempre diversi. Ma è il mellotron il protagonista dei passaggi chiave del brano: nell’intro richiama un tappeto di flauti e poi -come riportato nel dettagliatissimo booklet- con l’entrata del secondo tema, lo strumento suona come un russian choir per creare un poderoso muro sonoro all’unisono con l’organo intorno ad 1.20. Il pezzo, quindi, vira improvvisamente in intricati dialoghi tra vibrafono e clarinetto, alternati ad echi di sax basso: in mezzo, spuntando organo e fiati in maniera quasi posticcia, frammentata e zigzagante, provando ogni tanto a delineare un tema all’unisono ed a dare una direzione alla batteria. L’esecuzione live in alcuni momenti riesce ad essere più potente di quella del disco e termina con una citazione del tema iniziale di Canto Nomade per un Prigioniero Politico del Banco del Mutuo Soccorso. Non sorprende Paolo Botta parlare delle proprie influenze così: quando ho cominciato ad ascoltare il prog ero poco meno che maggiorenne. Una grossissima influenza me l’hanno data i fratelli Nocenzi e Gianni Leone del Balletto di Bronzo. Questo triangolo sicuramente m’ha spinto tanto a ricercare tastiere di un certo tipo e un suono di un certo tipo. In seguito ho conosciuto anche il Canterbury. Sicuramente i suoni di organo, wah e fuzzati della scuola di Canterbury sono stati uno dei miei pallini fissi. Non so quanti fuzzer, distorsori vari, wah vari ho provato per riuscire ad arrivare ad una cosa del genere, magari non utilizzandoli, ma solo per il desiderio di capire dove arrivava quella pasta lì, quel tipo di colore, che trovo tutt’oggi molto interessante. E sempre a proposito di influenze, tra i tastieristi SKE indica uno tra tutti nella scuola di Canterbury, Alan Gowen. Prima nei Gilgamesh, storica formazione jazz-rock, poi con i National Health dove faceva da contraltare a Dave Stewart, Gowen aveva un fraseggio più morbido e più interessante armonicamente.

Non penso che il rock in opposition faccia dell’inaccessibilità dell’ascolto un fine

Ma tra le influenze non può mancare il rock in opposition -un’influenza arrivata in una fase più tarda rispetto alle altre citate per Paolo– ed il suo legame con la musica d’avanguardia. Carta e Burro rappresenta una pausa ai tormenti del batterista, una deriva cameristica che richiama gli Henry Cow. Il delicato cantato lirico di Roberta Pagani non è quello lacerato di Dagmar Krause, qui l’atmosfera è più intima. L’intro guidata dal Fender Rhodes che dialoga con la marimba di Toussaint richiama un’austerità da musica atonale d’avanguardia, prima che l’ingresso di un boogie del Wurlitzer veda la voce lasciare il posto al sax -uno scarto che in un certo senso é come passare dalla sperimentazione degli Henry Cow al dadaismo degli Aksak Maboul. L’outro riprende il tema iniziale con di nuovo la voce lirica di Pagani. Ho scoperto la classica contemporanea militando in Yugen -dice SKE. Ci sono dischi [di classica contemporanea] che vado ad ascoltare più per curiosità e ci sono cose di cui mi piace più comprendere l’idea compositiva piuttosto che ascoltarne la realizzazione […] In questo senso è un serbatoio infinito di idee, anche radicali, che mi piace conoscere, sapere che sono state utilizzate e perché no provare ad utilizzarle in cose che ho fatto. Tre intermezzi cameristici, le tre parti di Scogli, esplorano questo serbatoio di idee compositive. Nella prima marimba, chitarra, synth con effetto glockenspiel e clarinetto basso intrecciano una specie di danza sbilenca -quasi un tango storto sentendo l’accompagnamento puntato di Cipollone– prima che l’ARP Odyssey di Botta vada ad aggiungere una melodia sopra l’articolato contrappunto ritmico. La seconda si apre, invece, con una scala decisamente inusuale del pianoforte di Maurizio Fasoli. L’approccio alla classica di SKE è una discesa nel serbatoio di idee: la prima scala che si sente al pianoforte è una sorta di interpretazione di un approccio dodecafonico, diciamo seriale. Mi sono dato una serie. La serie stessa è figlia di un piccolo ragionamento matematico, nel senso che ogni nota ha un semitono in più dell’intervallo precedente. Quindi il primo intervallo un semitono, il secondo intervallo un tono, il terzo intervallo un tono e mezzo e via così. Il risultato di questo è una scala che non ha un’inclinazione armonica tonale. E’ semplicemente una sequenza. Il meccanismo compositivo rimane sempre nella dimensione della scoperta di una nuova via musicale, piuttosto che fine a sé stesso. La cosa di cui non mi sono fatto remore è che, nel momento in cui il brano veniva composto da un procedimento matematico rigido e nel momento in cui lo riascoltavo c’era una nota, un accordo che suonava particolarmente sbagliato, non mi son fatto nessuna remora a correggerlo. Perché l’ultimo ascolto, per quanto riguarda questo progetto, l’ho sempre fatto col cuore. 

Un sostrato, una specie di pavimento nascosto in un ipotetico registro al di sotto di quello del basso, così si può immaginare questo filtro emozionale. Tutto è stato condensato -dice riferendosi alla composizione di 1000 Autunnicercando di utilizzare la tecnica dell’ascolto con l’orecchio esterno, l’orecchio nell’altra stanza. Questo probabilmente va ad accentuare l’influenza post-rock, quindi magari più legata al sentimento, all’emozione alla melodia o al colore che ha una determinata una frase musicale o un brano, piuttosto che dell’integralità del processo di scrittura come scrivere o comporre inteso come classicoC’é nel lavoro l’influenza di alcune cose post-rock più di altre; ad esempio Hex dei Bark Psychosis, un lavoro tra i punti di riferimento del genere, eppure dotato di una certa inflessione prog: quel disco, a parte la produzione sonora che è stratosferica che ha un equilibrio del tutto inusuale tra pezzi della batteria e del basso, che é tutta mirata sul godimento e non su stilemi consolidati. Al di là di questo fatto é molto interessante perché riesce a veicolare delle idee tutto sommato semplici, con un approccio polimetrico che è decisamente inusitato. E funziona molto molto bene con quel tipo di musica. Da quel punto di vista non ci trovo alcuna differenza con un disco che possiamo far rientrare un po’ più agevolmente in un‘etichetta progressiva. Scegliendo un pezzo di 1001 Autunni più rappresentativo di questo spirito, Sotto sotto ha un andamento decisamente post-rock. Un loop lento -quasi più Mogwai piuttosto che Bark Psychosis– malinconico e atmosferico su cui tutti gli strumenti stratificano piano a piano le loro linee, piazzato nel centro dell’album rappresenta il momento di massimo stasi della forza cinetica espressa nei primi brani e che lentamente andava rallentando. 

La classica contemporanea è un serbatoio infinito di idee, anche radicali, che mi piace conoscere, sapere che sono state utilizzate e perché no provare ad utilizzarle in cose che ho fatto

Costruire musica complessa in ambito prog comporta scontrarsi con il rischio di una deriva intellettualistica; allora il musicista deve decidere se affrontare, scendere a compromessi o evitare il rischio di una musica di proposito inaccessibile. O forse è un falso problema anche nel rock in opposition, nella parte più militante del prog. Rimane di fondo la domanda, è possibile sperimentare e comporre musica accessibile allo stesso tempo? Non penso che il rock in opposition faccia dell’inaccessibilità dell’ascolto un fine -dice SKE non penso che venga ricercata l’inaccessibilità dell’ascolto. Penso che sia molto presunta. In realtà l’orecchio si abitua molto più di quanto potremmo immaginare. […] Non ho la pia illusione che un giorno chiunque ascolti gli Henry Cow schioccando le dita. Non sono un idealista e neanche pazzo. Ma non credo che quella musica sia nata con l’intento di suonare inaccessibile. Penso che sia più il risultato di una ricerca che tiene in considerazione degli stilemi compositivi, che sono talmente poco percorsi nel tipo di ascolto che abbiamo noi o il pubblico dell’epoca da risultare talmente fuori, indigesta, impenetrabile. Ma io mi darei del tempo. Più volte Paolo Botta sottolinea come ogni opera sia frutto del momento in cui l’artista l’ha suonata. In questo senso, ha davvero poco senso parlare di accessibilità o meno della musica, magari piuttosto se un’opera rifletta il tempo del suo artista. 

Non so quanti fuzzer, distorsori vari, wah vari ho provato per riuscire ad arrivare ad una cosa del genere, magari non utilizzandoli, ma solo per il desiderio di capire dove arrivava quella pasta lì, quel tipo di colore, che trovo tutt’oggi molto interessante

1001 Autunni è ancora estremamente nuovo, nonostante i sette anni passati e nonostante l’utilizzo di strumenti siano risalenti agli anni ’70: il trattamento del suono è sempre stato un mio pallino, tanto da stravolgere i suoni da cui parto. Secondo me è uno spirito molto anni ‘70 con dei mezzi che i ‘70 non avevano. Una resa del genere da un disco che è degli anni ‘70 è difficile trovarla, ma per motivi di tecnologia più di perizia personale. Sono molto fortunato ad adorare questi timbri, però nel 2018. Al momento della tribolata ristampa, che ha atteso un paio d’anni prima di vedere la luce, SKE sta lavorando a scrivere i pezzi di un secondo album solista: ho ritrovato voglia di incastrare e ritrovare la magia che avevo trovato in quel periodo. Secondo me la musica prima rispecchia le persone, ma è figlia di un periodo. La musica nasconde i ricordi. Quando sento determinate musiche mi ricordano luoghi ed eventi e quelle cose sono indelebili, perché è la maniera in cui le persone immagazzinano nel cervello le armonie, le melodie, i timbri, i colori della musica e, quindi, penso che sia giusto anche dare la maniera a determinati periodi della vita la possibilità di sfogarsi in paesaggi musicali che vai magari a comporre in quel momento. Ed ancora sul nuovo album: è un periodo buono: sto scrivendo cose delle quali sono molto soddisfatto. Per molto tempo non ho voluto metter giù niente per SKE perchè le cose che cominciavo a pensare assomigliavano un po’ troppo a quello che già avevo fatto. E questo cosa non mi piaceva. Invece, adesso penso di aver trovato un’idea che mi stimola e che mi da i limiti. Per una creazione di qualsiasi tipo i limiti sono molto importanti. Qualsiasi artista che si ponga in maniera onesta verso la creazione artistica se ha un foglio bianco e basta davanti, fa più fatica; invece, se ha una situazione in cui in mezzo al foglio c’é una linea che dice ‘tu devi stare di qua o tu devi stare di là’, ne fa meno di fatica. Questo tipo di situazione che ho trovato sulla quale lavorare mi sta dando dei paletti, che mi stanno servendo un sacco sia a livello di mood, sia a livello di costruzione compositiva. Porsi dei paletti, che funzionino da punto fermo da cui far scaturire le idee -un meccanismo apparentato all’estetica minimalista- e che può facilitare la sperimentazione:  una volta che l’idea è impostata, tendo a lasciare che la fantasia corra. Quindi, se ritengo che uno strumento possa funzionare in un determinato brano, mi porrò dopo il problema di trovare questo strumento. Posso anticipare che ci saranno degli ospiti anche diversi rispetto al primo disco. E’ una cosa circostanziale, nel senso che in alcuni brani che ho scritto c’é un determinato strumento. Ho già contattato la persona e ho deciso di scrivere sapendo chi sarà la persona che suonerà lo strumento. Anche quella è una cosa importante per dare lo spazio giusto alle persone. Al momento ho anche tanti altre idee su collaborazioni e punti interrogativi. […] Ci sono almeno 15 minuti già definito e scritto. Alcune caratteristiche sono sicuro che ricorreranno ed alcune cose le ho già decise. 

Parlare di un album descrivendo il mix dei suoi ingredienti è fuorviante, perché dimentica quel processo di cottura che fa la differenza della chef. Eppure Paolo Botta non fa mistero degli ingredienti che usa e, musicalmente parlando, dei suoi debiti con il passato. Ne è testimonianza il secondo disco live di questa ristampa dove, oltre alla citazione del Banco, compare una Talking Drums dei King Crimson mischiata con il brano Mummia, ed una citazione ancora più nascosta. E’ quella di Man-Erg dei Van der Graaf Generator alla fine di Lo Struzzo e un Buio, unico brano originale nel live del 2013. Nel momento in cui si sentono dei riferimenti o richiami o idee che richiamano questo o quel gruppo, sono assolutamente consci ed evoluti. Mi piace riuscire a cucinare utilizzando degli ingredienti che sono di altri, che sono caratteristici di altre cucine. Senza scadere nella citazionismo, senza scadere nell’uso sterile di strumenti vintage da revival, senza cadere nella trappola della contrapposizione tra musica per la mente o musica per il corpo, 1001 Autunni rimane un disco che ancora oggi non suona come una ristampa, ma come un prodotto innovativo. Forse proprio perché non si è fermato nella distinzione tra corpo e mente, ma ha seguito entrambi i percorsi.

SKE
1001 Autunni

1000 Autunni

01 Fraguglie
02 Denti
03 Carta e Burro
04 Scrupoli
05 Del Ta
06 Scogli 1
07 Sotto Sotto
08 Mummia
09 Scogli 2
10 La Nefazia di Multatuli
11 Scogli 3
12 Rassegnati

Paolo Ske Botta: composizione, organi, piani elettrici, sintetizzatori, string machines ed effetti
Fabio Ciro Ceriani: sansula, percussioni
Valerio Cipollone: clarinetti e sassofoni
Enrica Di Bastiano: arpa
Maurizio Fasoli: pianoforte
Elia Leon Mariani: violino
Nicolas Nikolopoulos: flauto
Giuseppe Jos Olivini: theremin, percussioni, effetti
Roberta Pagani: voce
Valerio Neth Reina: voce
Mattia Signò: batteria
Markus Stauss: sassofoni
Fabrice Toussaint: idiofoni, trombone, percussioni
Pierre Wawrzyniak: basso
Francesco Zago: chitarre acustiche ed elettriche

LIVE ALTROCK FEST 2013

01 Fraguglie
02 Del Ta
03 Scogli 1
04 Denti
05 Mummia
06 Sotto Sotto
07 Lo Struzzo e un Buio
08 Rassegnati

Paolo SKE Botta Tastiere, Binson, Glockenspiel, Cazzate
Valerio Cipollone Clarinetto soprano / basso, Toy Piano
Jacopo Costa Vibrafono
Mattia Signò Batteria, Glockenspiel
Pierre Wawrzyniak Basso
Francesco Zago Chitarra elettrica, Toy Piano

Trio HLK – Standard Time [Ubuntu Music 2018]

Interview + review in August and September 2018

Italian version below

Two landmark experts of contemporary music like Alex Ross and Nate Chinen published at almost same time two stories connected by an hidden thread. The former beginning from the rapper Kendrick Lamar being awarded the Pulitzer prize, traditionally reserved to classical composers, to trigger a discussion on the status of contemporary classical music; the latter contextualizing a 2009 anecdote, the backfiring coming from Kurt Rosenwinkel in direction of Vijay Iyer as the pianist was awarded of a MacArthur grant. Apparently linked only by the fray between musical personalities theme, they are instead reflecting and discussing on a deeper level the relationship between tradition and any so-called avantgarde in music. Both of those resonated to me when meeting few days later with the groundbreaking Trio HLK, who just released their debut Standard Time. The title is a clear reference to standards and how to play them today, while in slightly different fashion, not exactly as a novice swing trio would. As Ant Law, one third of the trio on guitars, says it loud and clear the title is supposed to be a little provocative for us to say: this how you did it then, maybe we can do it like this now!

Not sure this is exactly the way an old school player would play Blue in Green or The Way You Look Tonight. Or at least hire the Edinburgh based trio to play jazz standards with. Even considering this trio seems to play everything, but jazz. Put an heavy usage of polyrhythms together with a jazz and classical background in a complex and inter knotted tapestry, driven by the connection of drummer Richard Kass, pianist Richard Harrold and guitarist Ant Law. The three are unloading a powerful mixture of subtle delicacy together with an inner strenght. A sort of djent jazz, or maybe contemporary polyrhythmic music, or maybe a math rock bop. Everything in Standard Time is around the rhythm. It is obviously the most primal thing. Any human being kind of experience, from the first sensation of your heartbeat of your mother’s heartbeat when being in the womb, the polyrhythm of the two heartbeats tells Ant LawStill this element is merely a starting point. They are not focusing on rhythm as a mean for itself. Instead as a direction to the true core of their search, which is the perception of the rhythm. Compositionally a lot of the tunes kind of play around with the perception of time, the perception of rhythm. A lot of things are kind of being stretched. A bit that might be conventionally, might be distorted to stretch the rhythm to compress the rhythm, about playing around with the perception of time, says Richard Harrold.

The title Standard Time is supposed to be a little provocative for us to say: this how you did it then, maybe we can do it like this now!

Trio HLK was born when Richard Kass and Richard Harrold met in Edinburgh and started developing a commong ground for a polyrhythmic exploration. As they were wanting to work as a trio, and looking to unconventionally fit the last third of the line-up with a guitarist, they met Ant Law on 2015 new year’s eve and decided to play together. If new years’s day good intentions for upcoming year are never the basis of something concrete -losing weight plans?, this is evidently the exception that proves the rule. Richard Kass remembers how they transitioned from a duo to a trio based line-up: we just started playing together and Richard Harrold had some musics he’d written and I liked that. There was some stuff in there which I’d start to get into, some micro rhythmical ideas which were kind of aligned with things I was interested and I was kind of really into. We sort of had a couple of other people as third members, which I didn’t feel they worked out. We thought of Ant because I’ve met Ant a while ago. I didn’t know him well, but I was aware of the music he was doing, it was very rhythmical, it contained the same information in some of pieces we were working on. The three of them followed-up that day and they started rehearsing, practicing extensively, constantly structuring and de-structuring their music. A mixture of classically-influenced-meets-jazz -no wonder Harrold, who’s the main composer of the material, studied composition at London’s Royal Academy of Music and then at Yale School of Music in US. Putting all their influences in a bucket, they range from an extreme to another: from classical composer Elliott Carter to the influencing Swedish death metal band Meshuggah, from Armenian pianist Tigran Hamasyan to senior jazz icon Steve Coleman. And finally those influences are kind of secondary, in comparison to rhythmic exploration for itself. Says Richard Kassone thing that unites us is that we are all influenced in rhythm. It’s all music which is very involved in rhythm all being a slightly different context. We are very interested in contemporary classical music, jazz, lots of other music, folk music from certain parts of the world. Everything which is very heavy on rhythmic language. We are very passionate about.

None of the pieces in Standard Time can be considered a replication of a standard. Still each is borrowing something from a jazz standard or a popular jazz lick. Starting from first track Smalls, it is quite impossible to unravel the thread the band indicates between it and Blue in Green. The evocative descending line that Bill Evans painted at opening for Miles Davis‘s barely delicate trumpet is almost echoed by Harrold‘s descending piano main theme. But listening to intricate mute cymbal riff on the opening, is not quite as Jimmy Cobb would have played it. Steve Lehman adds reverbered echoes played in a fortissimo and brings the track in the area of a sort of tribal flavor, while Ant Law puts the things immediately in a certain direction adding a distorted single note Meshuggah-like polyrhythmic pattern on the lower register. When approaching first solo, still the rhythmic pattern remains ambiguous and impossible to interpret. Piano solo enters in balancing jazz and classically influences with melodicity and clever rhythmic patterns: but the it is quite impossible to keep attention away from the interaction between the dynamic melodies expressed by piano and the crazy meters played by the rhythmic side, as Ant Law plays the lower strings of the 8-stringed guitar almost like a bass would.

Steve Lehman, who guests second solo, is really not a new for such intricate environments. He feels well at his ease like he did in his Demian as Posthuman or latest Selebeyone, or when playing aside Vijay Iyer in his most recent and celebrated sextet. Richard Harrold says about Steve LehmanI found very interesting to collaborate with people who have very unique voice and very unique approach. Steve for me is definitely one of those people. I almost thought he really not being as a sax player, even though he is of course a sax player. He doesn’t really play like a sax player in a conventional way. He’s got a very distinctive tone, he’s got a very distinctive language, harmonically, melodically if you want to call it melodically I wouldn’t say ideally melodic in the way he approaches music in general just in term of his rhythmic approach and harmonic approach. Also Ant Law acknowledges the importance of adding a musician such as him: who are the players who are working with this deep rhythmic music? probably 9 or 10 living people. Steve Lehman, David Binney, maybe Chris Potter, maybe Mark Shim, maybe Greg Osby, Steve Coleman of course. But Steve Lehman is the only one who’s interested in contemporary classical music. Adding groove, slowing down patterns, playing with subtle delicacy or tenderness out of the impressive machinery of the underlying codes, he seems always to reveal hidden rhythms in the rhythms themselves.

In the middle part of track Law and Harrold bring back the descending cadence of the main theme and put it in a sort of out of phase question and answer between them, a chaotic spiral free fall. The ending coda is even more ferocious with quiet and loud moments driven by the heavy-distorted guitar. It might sound like what Richard Harrold is doing is out of time -says Ant Law, but sometimes the rhythm structural cycle is so complex, that it actually sounds you can’t hear what’s going on. But usually there is some underlying pulse there. That’s one of the reasons it takes so long to learn because most of music is in 4 or 3. But here we have the solo section in the piece Smalls, where does it go… 3 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 and then something like that again. The whole thing is like maybe a 111 beats long before it repeats! So if your ear is searching for it, it sounds random. Of course it is not random, we are all playing very precisely together. That’s one of the effects I think it is important to hear. Sometimes it seems to be chaotic or very abstract but yeah we are playing together.

Trio HLK / Shoreditch / Shot by Rob Blackham / www.blackhamimages.com

Reworking and devouring their pieces until a final disruption, this is the practice of this trio, often blurring the lines between what’s written and what’s improvised. I want there to be a pattern that is recognizable that is then distorted or disrupted a lot of the time -explains Harrold. Not the case in all pieces, just thinking in a general sort of sense. For me generally when I am listening to music that I really like, I like to be in a song that I can follow, a song that I can latch onto it, but also a song that gives me surprises and stays interesting. If things get a bit too repetitive, a bit too predictable, then I lose interestInterestingly they started their disrupting practice from Blue in Green, which was already ahead of its time. Ted Gioia writes about this track: the casual listener could be forgiven for thinking that the work is just a free-form improvisation, without clear beginning or end [Ted Gioia, The Jazz Standards]. Their practice of disrupting the music goes often in direction of exploring the listener’s perception work. There aren’t a lot of polyrhythmic music will often set up two or three rhythmic patterns and just let them play out and finally allow them to synch and then go out of synch -says Harrold. A lot of time when I am working with those things I like to disrupt them once they become unpredictable. That’s really my own perception whether that’s predictable or not, but maybe set two things in opposition for a short while and then play with them a little bit so they are no longer predictable and allow them to become predictable again. That process is often quite intuitive. That’s just my own playing through things a lot. Tapping through them, taking things out, putting things back in until I reach a point where I am happy with how predictable is versus how unpredictable is. It’s quite normal, quite an organic process of numeric patterns that work together and then there’s an human element of disruption that goes in there as well.

There are probably some other people out there technically accomplished that can do that, but they might not have such a vision of what they want to do when they are giving this music what they can bring to says Richard Kass about the guesting musicians in Standard TimeDame Evelyn Glennie has become a steady partner with the trio after the recording, siding them even in a the extensive UK tour they had after the release date. Being a percussion icon in the classical and avantgarde work, her partnership did not add just visibility to the trio effort, but impressed a landmark on the tracks. As Richard Harrold regarding her: she’s done so many really really improvisational projects, but she is just for me completely different approach. She doesn’t come from that kind of strict rhythmic improvisatory background, but she has this incredible palette, this incredible orchestral sense. And the interaction is even increasing during the tour, as the tracks, so intricate and heavily composed, show how flexible they can ben in terms of live rendition. Ant Law indicates that the effort by the vibraphonist guest shows how the band is still in the learning curve: it’s funny that we are playing more live gigs with Eveyln Glennie, she starts to do more and more crazy things that she didn’t do on the album. I feel excited, I kind of wish we could go back and record. But I am excited we can do now that we know what we can do. Now that we know what she can do, she knows what is welcome, she becomes more bold with each gig. 

Starting with an improvisation around what will be the opening chord of second track Extra Sensory Perception, piano and vibraphone create a dreamy and shiny environment. They are playing mainly with chord extensions, adding slowly an increased speed with upward scales. When we reach the opening section, a descending cadence enters in: again a Miles Davis track is referenced here, this time the Wayne Shorter composed E.S.P. While the original was a masterpiece of fluid movement, of smoother transitions that mimick a sort of city traffic, the three here borrow only with the initial bars of the theme and stretch/enlarge it at their own will during the whole piece. Glennie‘s solo progressively accelerates: she is playing around overlapping rhythms, seemingly following an hidden mathematical proportion between each of them, like she’s moving through a secret Fibonacci-sequence ladder. Next is the angular and dissected solo by Ant Law, who places himself in a delicate balance between a crazy shredder attitude and a warm soothing jazz tone. Again the initial theme is brought in while the trio + one moves up and down the accelerating throttle, playing with listener’s expectations through an ever changing riddle, as the score shows here. Richard Kass‘s role is not merely being the driver of the rhythm, while more regarded as solo player with special duties: often I am trying to look at what information is already present in the composition and work out either. As Ant would say how to unify some of the rhythms that have been composed. Sometimes I am trying mark out the meters and then play around or on on top of them or across of them. What I find most useful is to cause tension and release by playing across the bar or across the meter and then resolving it at somewhere. So sometimes when it happens, you have this as Richard Harrold called it, two things fighting, two patterns going on at the same time and some point they come back around. For me the effect of that is a tension and  then a release. And for some listeners perception of what one of these is the time and which one is the other rhythm that I kind of play along.

I take things out, put things back in until I reach a point where I am happy with how predictable is versus how unpredictable is.

Being based in a city like Edinburgh played a key role in the development of their sound. An ideal environment for cross-pollination as well as for allowing things slowly grow through practice, like Law mentions: It can be more difficult in London or somewhere in New York, because people are so frantically busy just running around. While London is the center of the new celebrated British jazz, the three seem to move sideways and to take time to let things ferment. So Jazz Bar, Edinburgh’s main venue for jazz music, acted like an hub and magnet for local jazz artistis. Ant Law is probably the one of three who gained most exposure so far. With two albums at his own name and a third to be released in November 2018 for Edition Records, he has already garnered the attention of many British musicians. The longtime collaboration with saxophonist Tim Garland was also a showcase of his abilities, including the participation on acclaimed 2016 effort One. This time he retains his usual mathematical approach to rhythm and incorporates the drier and wicked sound of his Schecter customized 8-strings guitar: when I was young I was looking at how many strings can you have on a guitar? 6-7-8 strings!? and then [when entering Trio HLK] I finally thought ‘The band doesn’t have bass, I am buying it!’ So I bought the 8-strings and I thought ‘Oh god!’. Still today we are practicing and I find it very difficult, sometimes I get lost in the extra strings I confuse. It is so unusual to see this instrument in a jazz line-up, more familiar in djent bands such as Animals as Leaders; but in a moment that metal is gaining more and more attention among jazz players –Jamie Saft & Bobby Previte‘s Doom Jazz, Dan Weiss‘s Starebaby, Tigra Hamasyan‘s Mockroot or Matt Mitchell‘s A Pouting Grimace to name few- this should not be a surprise.

A long solo intro by Steve Lehman breaks the frantic mood, but still prepares for another rhythmic battle in the approaching painS. The track starts with the dialogue between two swinged chords and an intricated proggy riff until they land to the main theme: the opening descending chord of Chick Corea‘s Spain is here the only fathomable element that hints at the jazz standard, as we move forward in the intricate interpolation of rhythms and counterpoint. Piano adds more bass and often duplicates guitar’s fatty lines -to mention that Harrold is using a Moog in live context- while Lehman explores creepy and angry melodies. Each section of the piece is a study in rhythmology for itself: exploring juxtapositions, shiftings, secret relationships until the thread that unites it all is barely visible. Dux is opened by a distorted cuban-like rhythm by Richard Kass -like a son drum kit played by Don Caballero– that piano echoes with the movement in parallel octaves typical in the music from the American island. Richard Harrold‘s solo is linked by an invisible thread with the rest of the band, making it impossible to understand where writing ends and improvisation begins. If you take a seat at one of our shows, there will be a percentage of 60% written 40% improvised, says Richard Kass, while Richard Harrold adds: Some of the sections, that the one you got there, have a kind of rhythmic structure that one actually has even chord symbols, so that’s more of a kind of a traditional jazz approach to improvisation. Some of the other forms are similar but with more complicated rhythms. we have for instance a 12 bar structure that has changing meters but with specific harmonic chord changes. It is hard to discern whether this is an improvised section. Some of the other pieces have sections that are for example a full bar rhythmic clue, there’s open free improvisation where this kind of rhythmic pattern is independent

They are working to produce new music for second album and in bringing new standards re-alive. Be prepared for Charlie Parker‘s Anthropology: it will be“Anthropometricks” and it will be on our next album. It is a monster – 10 pages of music with two solos! Following a clear vision, applying a different approach, working at a slower pace and cross-pollinating their influences seem to be the ground rules at the basis of Trio HLK. While their music is a parade of mathematical thinking and disrupting practices, still it is full of beauty, instinct, improvisation and immediacy, for how strange it might sound. This is the secret behind a band that is hopefully just at the starting point of their learning curve.

Trio HLK
Standard Time

1.Smalls (feat. Steve Lehman) 10:36
2.Extra Sensory Perception part i (feat. Evelyn Glennie) 03:50
3.Extra Sensory Perception part ii (feat. Evelyn Glennie) 06:51
4.painS part i (feat. Steve Lehman) 01:50
5.painS part ii (feat. Steve Lehman) 08:23
6.Twilt 08:37
7.Dux 08:24
8.Chewy 04:35
9.Stabvest 05:11
10.The Jig (feat. Evelyn Glennie) 08:13

Steve Lehman- Alto Sax
Evelyn Glennie- Vibraphone and Marimba
Rich Harrold- Piano
Ant Law- 8-string Guitar and effects
Richard Kass- Drums and percussion

http://www.triohlk.com

Versione in italiano

Due personalità di spicco della critica musicale come Alex Ross Nate Chinen hanno pubblicato, quasi contemporaneamente, due storie che sono collegate da un filo rosso: il primo parte dal rapper Kendrick Lamar che ha ricevuto il premio Pulitzer, tradizionalmente riservato ai compositori classici, per discutere lo stato della musica classica contemporanea; il secondo contestualizza un aneddoto del 2009, la polemica innescata da Kurt Rosenwinkel nei confronti di Vijay Iyer, che era stato insignito di un prestigioso premio alla MacArthur. Apparentemente legati solo dal tema della rissa tra personalità musicali, i due articoli invece riflettono e discutono ad un livello più profondo il rapporto tra tradizione e qualsiasi cosiddetta avanguardia nella musica. Entrambi mi sono rivenuti in mente quando ho incontrato alcuni giorni dopo i musicist del Trio HLK, che ha appena sfornato il debutto Standard Time. Un disco dove gli standards non vengono propriamente reinterpretati come farebbe un trio swing al primo disco, ma decisamente in una maniera più moderna. Come dice Ant Law, un terzo del trio alle chitarre, riferendosi ai musicisti della vecchia scuola, il titolo dovrebbe essere un po’ ‘provocatorio, come dire’ Dai, amico ‘. Questo non è uno standard! ora lo devi suonare così!

Ora, che un musicista della vecchia guardia possa avere il coraggio di suonare gli standards in questa maniera, o che decida di farsi accompagnare dal trio di Edimburgo, sembra improbabile. Anche considerando il fatto che i tre sembrano suonare tutto, fuorché jazz. Mettiamo insieme un uso intensivo di poliritmie all’interno di un contesto sia jazz che classico, un panorama fatto di linee complesse ed interconnesse, guidato dal batterista Richard Kass, dal pianista Richard Harrold e dal chitarrista Ant Law. I tre portano alla luce una potente miscela fatta di sottile delicatezza insieme ad una forza che si sprigiona in maniera dirompente dalle viscere. Una sorta di djent jazz, magari etichettabile come musica poliritmica contemporanea, o forse come math rock bop. Tutto in Standard Time parla del ritmo. È la cosa più primitiva. Qualsiasi tipo di esperienza umana, dalla prima sensazione del battito cardiaco della madre quando si è nel grembo materno, è la poliritmia dei due battiti del cuore dice Ant Law. Tuttavia questo elemento è solo un punto di partenza. Non si concentrano sul ritmo come mezzo di per se. Piuttosto come una direzione verso il vero nucleo vero e proprio della loro ricerca, che è la percezione del ritmo dell’ascoltatore. A livello compositivo molti dei pezzi giocano con la percezione del tempo, con la percezione del ritmo. Molte cose sono come allungate. In maniera convenzionale potrebbero suonare distorte allo scopo di allungare il ritmo e di comprimere il ritmo, di giocare con la percezione del tempo, dice Richard Harrold.

Il titolo Standard Time dovrebbe essere un po’ ‘provocatorio, come dire’ Dai, amico ‘. Questo non è uno standard! ora lo devi suonare così!

Il Trio HLK nasce quando Richard Kass e Richard Harrold si  incontrano ad Edimburgo e iniziamo a sviluppare un terreno comune allo scopo di esplorare le poliritmie. Vogliono lavorare come trio, e cercano di aggiungere un terzo membro non convenzionale alla loro line-up. Quindi incontrano il chitarrista Ant Law nel 2015, la sera di capodanno e decidono di suonare insieme. Se fare una lista di buone intenzioni per il prossimo anno al primo dell’anno non é mai la base per qualcosa di concreto – mettersi a dieta?, questo è evidentemente l’eccezione che conferma la regola. Richard Kass ricorda come é avvenuto il passaggio da duo a trio: avevamo appena iniziato a suonare insieme e Richard Harrold aveva dei pezzi che aveva scritto e mi piacevano. C’erano alcune cose con cui avrei iniziato a sperimentare, alcune idee micro ritmiche che erano un po’ allineate con le cose che mi interessavano e che mi piacevano davvero. Abbiamo suonato per un certo periodo come trio, ma non ritenevo che i membri che si avvicendavano fossero la soluzione ideale. Abbiamo pensato ad Ant perché l’avevo incontrato poco prima. Non lo conoscevo bene, ma ero a conoscenza della musica che stava facendo, che era molto ritmata e che conteneva le stesse linee di alcuni dei pezzi su cui stavamo lavorando. I tre danno seguito ai propositi del primo dell’anno ed inizano a provare, a esercitarsi a lungo, a strutturare e destrutturare costantemente la loro musica. Una miscela di influenze a caval\o tra classica e jazz – Harrold, che è il principale compositore del materiale, abbia studiato composizione alla Royal Academy of Music di Londra e poi alla Yale School of Music negli Stati Uniti. Mettendo insieme tutte le loro influenze, andremmo da un estremo all’altro: dal compositore classico Elliott Carter al gruppo death metal svedese Meshuggah, dal pianista armeno Tigran Hamasyan al maestro del poliritmie nel jazz  Steve Coleman. E infine quelle influenze stesse sono in un certo senso secondarie, in confronto all’esplorazione ritmica. Dice Richard Kass: una cosa che ci unisce è che siamo tutti influenzati dal ritmo. È tutta la musica che è molto caratterizzata dal ritmo, essendo tutti un contesto diverso l’uno dall’altro. Siamo molto interessati alla musica classica contemporanea, al jazz, a molta altra musica, alla musica etnica di alcune parti del mondo. Tutto ciò ha un peso forte su come viene trattato il ritmo. 

Nessuno dei pezzi di Standard Time può essere considerato una rilettura vera e propria di uno standard. Eppure ognuno prende qualcosa in prestito da uno standard jazz ben preciso o da una tema jazz. Partendo dalla prima traccia Smalls, è abbastanza difficile arrivare a scoprire il legame tra questo pezzo e Blue in Green. La suggestiva linea discendente che Bill Evans ha dipinto all’apertura della traccia di Kind of Blue per la tromba delicatamente accennata di Miles Davis quasi riecheggia nel tema discendente del pianoforte di Harrold. Ma ad ascoltare l’intricato riff sui piatti in muto dell’intro, non è esattamente come ascoltare Jimmy Cobb. Steve Lehman aggiunge echi riverberati, che vengono suonati in fortissimo, e porta nel pezzo una sorta di sapore tribale, mentre Ant Law mette le cose immediatamente in chiaro aggiungendo un pattern poliritmico e distorto, tipico dei Meshuggah, con una singola nota nel registro basso. Quando ci si avvicina al primo assolo, il pattern ritmico rimane ambiguo e impossibile da decifrare. Il solo di piano entra in una sorta di bilanciamento tra scale jazz e influenze classiche, suonato con melodicità ed intelligenza nella scelte ritmica delle frasi: ma è abbastanza impossibile tenere l’attenzione lontana dall’interazione tra la dinmicità del piano ed i metri da mal di testa della sezione ritmica, con Ant Law che suona le corde basse dell’chitarra ad 8 corde quasi come fosse un basso.

Steve Lehman, che ospita il secondo solo, non è nuovo a strutture così complesse. Si sente a suo agio in questi contesti come più volte ha fatto nella sua carriera, come ad esempio in Demian as Posthuman o nell’ultimo album a suo nome Selebeyone, o nel suonare accanto a Vijay Iyer nella sua  recente e celebrata formazione. Richard Harrold dice di Steve Lehman: ho trovato molto interessante a collaborare con persone che hanno una voce e un approccio davvero unico. Steve per me è sicuramente una di quelle persone. Ho quasi pensato che non fosse un sassofonista, anche se ovviamente è un sassofonista. In realtà non suona come un sassonista in modo convenzionale. Ha un tono molto particolare, ha un linguaggio molto particolare, armonicamente, melodicamente, se si può chiarmarlo melodico in realtà. E non direi che é proprio melodico nel modo in cui si avvicina alla musica, in generale, in termini di approccio ritmico e approccio armonico. Anche Ant Law riconosce l’importanza di aggiungere un musicista come lui: chi può andare a scavare in profondità in questa musica così ricca a livello ritmico? probabilmente 9 o 10 persone viventi, forse. Steve Lehman, forse David Binney, forse Chris Potter, forse Mark Shim, forse Greg Osby, Steve Coleman, naturalmente. Ma Steve Lehman è l’unico che si interessa anche alla musica classica contemporanea. Aggiungendo groove, rallentando i pattern, giocando con sottile delicatezza o sottigliezza all’esterno dell’imponente meccanismo delle strutture sottostanti, sembra sempre capace di rivelare ritmi nascosti all’interno dei ritmi stessi.

Nella parte centrale della traccia Law e Harrold riportano la cadenza discendente del tema principale e lo mettono in una sorta di botta e risposta fuori fase tra di loro, quasi una caduta libera a spirale. La coda finale è ancora più feroce con momenti tranquilli ed altri assordanti guidati dalla chitarra pesantemente distorta. Potrebbe sembrare che ciò che Richard Harrold sta facendo sia fuori dalla ritmica – dice Ant Law, ma a volte il ciclo strutturale del ritmo è così complesso, che sembra davvero che tu non possa sentire cosa sta succedendo. Eppure di solito c’è un impulso lì sotto. Questo è uno dei motivi per cui ci vuole così tanto tempo per impararla, perché la maggior parte della musica è in 4 o 3. Per esempio la sezione del solo in Smalls, dove si va in… 3 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 e poi qualcosa di simile. Credo che siano 111 battute prima che si ripeta la sezione! Quindi, se il tuo orecchio sta cercando di capirci qualcosa, ti sembra in realtà casuale. Ovviamente non è casuale, stiamo suonando tutti molto precisamente insieme. Questo è uno degli effetti che penso sia importante sentire. A volte sembra essere caotico o molto astratto ma sì, stiamo suonando insieme.

Trio HLK / Shoreditch / Shot by Rob Blackham / www.blackhamimages.com

Rielaborare e divorare i loro pezzi fino ad una distruzione finale, questa è ciò che il trio fa, spesso confondendo i piani tra ciò che è scritto e ciò che è improvvisato. Voglio che ci sia uno schema riconoscibile che viene poi distorto o distrutto per un certo tempo – spiega Harrold. Non avviene in tutti i pezzi, solo come regola di fondo. Per me, in generale, quando ascolto musica che mi piace, voglio entrare in un pezzo che posso seguire, un pezzo al quale mi posso attaccare, ma anche un pezzo che mi dà sorprese e rimane interessante. Se le cose diventano un po troppo ripetitive, un po’ troppo prevedibili, allora perdo interesse. È interessante notare che hanno iniziato la loro pratica distruttiva da uno statndard come Blue in Green che già conteneva forti segni di cambiamento rispetto al passato. Tanto che Ted Gioia ne ha scritto in questa maniera: l’ascoltatore occasionale potrebbe essere perdonato nel pensare che il lavoro sia solo un’improvvisazione in forma libera, senza un chiaro inizio o fine [Ted Gioia, The Jazz Standards]. La loro pratica di dsitruggere la musica cerca spesso di esplorare il lavoro di percezione dell’ascoltatore. Non c’è  molta musica poliritmica che spesso stabilisce due pattern ritmici o tre pattern e li lascia solo suonare e possono tornare a sincronizzarsi e quindi andare fuori sincrono – dice Harrold. Quando lavoro per un sacco di tempo con queste cose, mi piace disturbarle fino a farle diventate imprevedibili. Dipende dal modo in cui lo percepisco, che sia prevedibile o meno. Ma metti due cose in opposizione per un breve periodo e poi giochi un po’ con loro, in modo che non siano più prevedibili e permetti loro di diventare nuovamente prevedibili. Questo avviene spesso in maniera abbastanza intuitiva. E’ solo il mio modo di suonare. Entrarci dentro, estrapolarle, rimettere le cose in una maniera precisa, fino a raggiungere un punto in cui sono contento di quanto sia prevedibili rispetto a quanto siano imprevedibili. È abbastanza normale, é un processo organico fatto di schemi numerici che funzionano insieme, ma c’è anche un elemento umano di distruzione che entra in gioco.

Probabilmente ci sono altri musicisti che tecnicamente potrebbero riuscire a farlo, ma non avrebbero la visione di quello che vogliono fare quando suonano questa musica e di quello che possono portare in dote dice Richard Kass a proposito degli ospiti in Standard Time. Evelyn Glennie è diventata una partner stabile del trio dopo le sessioni di registrazione, aggiungendosi anche durante l’ampio tour del Regno Unito. Da icona del percussione nel mondo classico e d’avanguardia, la sua collaborazione non ha aggiunto solo visibilità al lavoro, ma ha lasciato un segno preciso sulle traccie. Come Richard Harrold dice a suo riguardo: ha fatto parte di davvero tanti progetti di improvvisazione, ma per me ha un approccio completamente diverso. Non viene da quel tipo di rigoroso background ritmico di improvvisazione. Ha questa incredibile tavolozza, questo incredibile senso orchestrale. E l’interazione é andata crescendo durante il tour, tanto che le tracce, così complesse e apparentemente solidamente composte, mostrano quanto possano essere flessibili in contesto live. Ant Law dice che l’appporto della vibrafonista mostra come la band sia ancora nella curva di apprendimento: è divertente ora che stiamo suonando più live con Eveyln Glennie e lei inizia a fare cose sempre più pazze che non ha fatto su l’album. Sono emozionato, vorrei poter tornare e registrare di nuovo. Ma sono eccitato di ciò che possiamo fare ora che sappiamo cosa possiamo fare. Ora che sappiamo cosa può fare lei, che sa fin dove si può spingere, diventa sempre più audace ad ogni concerto.

A partire da un’improvvisazione attorno a quello che sarà l’accordo di apertura della seconda traccia Extra Sensory Perception, il pianoforte e il vibrafono creano un ambiente sognante e brillante. Suonano principalmente sulle estensioni degli accordi, aggiungendo lentamente una maggiore velocità attraverso scale ascendenti. Quando raggiungiamo la sezione di apertura, entra una cadenza discendente: di nuovo qui si fa riferimento a una traccia di Miles Davis, questa volta composta da Wayne Shorter, ovvero E.S.P. Mentre l’originale era un capolavoro di movimento fluido, di transizioni più melliflue che imitano una sorta di traffico cittadino, i tre qui prendono in prestito solo le battute iniziali del tema e lo allungano / ingrandiscono a loro piacimento durante l’intero pezzo. L’assolo di Glennie accelera progressivamente: suona a cavallo di ritmi sovrapposti, apparentemente seguendo una proporzione matematica nascosta tra ognuno di essi, come se si stesse muovendo attraverso una scala segreta della sequenza di Fibonacci. Segue l’assolo angoloso e dissezionato di Ant Law, che si posiziona in equilibrio tra un sound forsennato da shredder e un tono caldo da smooth jazz. Ancora una volta il tema iniziale viene introdotto mentre il trio + uno si muove su e giù accelerando sul gas, giocando con le aspettative dell’ascoltatore come un enigma sonoro in continua evoluzione. Il ruolo di Richard Kass non è solo essere di principale motore del ritmo, ma ad un certo punto più di solista con compiti speciali: spesso cerco di vedere quali informazioni sono già presenti nella composizione e adattarmi di conseguenza. Come direbbe Ant allo scopo di unificare alcuni dei ritmi che sono stati composti. A volte provo a seguire la linea metrica e poi a giocare sopra o attraverso o insieme ai ritmi. Quello che trovo utile è di imprimere tensione e rilascio giocando attraverso la battuta o attraverso lo strumento e poi risolvere da qualche parte. Così, a volte, quando succede, hai due oggetti contrapposti, due schemi che sono in corso nello stesso tempo e un punto in cui tornano indietro. Per me l’effetto è prima di tensione e poi di liberazione. E per alcuni ascoltatori la percezione di qual’é il tempo e qual’è il ritmo é differente, é con questo che mi piace giocare.

Prendo qualcosa, la giro e la rigiro fino a che non raggiungo un punto nel quale sono felice con la maniera in cui prevedibile ed imprevedibile dialogano.

Essere basati in una città come Edimburgo ha avuto un ruolo chiave nello sviluppo del loro suono. Un ambiente ideale per le influenze incrociate e per permettere che il sound crescesse lentamente attraverso le prove, come dice Law: non penso sia possibile da qualche parte a Londra o da qualche parte a New York, perché le persone sono così freneticamente impegnate a correre intorno a tutto senza risparmiare tempo per nient’altro. Mentre Londra è il centro del nuovo celebre jazz britannico, i tre sembrano muoversi lateralmente e prendere tempo per lasciare che le cose fermentino altrove. Il Jazz Bar, il principale attrattore del jazz ad Edimburgo, ha funzionato come posto di ritrovo e calamita per artisti locali. Ant Law è probabilmente quello dei tre che ha ottenuto maggior esposizione finora. Con due album a suo nome e un terzo da pubblicare nel novembre 2018 per Edition Records, ha già attirato l’attenzione di molti musicisti britannici. La collaborazione con il sassofonista Tim Garland è stata una dimostrazione delle sue capacità, inclusa la partecipazione all’album del 2016 One che ha ricevuto molta attenzione. Questa volta mantiene il suo abituale approccio matematico al ritmo e incorpora il suono più secco e cattivo della sua chitarra a 8 corde Schecter customizzata: quando ero giovane osservavo quante corde si poteva avere su una chitarra? 6-7-8 corde!? e poi [quando sono entrato nel Trio HLK] alla fine ho pensato ‘La band non ha il basso, la compro!’ Così ho comprato la 8 corde e ho pensato ‘Oh dio!’. Ancora oggi ci stiamo esercitando e la trovo molto difficile, a volte mi perdo nelle corde aggiuntive, mi confondono. È così inusuale vedere questo strumento in una formazione jazzistica, più familiare in gruppi di djent come Animals as Leaders; ma in un momento in cui il metal sta guadagnando sempre più attenzione tra i jazzisti – Jamie Saft e Bobby Previte con Doom Jazz, Starebaby di Dan Weiss, Mockroot di Tigran Hamasyan, A Pouting Grimace di Matt Mitchell per nominarne solo alcuni – non dovrebbe essere una sorpresa.

Una lunga intro di Steve Lehman rompe la sensazione di frenesia, ma prepara anche per un’altra battaglia ritmica in arrivo. La traccia inizia con il dialogo tra due accordi che oscillano fra di loro e un intricato riff quasi prog fino a che non si arriva al tema principale: l’accordo discendente di apertura di Spain di Chick Corea è l’unico elemento che suggerisce l’usuale standard jazz di riferimento, mentre si va avanti in una intricata interpolazione di ritmi e contrappunti. Il piano aggiunge i bassi e spesso duplica le linee corpulente della chitarra -da dire che Harrold usa un Moog nel contesto live-, mentre Lehman esplora melodie inquietanti e rabbiose. Ogni sezione del pezzo è uno studio di ritmologia di per sé: esplorano giustapposizioni, spostamenti, relazioni segrete fino a quando il filo che unisce tutto rimane appena visibile. Dux è aperta da un ritmo distorto ad opera Richard Kass che richiama un pattern cubano  – una specie di son interpretato dai Don Caballero – che il pianoforte riecheggia con il movimento in ottave parallele tipico della musica dell’isola americana. L’assolo di Richard Harrold è collegato da un filo invisibile con il resto della band, rendendo impossibile capire dove finisce la scrittura e inizia l’improvvisazione. Nei nostri live c’é una percentuale del 60% scritta e per il 40% improvvisata, dice Richard Kass, mentre Richard Harrold aggiunge: alcune sezioni hanno una sorta di struttura ritmica che in realtà ha anche degli accordi, è più una sorta di approccio tradizionale del jazz all’improvvisazione. Alcune delle altre sezioni sono simili, ma con ritmi più complicati. Abbiamo ad esempio una struttura a 12 battute con metriche che variano in concomitanza con gli accordi. È difficile capire se una sezione é improvvisata o meno. Alcuni dei pezzi hanno sezioni con una battuta intera su una ritmica precisa, c’è, invece, improvvisazione libera nelle sezioni che sono indipendenti da questi pattern ritmici.

Ora il Trio HLK sta lavorando a nuovi pezzi e nuovi standard da reinterpretare per il secondo album. E’ già pronta Anthropology di Charlie Parker: sarà “Anthropometricks” e sarà sul nostro prossimo album. È un mostro: 10 pagine di musica con due assoli! Seguire una visione chiara, un approccio diverso, lavorare a ritmo più lento e farsi influenzare trasversalmente da più parti, sembrano queste le regole fondamentali alla base del loro modo di suonare. Mentre la loro musica è un manifesto del pensiero matematico e delle pratiche di distruzione e ricostruzione musicale, nonostante tutto è piena di bellezza, istinto, improvvisazione e immediatezza, per quanto strano possa sembrare. Questo è il segreto dietro una band sembra appena aver iniziato ad esplorare il suo potenziale.

Trio HLK
Standard Time

1.Smalls (feat. Steve Lehman) 10:36
2.Extra Sensory Perception part i (feat. Evelyn Glennie) 03:50
3.Extra Sensory Perception part ii (feat. Evelyn Glennie) 06:51
4.painS part i (feat. Steve Lehman) 01:50
5.painS part ii (feat. Steve Lehman) 08:23
6.Twilt 08:37
7.Dux 08:24
8.Chewy 04:35
9.Stabvest 05:11
10.The Jig (feat. Evelyn Glennie) 08:13

Steve Lehman- Alto Sax
Evelyn Glennie- Vibraphone and Marimba
Rich Harrold- Piano
Ant Law- 8-string Guitar and effects
Richard Kass- Drums and percussion

http://www.triohlk.com

Troot – Constance and the Waiting [2018] pt.2

Interviews with Troot members from April to August 2018

First part
Italian version below

Like every note could bring a secret mark of how it was played, the story behind Troot‘s Constance and the Waiting is first and foremost the story of the players who made it happen. Through the shortest time this team of ten musicians, each with such a different background from each other, managed to arrange and play a complex piece of music that sits in an area between progressive, chamber and avant-garde. And the sense of fulfillment for making it happen subtly springs as the listener plays it.

Pressure and urgency were key elements in the band set-up, but apparently also the secret for the success of the project. With a certain dose of humour Alex Anthony Faide indicates the key element was being short-noticed last minute. It was my case: I knew of the project would have begun three days before that I was ultimately be there. That left really few time for preparation. It added extra tabasco!… and he’s immediately replied by Bill Horist: that’s a great example of Alex and I we have a different style, because I had to prepare a lot! Choosing first the members to fit the right approach instead of focusing on those instruments to include in the album is reiterated like a karma by the producers. Tim Root again: We really wanted Steve to be able to focus on producing, facilitating and doing working his magic. So it was his idea to bring in Alex. When I originally listed  the players for this album I wanted Steve and Bill, because I thought their pairing would have been really interesting and fruitful. Steve brought in Alex to sort of take on that role, because Alex focuses strictly on the music letting up Steve to focus on other stuff. Now we got these two guitars, the main guitars on the album: Bill bringing the free improvisation ‘Fred Frith’ prepared guitar crazy type and Alex bringing the immaculate perfect playing disciplined side of life, the ‘Robert Fripp’ side of life. I wanted that tension between those two players. My job then became -and this is really my job on the whole album- making it possible for their unique magic to bubble up. What’s not making Bill do things Bill that can do, not making Alex do things Alex can do, but letting up them be themselves and those two guitars colliding in really interesting ways. And again about choosing the balance between acoustic and electric instruments: adding that organic/moving-the-air in an acoustic way, having acoustic instruments was incredibly important, it’s not I said I really wanted clarinet or I really wanted sax or I really wanted violin, I wanted the right people. I wanted great musicians with great ears who are open for this kind of difficult projects, to show up and do their things. Amy is another great example too: she can play all the stuff, clarinet -although she does not play clarinet on the album- and alto sax. After a day of rehearsal she said ‘I’m gonna get my accordion’. She actually came back with two, we listened to them both and one was a better match for the album. She started playing accordion here and there. None would think of putting accordion on Axe from the Frozen Sea Within, but it’s there and it is perfect. That is because of the player, not for the instrument.

Putting musicians out of their comfort zone, but also allowing them to produce creatively in the arrangement phase. Tim RootThat was challenge of making the music in four days, sitting down as a group of ten people and figuring out ‘how do we take 40 minutes of piano music and turn it into 40 minutes of an ensemble’. By parsing up these parts, adding things, layering stuff. I didn’t send Nora a page of music and said ‘just play few bars’. I had Nora on the piano score, and said ‘please play what you think is appropriate to go with this’. That was the challenge, that’s where being great improvisers made this possible. Having these fantastic players, these fantastic ears. Approximately 70%/80% of the album was recorded during the days, with very few overdubs afterward. And improvisation was a key ingredient to allow players a deeper role in the arrangement phase, to let them decide where to put themselves in a sort of cooperative manner. Amy Denio says: We were given all a copy of the music that Tim was playing, so the music we would have worked with to look at if we wanted to read it. I tried to learn all the parts of all his 10 fingers and for me to decide which part I was actually able to play or somebody is coming with things I thought it would make counter rhythm or whatever polyrhythm. All of us we had the basic tools for our ears and these pieces of paper -many, many pieces of paper- we used our intuition toward our very best abilities trying to decide this mass of information and bring each of our individuals. As it began to take shape I think we all heard really how things were being arranged almost like none was hearing an arrangement.

steve_proj_3_006_med res

Steve Ball‘s previous experiences with ‘open ensembles’ like Tiny Orchestral Moments played a pivotal role. The album booklet features a list of practices that guided the sessions, explicitly mentioning they came from Steve’s ensemble. Starting from ‘Begin with Silence‘ and then ending with ‘Cleese Release‘ they can be confused with the term ‘rules’ from a how-to-apply-a-golden-rule mindset like mine. Instead they are not meant to set a direction, or even to prepare the musician for the rehearsal, but even more to focus on the event from an experiential afterward look. When I asked Steve Ball whether those were rules that set the path, sort of ground rules before the event, he took a long breath like he was summoning all the patience he never thought he could have and with a relentless spirit corrected me with this articulated and insightful answer: Most of those ideas are there for reflection after the fact. They aren’t necessarily useful as instructions or as some kind of recipe or formula. For me after years of playing in large ensembles where ego just destroys not only the process of what’s unfolding, but also the lives and the relationships of the people who were collaborating, I’ve developed over the years a set of principles and practices that, at the right moment, at the right observation, [can do] what might be necessary to change the energy from dispersed and crazy and provide funny stories to let’s hopefully these unison lines play together. To drop best of the energy that might in the room from the humour and the love and the fear that’s happening, but to turn it to transformative, into something that’s needed to focus and transform this energy into something that becomes part of what’s captured into music. Seeing all those 10 commitments, these words and theories outside of the actual experiences you share together can be very noisy and misleading and a waste of time. But, if you are at the end of the process or at the end of the day and you’re tired and you do not feel like like you can do anything else, you will remember that one of your favorite comedians [John Cleese] had a principle for how he applied work at the end of long day. He used to go an extra hour, even when he was done or everyone else left and he was dying. So as a group, if you are at the end of your rope, but you trust each other and you decide to let go of your exhaustion and let go what you want for yourself and put some extra effort, those can be moments that are unpredictable, unplannable and moments of incredible focus. You decide together to go beyond what you might normally do, if you are just in your automatic daily sleeping mode. That’s an example of a practice that sounds corny to say, but I call that ‘Cleese release’ and it is just a little reminder that when you are done and you are tired you don’t have to stop, you don’t have to give to your bodies impulse to just let it be good enough. Sometimes it can make the difference between album art that doesn’t have typos, which every album including this one has typos, than you think ‘Oh I am just I am done’ and you put a little of extra effort in. Something magical might emerge, because you re-apply your energy to go deeper or to go further than you might just have trusted your exhaustion. Self reflection and meditation let the musician enter a deeper state of self awareness, that reflects on team dynamics themselves. Beth Flenoor explains in practice it with the reverence and the importance of silence in this process of starting from silence and returning to silence. All of those frequency builds up and becomes more and more chaotic, it gets released and then you can take a breath and really listen to entirety of the environment and the people and the egos and the intentions and then start again. It didn’t just happen at the beginning or at the end of the day, but it was part of the practice to keep reminding ourselves to keep returning to that to build that energy bank to actually give birth to this thing.

Tim Root is deeply influenced by working as theatre music composer. His music has a sort of visual type. Before Constance and the Waiting being released, I asked Marco Machera his opinion about this work and he turned this answer to me: when we played it all together, it sounded like a whole opera. Theatre and narrative are recurrent red threads here. My work of the theatre is also a big part of this Tim Root says. I scored plays, I conducted, I worked in musical theatres. I know how to pick a picture, how to tell a story musically. I think as a composer, as an arranger, I know there’s a longer arch in theatre emotionally, that I think to go for the music, to let the piece evolve over periods of  this kind and take you somewhere. Palasidai is a great example of that. A delicate major arpeggiated chord sways between the tonic, the major seconds and third and back before gently leaning against to a diminished 7th chord in Palasidai‘s intro. When we move to the verse, violin, clarinet and sax lead a chromatic melody through the chords, until the cadence brings to the elegiac, pastoral main theme played by saxophone, while the full band supports it with an ecstatic wall of sound. Flashes are going in front of our eyes, we are uplifted, flying through as an archaic melody and so many celebrated themes come back into our memory. Pink Floyd‘s Us and them maybe? -hear how the last note ends on the diminished chord. Or maybe classical movies soundtrack? -Italian movie fans might resonate with Piero Piccioni‘s Samba Fortuna, the main theme from Il Professor Guido Tersilli‘s soundtrack. That’s what great melodies made by great composers do.

Palasidai‘s first part ends with a variation on the chromatic theme, a chromatic mediance that moves from a major chord to another hints Tim Root, which proves again the craftiness of work in the arrangement of counterpoint made by the band. Movement to the second part is almost subtle: like when audience is already clapping when ending a great pitch of tension during a show, like moving off a cliff. But still the band is playing. Now the tension grows back again in, everything is growing, everything is dramatically increasing like a wave of the ocean. Ladies and gentlemen, let Beth Flenoor in! An impressive mixture of growls, echoes, sounds, undetectable utterances, a sort of esperanto of expressions that mixes syllables from English, French and whatever might trigger an emotion. Tim Root acknowledges it as a moment of magic: what Beth has there by the way is her own language. She and I haven’t talked a lot because Beth is magic. I’ve learnt just to let Beth do what Beth does. She is magic. That’s it, just say ‘go, please do the thing you do best’ and she’s got that. But if I were to guess, I would say to what Beth has developed is a set of performance instructions that allows her to improvise a language. I think it is amazing. Beth Flenoor tells more about how all of this came to surface: I initially sat down to work on this music as a clarinetist. As Tim played it for us live at the piano from memory from the depths of his heart and we were in this room where we all gathered for this time, I immediately heard those other parts which part of my practice is to never ignore that when it calls you, you answer the phone and let it come through. That entire section was not a pre-meditated or scripted or thought-out, it was a complete emotional response and integration to what it felt to me and what the music was asking for. I have consciously for the last 11 yrs been working with music-based out of my own language, it has been happening my entire life, but I have been very conscious of it as a composer. Using this language that is based on syllables to go directly at the heart of an emotional response, that is not tied to any definition of words. Those words, in whatever language they are spoken, they are like microscopes that look at much deeper sentiment. This syllabic language is about bypassing all of those centers and going directly to an emotional response and whatever it calls for you as a listener. That’s the language that I write my own music in. It’s the language that I use when I am moving around the world and speaking with people or experiences even when nobody else in the room does not know about it means, but that’s how I interface with exystence at large. For me it was just getting permissioned to open the facet and let this thing come through of what I thought like I was hearing asking me for.

steve_proj_3_052_medres.jpeg

We think of Weather Report‘s Birdland as the fast and thin line of descending chords in Venice of the Sky‘s intro sweeps in. Alessandro Inolti alternates powerful hits to more frequent breaks, making easier to compare with a mixture of Carl Palmer‘s percussive approach with the witty savagery of Mike Portnoy. Moving through the destructured solos by Bill Horist, then by Amy Denio, the track brings whimsical moments and then more propelling parts until the ending pristine solo by Nora Germain on violin. Tim praises her contribution in this way: Nora was Steve’s suggestion. He brought her in for several reasons. She can play every note of the album, she is an immaculate musician. She can play everything she gets. She is a very quick learner. She was familiar with Steve’s way of working with groups, the Tiny Orchestral Moments approach. The role of the violin in terms of arrangement we just let that evolve. We let her ears determine the place for her to use her violin, to accentuate melodies, to accentuate rhythmic stuff, the stuff that she does.

Only apparently de-structured, Hollow by Footsteps is a delicate and romantic 21st century romanza. Violin and clarinet dialogue intensely with the piano, move from reflectiveness to agitation multiple times, giving evidence to Tim‘s piano sound and to intimate recording engineering thanks to Jonathan Plum. Aggressiveness comes back in a sudden manner in ending’s track, Joey. Moving quirky through a throbbing beat in 9, this is the earliest composition by Tim Root  -it was composed back in 1984. Again an highly crafted counterpoint, a progressive orientation and a wide use of chromaticisms refer to avant-garde classical until heavy metal. Through frequent start and stops, we land on a peak of aggressiveness when the main themes are back in and the finale is the full band at his highest.

Analyzing where all Constance and the Waiting‘s influences come from might turn out to be an exercise of redundant and annoying meticulousness. I would rather agree with Tim‘s example that clarifies the futile value of labeling music sometimes: a couple of days after we recorded our music I was at an EchoTest show in Seattle and I was talking to Julie outside after their set. Someone walked up and asked Julie ‘what kind of music do you guys play? how do you call that music?’. It’s the hardest question for a musician to answer and I think her answer was wonderful: ‘Beautiful!’. So what’s the unifying glue that keeps this record in, that makes us feeling we are part of an opera and builds that invisible thread line through the 40 minutes? Julie Slick indicates a direction: you can tell that all of this is coming from the same composer because there’s definitively vision there. Whether the secret ingredient of Constance and the Waiting was a clear vision during composing process or a state-of-the-art team working, these 10 musicians were able to enter ‘the Zone’, go for the extra-hour and create an unpredictable and unprecedented effort. 

Troot
Constance and the Waiting
1. Axe for the Frozen Sea Within
2. Dance Elena
3. Palasidai
4. Venice of the Sky
5. Hollow by Footsteps
6. Joey

Steve Ball – acoustic guitar
Amy Denio – saxophone and accordion
Alex Anthony Faide – guitar
Beth Fleenor – clarinets and voice
Nora Germain – violin
Bill Horist – guitar and prepared guitar
Alessandro Inolti – drums
Marco Machera – bass
Tim Root – piano and keyboards
Julie Slick – bass

www.facebook.com/trootmusic/
http://trootmusic.com

First part
Italian version

Così come ogni nota porta un segno segreto di come è stata suonata, la trama di  Constance and the Waiting dei Troot è prima di tutto la storia dei musicisti che l’hanno suonato. Per un periodo di tempo limitato, questo gruppo di dieci musicisti, ognuno con uno background così diverso l’uno dall’altro, è riuscito ad arrangiare e suonare un lavoro complesso che si trova in un’area a cavallo tra progressive, musica da camera e avant-garde. E il senso di appagamento nell’esserci riusciti si sente in maniera sottile quando lo si ascolta.

La pressione e l’urgenza sono stati elementi chiave nell’organizzazione del gruppo, ma apparentemente anche il segreto stesso del successo del progetto. Con una certa dose di umorismo, Alex Anthony Faide indica che l’elemento chiave è stato essere avvertito veramente all’ultimo minuto. Così è successo a me: ho saputo che il progetto sarebbe iniziato tre giorni prima di quando poi mi sono trovato lì. C’é stato davvero poco tempo per la preparazione. E questo ha aggiunto ulteriore tabasco! … e a lui risponde immediatamente Bill Horist: questo è un ottimo esempio di come Alex e io abbiamo uno stile diverso, perché io, invece, mi sono dovuto preparare molto! Concentrarsi prima sui musicisti invece che su quali strumenti da includere e poi trovare i musicisti, questa è stata la direzione seguita come il karma dai produttori. Tim Root ancora: volevamo che Steve fosse in grado di concentrarsi sulla produzione, sulla facilitazione e su come creare la magia del gruppo. È stata una sua idea portare Alex. Quando all’inizio ho elencato i musicisti per questo album, volevo Steve e Bill, perché pensavo che il loro abbinamento sarebbe stato molto interessante e fruttuoso. Steve ha proposto ad Alex di assumere quel ruolo, perché Alex si concentrasse esclusivamente sulla musica, lasciando che Steve si concentrasse, invece, su altre cose. Ora abbiamo queste due chitarre, le chitarre principali dell’album: Bill che porta l’improvvisazione libera a la ‘Fred Frith, con la sua pazzia chitarristica, e Alex che porta il perfetto lato disciplinato della vita, il lato della vita a la ‘Robert Fripp’. Volevo quella tensione tra questi due musicisti. Il mio lavoro è poi diventato – e questo è davvero il mio lavoro nell’intero album – fare in modo che la loro magia unica potesse esplodere. Fare in modo che Bill non facesse le cose che abitualmente Bill può fare, fare in modo che Alex non facesse le cose che abitualmente Alex può fare, ma lasciare che siano loro due e le loro due chitarre a scontrarsi in modo davvero interessante. E ancora sull’equilibrio tra strumenti acustici ed elettrici: aggiungere quella specie di carattere  organico, quella cifra di strumenti che muovono l’aria, ovvero avere strumenti acustici era incredibilmente importante. Non é stato che volevo esattamente il clarinetto o che volevo esattamente il sax o che volevo esattamente violino, ma volevo le persone giuste. Volevo grandi musicisti con l’orecchio giusto, che fossero aperti a questo tipo di progetti difficili, che si presentassero e facessero le loro cose. Amy è un altro esempio perfetto: può suonare tutto, il clarinetto, anche se non suona il clarinetto nell’album, e il sax alto. Dopo un giorno di prove, ha detto “Prenderò la mia fisarmonica”. In realtà è tornata con due, le abbiamo ascoltate entrambe e una era un più adatta per l’album. Ha iniziato a suonare la fisarmonica qua e là. Nessuno penserebbe di mettere la fisarmonica su Axe from the Frozen Sea Within, ma c’é e ci sta perfettamente. Questo è dovuto al musicista, non allo strumento.

Mettere i musicisti fuori dalla loro comfort zone, ma anche permettere loro di aggiungere il loro apporto creativo nella fase di arrangiamento. Tim Root: Questa è stata la sfida nel creare la musica in quattro giorni, sedersi come un gruppo di dieci persone e capire “come facciamo con 40 minuti di musica per pianoforte a trasformarla in 40 minuti di un ensemble”. Analizzando queste parti, aggiungendo, stratificando. Non é che ho inviato a Nora una pagina di musica e ho detto “Suona solo poche battute”. Avevo la partitura per pianoforte e ho detto a Nora “per favore suona quello che pensi sia appropriato per questo”. Questa è stata la sfida, avere grandi improvvisatori ha reso possibile tutto ciò. Avere questi fantastici musicisti, con l’orecchio giusto. Circa il 70% / 80% dell’album è stato registrato durante le giornate, con pochissime sovraincisioni fatte in seguito. E l’improvvisazione é stata un ingrediente chiave per consentire ai musicisti un ruolo più profondo nella fase di arrangiamento, per consentire loro di decidere dove situarsi in maniera quasi autogestita. Amy Denio dice: Ci è stata data una copia della musica che Tim avrebbe suonato, quindi la musica con cui avremmo lavorato avremmo potuto eseguirla allo spartito. Ho cercato di imparare tutte le parti di tutte e dieci le sue dita per decidere quale parte ero in grado di suonare o decidere come situarmi rispetto a qualcuno che avrebbe fatto contro ritmo o qualunque poliritmia. Tutti noi avevamo gli strumenti di base per le nostre orecchie e questi pezzi di carta – molti, molti pezzi di carta – li abbiamo usati attraverso la nostra intuizione, nelle nostre migliori capacità cercando di discernere in questa massa di informazioni e portare ognuno delle nostre individualità. Quando ha cominciato a prendere forma, penso che tutti abbiamo sentito davvero come stava nascendo l’organizzazione del pezzo, quasi come se nessuno stesse ascoltando un accordo.

steve_proj_3_006_med res

Le precedenti esperienze di Steve Ball con “ensemble aperti” come i Tiny Orchestral Moments hanno avuto un ruolo fondamentale. Il booklet dell’album presenta un elenco di pratiche che hanno guidato le sessioni, indicando esplicitamente che provenivano dall’ensemble di Steve. Partendo da “Inizia con il silenzio” e poi finendo con “La distensione di Cleese”, questi possono essere confusi con il termine di “regole” da una mentalità che cerco di applicare una regola ad ogni meccanismo della vita come la mia. Invece, non hanno lo scopo di stabilire una direzione, o addirittura di preparare il musicista alle prove, ma ancor più di concentrarsi sull’evento a posteriori, da una prospettiva successiva ed esperienziale. Quando ho chiesto a Steve Ball se quelle erano regole che stabilivano il percorso, una sorta di regole di base fissate prima delle prove, ha fatto un lungo respiro, come se stesse facendo incetta di tutta la pazienza che avrebbe mai potuto avere, e con uno spirito calmo e inflessibile mi ha corretto con questo risposta articolata e rivelatrice: la maggior parte di quelle idee sono lì per riflettere a posteriori dopo che qualcosa é avvenuta. Non sono necessariamente utili come istruzioni o come qualche tipo di ricetta o formula. Per me, dopo anni a suonare in grandi ensemble in cui l’ego distrugge non solo il processo di ciò che si sta svolgendo, ma anche le vite e le relazioni delle persone che stavano collaborando insieme, ho sviluppato nel corso degli anni una serie di principi e pratiche che al momento giusto, attraverso l’osservazione giusta, [possono fare] ciò che potrebbe essere necessario per cambiare l’energia da uno stato di dispersione e di inquietudine e fornire storie divertenti per far in modo che le persone come note all’unisono ritornino a suonare insieme. Lasciare che la parte migliore dell’energia porti nella stanza la parte migliore dell’umorismo, dell’amore e della paura, trasformarla in qualcosa di trasformativo, in qualcosa che è necessario per mettere a fuoco ciò che conta. Trasformare questa energia in qualcosa che diventa parte della musica. Vedere tutti questi 10 musicisti impegnati in un progetto comune, queste parole e teorie al di fuori delle esperienze reali che condividi insieme può confondere, essere fuorviante, una perdita di tempo. Ma se sei alla fine del processo o alla fine della giornata e sei stanco e non ti senti come se tu potessi fare qualsiasi altra cosa, ti ricorderai che uno dei tuoi comici preferiti [John Cleese] aveva un principio per come sopravvivere al lavoro alla fine di una lunga giornata. Lui era solito andare avanti per un’ora in più, anche quando aveva finito o tutti gli altri se ne andavano e lui stava morendo. Quindi, come gruppo, se sei alla fine della tua benzina, ma ti fidi l’uno dell’altro e decidi di lasciar andare la tua stanchezza e lasciare andare quello che vuoi per te stesso e fare qualche sforzo in più, quelli possono essere momenti imprevedibili , senza prezzo, e momenti di concentrazione incredibile. Decidi di andare insieme al di là di ciò che potresti fare normalmente se sei solo in una modalità di riposo. Questo è un esempio di una pratica che sembra banale da dire, ma io la chiamo “distensione di Cleese” ed è solo un piccolo promemoria di come, quando hai finito e sei stanco, non devi fermarti, non devi dare al tuo corpo l’impulso di lasciare tutto. A volte può fare la differenza tra i momenti di album che non hanno errori, che ogni album incluso questo ha, rispetto a quando pensi “Oh, ce l’ho fatta” e hai messo un po’ di sforzo in più. Qualcosa di magico potrebbe emergere, perché riapplichi la tua energia per andare più in profondità o per andare più lontano di quanto tu non abbia potuto facendo se ti fidavi della tua stanchezza. La riflessione e la meditazione sulla performance fanno entrare il musicista in uno spazio più ampio di consapevolezza che si trasmette all’intero gruppo. Beth Flenoor spiega in pratica che ruolo abbiano il rispetto e l’importanza del silenzio in questo processo del partire dal silenzio e tornare al silenzio. Tutte queste frequenze si accumulano e diventano sempre più caotiche, si distendono e quindi si può respirare e ascoltare davvero l’interezza dell’ambiente e delle persone, degli io e delle intenzioni di tutti e poi ricominciare. Non è successo solo all’inizio o alla fine della giornata, ma era parte della routine continuare a ricordare a noi stessi di continuare a tornare su quel punto per costruire quella riserva di energia, per dare alla luce questo disco.

Tim Root è profondamente influenzato dalle sue esperienze come compositore di musica teatrale. La sua musica ha una sorta di cifra visiva. Prima della pubblicazione di Constance and the Waiting, ho chiesto a Marco Machera la sua opinione su questo lavoro e mi ha rivolto questa interessante risposta: quando abbiamo suonato tutto insieme, sembrava essere come un’opera unica. Il teatro e la narrativa sono fili rossi ricorrenti. La mia esperienza nell’opera teatrale ha una ruolo importante – dice Tim Root. Ho realizzato spettacoli teatrali, ho diretto concerti, ho lavorato nella musica per teatro. So come scegliere un’immagine, come raccontare una storia dal punto di vista musicale. Penso che come compositore, come arrangiatore, so che c’è un arco emotivo più lungo nel teatro, che penso ad inserire nel pezzo, per lasciare che si evolva per periodi di tipo teatrale e ti porti da qualche parte. Palasidai è un grande esempio di ciò. Un delicato accordo maggiore arpeggiato ondeggia tra la tonica, la seconda maggiore, la terza e torna indietro prima di appoggiarsi delicatamente a un accordo di 7a diminuito nell’intro di Palasidai. Quando ci spostiamo alla strofa, il violino, il clarinetto e il sax conducono una melodia cromatica che attraversa gli accordi, fino a quando la cadenza non porta al tema principale dal sapere elegiaco e pastorale suonato dal sassofono, mentre la band a completare lo supporta con un muro estatico di suoni. Ci sono lampi di fonte ai nostri occhi, siamo sollevati, voliamo come su una melodia arcaica e tanti temi celebri tornano nella nostra mente. Us and them dei Pink Floyd forse? – da ascoltare come l’ultima nota termina sull’accordo diminuito. O forse la colonna sonora di alcuni film classici? -I fan del cinema italiano potrebbero pensare a Samba Fortuna di Piero Piccioni, il tema principale della colonna sonora de Il Professor Guido Tersilli. Questa é la maniera in cui suonano le grandi melodie composte dai grandi compositori.

La prima parte di Palasidai termina con una variazione sul tema cromatico, una medianità cromatica che si sposta da un accordo maggiore a un altro accenna Tim Root, che dimostra ancora una volta la sapienza del lavoro della band nella disposizione del contrappunto. Il movimento verso la seconda parte è quasi impercettibile: come quando il pubblico sta già battendo le mani quando termina un grande momento di tensione durante lo spettacolo, o come muoversi sulla cima di una montagna. Ma la band continua a suonare. Ora la tensione ricresce, tutto sta crescendo, tutto sta drammaticamente aumentando come un’onda oceanica. Signore e signori, ecco a voi Beth Flenoor! Una miscela impressionante di ringhi, echi, suoni, enigmi irrisolvibili, una sorta di esperanto di espressioni che mescola sillabe dall’inglese, dal francese e da qualunque cosa possa scatenare un’emozione. Tim Root lo racconta come un momento di magia: quello che Beth fa vedere lì è il suo linguaggio. Lei e io non abbiamo parlato molto, perché Beth è magica. Ho imparato a lasciare che Beth faccia ciò che Beth fa. Lei è magica. È tutto, basta dire ‘vai, per favore fai quello che sai fare meglio’ e lei lo fa. Ma se dovessi indovinare, direi che ciò che Beth ha sviluppato è un insieme di istruzioni performative che le permettono di improvvisare una lingua. Penso che sia fantastico. Beth Flenoor a sua volta racconta di come tutto questo è venuto alla luce: inizialmente mi sono seduta per lavorare su questa musica come clarinettista. Appena Tim ce l’ha suonata dal vivo al pianoforte, eseguendola a memoria, dal profondo del suo cuore, ed eravamo in questa stanza dove tutti ci eravamo riuniti per questa volta, ho immediatamente sentito ciò che potevo suonarci. Parte della mia pratica è quella di non ignorarlo mai quando ti chiama, rispondi al telefono e fallo uscire. Quell’intera sezione non era pre-meditata o preparata o pensata, era una risposta emotiva piena e un’integrazione a ciò che sentivo e a ciò che la musica stava chiedendo. Negli ultimi 11 anni ho consciamente lavorato con musica basata sulla mia lingua: è successo per tutta la mia vita, ne sono stata molto consapevole come compositore, usando questo linguaggio basato sulle sillabe per andare direttamente al centro di una risposta emotiva, non legata a nessuna definizione di parole. Quelle parole, in qualunque lingua siano proferite, sono come microscopi che guardano a sentimenti molto più profondi. Questo linguaggio sillabico consiste nel bypassare tutti questi centri di senso ed andare direttamente a una risposta emotiva e qualunque cosa ti richieda come ascoltatore. Questa è la lingua in cui scrivo la mia musica. È la lingua che uso quando mi muovo in tutto il mondo e parlo con persone o esperienze anche quando nessun altro nella stanza non lo sa, ma è così che mi interfaccio con l’esistenza in generale. Per me è stato solo il permesso di aprire la porta e lasciare che questa cosa venisse fuori dalla richiesta che mi era stata fatta.

steve_proj_3_052_medres.jpeg

Pensiamo a Birdland dei Weather Report appena suona la sottile e veloce linea di accordi discendenti nell’introduzione di Venice of the Sky. Alessandro Inolti alterna colpi potenti a pause più frequenti, rendendo più facile il confronto tra l’approccio percussivo di Carl Palmer e l’aggressività ironica di Mike Portnoy. Passando attraverso gli assoli destrutturati di Bill Horist, e poi di Amy Denio, la traccia porta l’ascoltatore attraverso momenti stravaganti e parti più propulsive fino all’assolo finale di Nora Germain al violino. Tim riconosce il suo contributo in questo modo: Nora é stata un suggerimento di Steve. L’ha portata dentro per diversi motivi. Sa suonare ogni nota dell’album, è una musicista immacolata. Lei può suonare tutto ciò che vuole. È una persona molto veloce ad apprendere. Aveva familiarità con il modo in cui Steve lavorava con i gruppi, l’approccio dei Tiny Orchestral Moments. Il ruolo del violino in termini di arrangiamento lo abbiamo lasciato semplicemente evolvere. Abbiamo lasciato che il suo orecchio decidesse dove usare il violino, per accentuare le melodie, per accentuare le parti ritmiche, ciò che fa.

Solo apparentemente destrutturata, Hollow by Footsteps è una romanza delicata e romantica da 21esimo secolo. Il violino e il clarinetto dialogano intensamente con il pianoforte, passando da uno stato riflessivo ad uno di agitazione più volte, dando evidenza al suono di pianoforte di Tim e del lavoro di Jonathan Plum come ingegnere del suono. L’aggressività ritorna in modo improvviso nella traccia del finale, Joey. Si muove in modo eccentrico attraverso un palpitante battito in 9. Joey è la prima composizione di Tim Root in termini di tempo – è stata composta nel 1984. Anche in questo caso un contrappunto molto elaborato, un orientamento progressive ed un vasto uso dei cromatismi fanno riferimento alla classica, all’avanguardia fino all’heavy metal. Attraverso frequenti avvii e arresti, arriviamo a un picco di aggressività quando i temi principali ritornano e il finale è con la band tutta insieme al suo massimo.

Analizzare da dove provengono tutte le influenze di Constance and the Waiting potrebbe rivelarsi un esercizio di meticolosità fine a se stessa e fastidiosa. Piuttosto, sono d’accordo con l’esempio di Tim su come approcciare qualsiasi tentativo di etichettarla: un paio di giorni dopo aver registrato la nostra musica ero ad uno show degli EchoTest a Seattle e stavo parlando con Julie fuori dal locale dopo il loro set. Un tizio si é avvicinato e ha chiesto a Julie ‘che tipo di musica suoni? come si chiama questa musica?’. È la domanda più difficile per un musicista a cui rispondere e penso che la sua risposta sia stata meravigliosa: “Suono musica bellissima!”. Quindi qual’è la colla che mantiene questo disco, che ci fa sentire parte di un’opera e costruisce quella linea invisibile attraverso i suoi 40 minuti? Julie Slick indica una direzione: puoi dire che tutto questo proviene dallo stesso compositore perché c’è una visione chiara sotto. Se l’ingrediente segreto di Constance and the Waiting sia stato una visione chiara durante il processo di composizione o creare un team di lavoro perfettamente oliato, difficile stabilirlo. Questi 10 musicisti, però, sono stati in grado di entrare nella “Zona” di ispirazione, andare avanti per un’ora supplementare e creare un risultato originale e senza precedenti.

Troot
Constance and the Waiting
1. Axe for the Frozen Sea Within
2. Dance Elena
3. Palasidai
4. Venice of the Sky
5. Hollow by Footsteps
6. Joey

Steve Ball – acoustic guitar
Amy Denio – saxophone and accordion
Alex Anthony Faide – guitar
Beth Fleenor – clarinets and voice
Nora Germain – violin
Bill Horist – guitar and prepared guitar
Alessandro Inolti – drums
Marco Machera – bass
Tim Root – piano and keyboards
Julie Slick – bass

www.facebook.com/trootmusic/
http://trootmusic.com

Troot – Constance and the Waiting [2018] pt.1

Interviews with Troot members from April to August 2018

Second part
Italian version below

Some years ago I was invited by a friend at a dinner in a fancy high-profile restaurant in Milan. Purpose of the event was not quite eating, but cooking for others, even though none there was even an amateur cook. I was thrown in a company of strangers, whom I soon understood were high potential fast-riser young managers, for playing a serious game to test our skills of team working. As soon as we were divided in teams and commissioned to create a menu for guests at our own will, we were to play our management skills and show how good we were at working with others. But only egos emerged. People started approaching others in a grandstanding fashion, with alpha dogs communication styles, speaking up, and finally the room’s heat turning up. Then all of a sudden everything fixed, everybody calmly matching work duties. How was that magic happening? I slowly grasped it happened as a seasoned quiet man sat at the end of the table where all of us we were working aside. He had silently set the rules, facilitated assignment of tasks, restored the focus on purpose. I afterward acknowledged his effort and understood how he played such an important and reserved role by coordinating everyone.

When I had chance to meet with TROOT members -a large ensemble consisting in ten out of boundaries musicians coming each from such diverse backgrounds- this memory resonated to me. In October 2017 Tim Root and Steve Ball gathered musicians that have barely known each other before to the cozy and reserved Bear Creek studios, near Seattle, to play 40 minutes of unpublished, highly structured and falling outside of easy labeling music composed by Root himself. They were to spend 3 days immersed to arrange, play and record music requiring highly demanding effort. The challenges of so diverse people sitting in the same room for playing such demanding music were the highest. No surprise that Beth Fleenor, clarinetist and vocalist, remembers the initial challenges through this metaphor: When it started it looked like a busy kitchen in a fantastic restaurant preparing an incredible meal, where everybody jumps in and there are people preparing thing, people seasoning thing, people managing the grill and people managing salads and desserts. And it all comes out of the kitchen and it looks just beautiful and tastes delicious and you don’t see the chaos and the compression that was happening behind it, but if feels like something much bigger than its indivudal parts. We are a good kitchen team!

Constance and the Waiting, the outcome coming off from these sessions, is an exquisite menu of star chefs-made recipes that wheats the appetites of tasters looking for highly complex music as well as pure melodic delicacy, always looking at the past with a flavor of something you haven’t heard exactly before, perfectly balancing a mixture of ingredients. Where flavors sometimes point to classic prog Keith Emerson or King Crimson’s Red or ThraK or to avant-prog efforts or to 19th century classical music and even serial music, this is not a dish you tasted ever before. Echoing Julie Slick‘s words: it is very complex, heady, very proggy, very classical, chamber, fusion, chamber prog! The line-up is built around composer and piano player Tim Root, who is always there through all the recording. Around him a crowd of three guitarists so different each one from the other: Bill Horist, Alex Anthony Faide and Steve Ball. Then let’s the orchestral section in, or like Tim Root indicates ‘The Section’, with Nora Germain at violin, Amy Denio at saxophones and Beth Flenoor at clarinets. Last but not least the rhythm section, elongated at two basses, Julie Slick and Marco Machera, plus Alessandro Inolti at drum stole, the last three representing EchoTest band in full force.

It all started when Tim Root got in contact with Steve Ball, who says: Tim sent me an email in Oct 2016 and we are old friends, we go back to the mid-nineties to the real time that we met in the Seattle area. In addition to being famous among King Crimson‘s fanbase for having recreated current Discipline logo -notably you can see that on latest On and the Off the Road boxset, Steve Ball is a guitarist and a point of reference in Seattle area for his work in Fripp’s Guitar Craft workshops since the very start in the 80’s, having founded local Guitar Craft circle, and for working with improvisation in large ensembles, namely with Tiny Orchestral Moments. The idea was to take the kinds of interactions and structures about working together in large ensembles and to apply them to the six compositions that Tim had been working on. I pulled some headphones and I listened to the pieces. As each one flew by, I walked up more and more to the idea how insane it would be to trying get any humans to play this music. How amazing it would be if we got some world class players, who might just take a leap of faith, take on the insanity of this music and make it happen together in a compact super-accelerated format by living together, rehearsing together, recording together. I essentially said ‘yes I love this music and let’s find a way to pull the other team to make this happen’!

steve_proj_3_029_highres

The two became the men setting the purposes, taking care of the selection of the members and the glue of the team. Tim RootSteve as a facilitator of collaborations is in my opinion without peer. He took this group of people, most whom had not met. I knew four or five people, but none knew everyone. We took this group of people who had never played together and Steve immediately established the right ground rules that would allow us to remove all the tension. This made everything possible. This is his magic. I think more than anything else Steve is a fantastic musician, a great friend and all the other great things he does, but as a facilitator of collaboration he is just without peer. He just opened up everybody. This was very hard what we were trying to do. The music is challenging we had a very short timeframe. You had to set your ego aside and just figure it out, do the work and we worked very long days. We were exhausted by the time it was over. We became a family so quickly. Putting together an heterogeneous band was quite the strength and not the weakness of the project. So Julie Slick was approached by Steve Ball during Tiny Orchestral Moments‘ rehearsals, immediately after Three of a Perfect Pair camp [in August 2017] and she was able to bring her fellows in as well: he [Steve] asked me if I could recommend a drummer for Troot project and I already knew that EchoTest was going to be playing shows in East coast. So we are already arranging the tour and we have Alessandro playing drums for that. And when it turned out that Marco Machera was available to support the project recording as he was in Seattle as well, they wanted him in as well. 

Axe from the Frozen Sea Within is a perfect showcase of what this ensemble can do when stepping on the throttle. The band at full beats two thundering major chords placed at a distance of an unexpected third minor and enriched by powerful augmented 5ths and added on occasional 4ths on the bass, until it modulates twice up a third in a peaceful mood. It all prepares for the unison proggy theme in 7 played by piano first and then by all instruments. They alternate playing this theme in multiple variations on the lower and higher register as it progresses in a minor cadence. The rising tension erupts in a complicate theme full of big leaps through complicated intervals that almost brings my memory in with the funky efforts by Italian ensemble SlivovitzThat’s almost serial. I think there’s one note in there I decided to change, but that line is serial, that’s a dodecaphonic line, I think diminished chords, Tim Root explains. It all clashes in prolonged plateau on chords that seem to avoid any cadence, while Alessandro Inolti‘s powerful hitting is absent. Finally a new theme comes in with the band now back at full force: rhythmic guitars play a two-chord riff in 6 while piano, second guitar and rest of the instruments counterpoint it with an ecstatic driving punch that hints clearly at King Crimson‘s Lark’s Tongues in Aspic. Tim RootThe title of the first track, Axe from the Frozen Sea Within, it is a Kafka’s quote. The full quote is ‘A book must be the axe for the frozen sea within us’. When I came across the quote, it resonated to me, because what I think I found out in this album is my voice, finally. 

Tim Root might be unknown for progressive rock fans, mostly because he is holding a wealth of experience in the composing, conducting and sound designing for classical music first. With a past education in composition by some of the mavericks of the avant garde, he also received piano instruction from a student of Rachmaninoff. Not a surprise since the 19th century piano music is a clear influence in all Troot‘s Constance and the Waiting. But the surprise comes when he indicates two among most important guitarists as his epiphanies: I think more interesting is that at some point my playing began to take influence more of guitar players. I went to college in 1981. In that year two albums came out, one was King Crimson’s Discipline and the other was Fred Frith’s Speechless, one of two Frith’s early solo albums. Both albums affected me as a musicians. 

Constance and the Waiting is an overcomposed multilayered effort, which might hardly be brought as an example of the current status of improvisation. Still improvisation was kind of the ghost in the room during the sessions. When asked about where this record would stay in an ideal line where at one end there’s complete writing and the other free improvisation, Tim Root explains more why he was so influenced by Fripp and FrithSpeechless [by Fred Frith] is much more improvisatory, much more open, much more free jazz. And then you got the discipline of Discipline [featuring Robert Fripp]. Both things really affected me at exact the right time. I wanted to put a group of players able to play both. To play all this free improvisatory music that Fred Frith was writing and play all this disciplined music that Fripp was doing. There are two different schools of improvisation for these players [Troot players] as well, and the group is really split down the middle. There are free improvisers like myself, Beth Flenoor, Amy Denio, who will just sit and play -and Bill Horist as well. We would just sit and play completely free. I think about the other improvisers, Julie Slick, Steve Ball, Marco Machera and Alex Anthony Faide that their type of improvisation is a different approach. Steve talks a lot about improvisation that sounded like written music and written music that sounds like improvisations. I am playing with that idea as well. Layered on the top of that, the improvisation came more from knowing I had players who knew how to listen carefully and determine the right part, because the arrangements were figured out organically as a group.

steve_proj_3_044

Another maverick, this time the progressive rock legend Keith Emerson, played a huge influence in Tim Root‘s life: I heard Emerson, Lake and Palmer’s triple live album Welcome Back my Friends when I was in 8th grade, at exactly the right moment. I was 14 yrs old. He [Emerson] plays for 3 hrs long and he makes two mistakes! How do you do that? There’s two errors in there somewhere. Keith was from another planet. That was entirely another level of ‘How my God how do you do that?’. The fierce and exploding scales up and down at start of Dance Elena are the perfect tribute to the Emerson, Lake and Palmer. Root exploits such an urgent groove on each key of the piano that he seems to quote closely the inner sense of driving that Emerson was imprinting at each note he played. Two rounds on a crazy roller coaster in the same theme, the second time the melody transposed an half step higher and then modulating up, as Tim Root analyzes. The main theme of this track goes long by in the past, more precisely composed 17 years ago. All members play what is probably their most virtuoso outcome in the overall album, while the mood moves seamlessly from driving rhythmic power chords by guitars to funny theatrical back-and-forths between the members, all played at crazy speed of light.

Troot
Constance and the Waiting
1. Axe for the Frozen Sea Within
2. Dance Elena
3. Palasidai
4. Venice of the Sky
5. Hollow by Footsteps
6. Joey

Steve Ball – acoustic guitar
Amy Denio – saxophone and accordion
Alex Anthony Faide – guitar
Beth Fleenor – clarinets and voice
Nora Germain – violin
Bill Horist – guitar and prepared guitar
Alessandro Inolti – drums
Marco Machera – bass
Tim Root – piano and keyboards
Julie Slick – bass

www.facebook.com/trootmusic/
http://trootmusic.com

Second part

Versione in italiano

Qualche anno fa sono stato invitato da un amico a cena in un ristorante stellato a Milano. Scopo dell’evento non era propriamente una cena, ma cucinare per altri, anche se nessuno dei presenti era nemmeno un cuoco da Masterchef. Sono stato catapultato in una compagnia di estranei, che ho capito presto essere giovani manager rampanti, riuniti li per un gioco seri, ovvero mettere alla prova le capacità di lavorare in team. Dopo esser stati divisi in squadre ed aver ricevuto l’incarico di creare un menu per gli ospiti a nostro piacimento, ognuno doveva mettere a disposizione le proprie capacità manageriali. Ma è emerso solo l’ego degli astanti, tra voglia di mettersi in mostra, comportamenti da maschi alfa, voci che si alzano, così come la temperatura. Poi all’improvviso tutto si è rimesso posto, tutti hanno iniziato a svolgere il loro lavoro. Com’è successa questa magia? L’ho capito ad un certo punto quando ho notato un signore che sedeva alla fine del tavolo dove tutti noi stavamo lavorando. Aveva silenziosamente fissato in silenzio le regole, facilitato l’assegnazione dei compiti, ripristinato l’attenzione sullo scopo del gruppo. In seguito ho riconosciuto il suo impegno e ho capito come aveva svolto un ruolo così importante e riservato coordinando tutti.

Quando ho avuto il piacere di incontrare i membri di Troot – un ensemble formato da dieci musicisti fuori da ogni limite provenienti ognuno da ambienti molto differenti – questo ricordo mi è tornato alla mente. Nell’ottobre del 2017 Tim Root e Steve Ball hanno riunito alcuni musicisti che si conoscevano a malapena negli accoglienti e riservati studi di Bear Creek, vicino a Seattle, per suonare 40 minuti di musica inedita, altamente strutturati e al di fuori di una facile categorizzazione, composta da Root stesso. Dovevano trascorrere 3 giorni immersi per provare, suonare e registrare musica che richiedesse uno sforzo molto impegnativo. La sfida di prendere persone così diverse e farle sedere nella stessa stanza per suonare musica così esigente era molto alta. Non sorprende che Beth Fleenor, clarinettista e cantante, ricordi i momenti attraverso questa metafora: quando abbiamo iniziato sembrava una cucina affollata in un fantastico ristorante che preparava portate incredibile, dove tutti saltano da una parte all’altra. Dove ci sono persone che preparano cose, qualcuno che condisce qualcosa , persone che gestiscono la griglia e persone che gestiscono insalate e dessert. E tutto esce dalla cucina e sembra semplicemente bello e ha un sapore delizioso e non si vede il caos e la compressione che sta succedendo dietro di esso, ma se si sente come qualcosa di molto più grande delle sue parti indivuduali. Siamo una buona squadra da cucina!

Constance and the Waiting, il risultato di queste sessioni, è uno squisito menu di ricette da chef stellato che stimola l’appetito degli assaggiatori alla ricerca di una musica estremamente complessa e di pura delicatezza melodica, guardando sempre al passato con un sapore di qualcosa che non si è sentito esattamente prima, bilanciando perfettamente una miscela di ingredienti variegati. Alcune volte i sapori puntano al classico prog di Keith Emerson o dei King Crimson di Red o THRAK o agli sforzi avant-prog o alla musica classica del XIX secolo e persino alla musica seriale: comunque questo non è un piatto che avrete mai assaggiato. Riprendendo le parole di Julie Slick per definirlo: è molto complesso, cervellotico, molto prog, molto classico, da camera, fusion, un chamber prog! La line-up è costruita attorno al compositore e pianista Tim Root, che è sempre presente in ogni momento. Intorno a lui una folla di tre chitarristi così diversi l’uno dall’altro: Bill Horist, Alex Anthony Faide e Steve Ball. Quindi andiamo alla sezione orchestrale, o come Tim Root indica ‘The Section’, con Nora Germain al violino, Amy Denio ai sassofoni e Beth Flenoor ai clarinetti. E per finire la sezione ritmica, allungata a due bassi, Julie Slick e Marco Machera, più Alessandro Inolti alla stola di batteria, ovvero tutti e tre gli EchoTest.

Tutto è iniziato quando Tim Root ha contattato Steve Ball, che racconta: Tim mi ha mandato una mail a ottobre 2016. Siamo vecchi amici, da metà degli anni ’90 al tempo in cui ci siamo conosciuti a Seattle. Oltre ad essere famoso tra i fan di King Crimson per aver ricreato l’attuale logo di Discipline –è possibile vederlo nella copertina del box On e Off the Road, Steve Ball è un chitarrista e un punto di riferimento nell’area di Seattle per il suo lavoro nel Guitar Craft fin dagli inizi con Robert Fripp, per aver fondato il circolo locale del Guitar Craft e per aver lavorato con l’improvvisazione in grandi ensemble, in particolare con i Tiny Orchestral Moments. L’idea era di prendere il tipo di interazioni e strutture che utilizzavamo per lavorare insieme in grandi ensemble e applicarle alle sei composizioni su cui Tim stava lavorando. Ho preso le cuffie e ho ascoltato i pezzi. Mentre scorrevano, mi sono avvicinato sempre più all’idea di quanto sarebbe stato folle tentare di far suonare questa musica a qualsiasi essere umano. Sarebbe stato incredibile se avessimo avuto musicisti di livello mondiale, che avrebbero semplicemente potuto crederci, affrontare la follia di questa musica e farla accadere insieme in un contesto super accelerato, compatto, vivendo insieme, provando insieme, registrando insieme. In sostanza ho detto “Sì, amo questa musica e troviamo un modo per convincere la squadra a farlo accadere”!

steve_proj_3_029_highres

I due sono diventati gli uomini che guidavano il gruppo, curando la selezione dei musicisti e tenendo insieme la squadra. Tim Root: Steve come facilitatore è secondo me senza pari. Ha preso questo gruppo di persone, molte delle quali non si erano incontrate. Conoscevo quattro o cinque persone, ma nessuno conosceva nessuno. Abbiamo preso questo gruppo di persone che non avevano mai suonato insieme e Steve ha immediatamente stabilito le giuste regole di base, che ci avrebbero permesso di rimuovere tutta la tensione. Questo ha reso tutto possibile. Questa è la sua magia. Penso che più di ogni altra cosa Steve sia un musicista fantastico, un grande amico e tutte le altre grandi cose che fa, ma come facilitatore è senza pari. Ha fatto in modo che tutti si aprissero. È stato molto difficile quello che stavamo cercando di fare. La musica è difficile, avevamo un tempo molto breve. Dovevi mettere da parte il tuo ego e capirlo, fare il lavoro e abbiamo lavorato per giornate molto lunghe. Eravamo esausti al momento in cui era finita. Siamo diventati una famiglia così rapidamente. Mettere insieme una band eterogenea è stata la forza e non la debolezza del progetto. Julie Slick è stata contattata da Steve Ball durante le prove dei Tiny Orchestral Moments, subito dopo il camp dei Three of a Perfect Pair [ad agosto 2017] ed anche lei è stata in grado di coinvolgere altri: [Steve] mi ha chiesto se potevo raccomandare un batterista per il progetto Troot e sapevo già che EchoTest avrebbe suonato in spettacoli nella costa orientale. Stavano già organizzando il tour ed avevamo Alessandro che suonava la batteria. E quando è venuto fuori che Marco Machera era disponibile anche lui perché era a Seattle con gli altri due, anche lui è entrato a farne parte.

Axe for the Frozen Sea Within è una perfetta dimostrazione di ciò che questo ensemble può fare quando preme sull’acceleratore. La band al completo batte due tonanti accordi maggiori messi alla distanza di un inattesa terza minore e arricchiti da potenti quinte ed aggiunte con 4 seconde sul basso, fino a quando non modula due volte una terza in alto in una pace liberatoria. Tutto si prepara per il tema all’unisono che batte in 7, suonato prima dal piano e poi da tutti gli strumenti. Si alternano giocando su questo tema in più varianti sul registro inferiore e superiore mentre si procede in una cadenza minore. La crescente tensione esplode in un tema complicato, pieno di grandi balzi attraverso intervalli complicati,che quasi mi riporta alla memoria con il funky dell’ensemble italiano Slivovitz. È quasi seriale. Penso che ci sia una nota fuori che ho deciso di cambiare, ma quella linea è seriale, quella è una linea dodecafonica, penso che siano accordi diminuiti, spiega Tim Root. Tutto collassa in un prolungato plateau su accordi che sembrano evitare cadenze, mentre la batteria potente di Alessandro Inolti è assente. Finalmente arriva un nuovo tema con la band tornata a piena forza: le chitarre ritmiche suonano un riff su due accordi in 6 mentre il piano, la seconda chitarra e il resto degli strumenti fanno da contrappunto con un piglio estatico che allude chiaramente a Lark’s Tongues in Aspic dei King Crimson. Tim Root: il titolo della prima traccia, Axe for the Frozen Sea Within, è una citazione di Kafka. La citazione completa è “Un libro deve essere l’ascia per il mare ghiacciato dentro di noi”. Quando ho trovato la citazione, mi è venuta in mente, perché quello che penso di aver trovato in questo album è la mia voce, finalmente.

Tim Root potrebbe essere sconosciuto per i fan del progressive rock, soprattutto perché ha una vasta esperienza nella composizione, direzione e sound design nell’ambito della musica classica principalmente. Dopo aver studiato composizione con alcuni dei maestri più eterodossi dell’avanguardia, ha studiato pianoforte con un insegnante che aveva precedentemente studiato con Rachmaninoff. Non è una sorpresa dal momento che la musica per pianoforte del 19 ° secolo è una chiara influenza in tutto Constance and the Waiting di Troot. Ma la sorpresa arriva quando indica due tra i più importanti chitarristi come le sue epifanie musicali: penso che sia più interessante il fatto che a un certo punto il mio modo di suonare abbia cominciato ad essere influenzato maggiormente dai chitarristi. Sono andato al college nel 1981. In quell’anno uscirono due album, uno era Discipline dei King Crimson e l’altro era Speechless di Fred Frith, uno dei primi album solisti di Frith. Entrambi gli album mi hanno influenzato come musicista.

Constance and the Waiting è un risultato con molti livelli di complessità, che potrebbe difficilmente essere portato come esempio dello stato attuale dell’improvvisazione, vista la preponderanza della scrittura. Eppure, l’improvvisazione è stata una specie di fantasma nella stanza durante le sessioni. Alla domanda su dove questo disco si situerebbe in una linea ideale dove ad una estremità c’è la scrittura completa e l’altra la libera improvvisazione, Tim Root spiega più perché è stato così influenzato da Fripp e Frith: Speechless [di Fred Frith] è molto più improvvisativo, molto più aperto, molto più free jazz. E poi è arrivata la disciplina di Discipline [con Robert Fripp]. Entrambe le cose mi hanno davvero colpito esattamente al momento giusto. Volevo mettere un gruppo di musicisti in grado di suonare entrambi. Per suonare tutta questa musica improvvisata, free a la Fred Frith e suonare tutta la musica disciplinata che Fripp stava facendo. C’erano due diverse scuole di improvvisazione per questi musicisti [i musicisti di Troot], e il gruppo è davvero diviso a metà. Improvvisatori free come me, Beth Flenoor, Amy Denio, che siedono e suonano – e anche Bill Horist. Ci sedevamo e suonavamo completamente free. Penso agli altri improvvisatori, Julie Slick, Steve Ball, Marco Machera e Alex Anthony Faide. Il loro tipo di improvvisazione segue un approccio diverso. Steve parla molto di improvvisazione che sembra musica scritta e musica scritta che suona come improvvisazioni. Mi sono avvicinato a quell’idea. Alla fin dei conti l’improvvisazione derivava più dal sapere che avevo musicisti che sapevano ascoltare attentamente e determinare la parte giusta, perché gli arrangiamenti venivano decisi organicamente come un entità di gruppo.

steve_proj_3_044

Un altro anticonformista, questa volta la leggenda del rock progressivo Keith Emerson, ha avuto un’enorme influenza nella vita di Tim Root: ho sentito Emerson, il triplo album live di Lake and Palmer, Welcome Back my Friends, quando ero in terza media, esattamente nel momento giusto. Avevo 14 anni. Lui [Emerson] suona per 3 ore e fa due errori! Come si fa a farlo? Ci sono due sbavature lì da qualche parte. Keith proveniva da un altro pianeta. Era di un altro livello da “Mio Dio come lo fai?”. Le feroci e esplosive scale su e giù all’inizio di Dance Elena sono il tributo perfetto per Emerson, Lake e Palmer. Root sfrutta un groove così stringente su ciascun tasto del pianoforte che sembra citare da vicino il senso di urgenza ed anticipazione che Emerson imprimeva ad ogni nota che suonava. Due su e giù su un ottovolante nello stesso tema, la seconda volta la melodia trasposta di mezzo tono più in alto e poi modula, come analizza Tim Root. Il tema principale di questa traccia è stato scritto parecchio lontano nel passato, più precisamente 17 anni fa. Tutti i membri suonano probabilmente al loro massimo virtuosismo, mentre l’atmosfera si muove senza intoppi da accordi ritmici distortissimi con le chitarre a condurre a buffi botte e risposta dal sapore teatrale tra i musicisti, il tutto giocato ad una pazza velocità della luce.

Troot
Constance and the Waiting
1. Axe for the Frozen Sea Within
2. Dance Elena
3. Palasidai
4. Venice of the Sky
5. Hollow by Footsteps
6. Joey

Steve Ball – acoustic guitar
Amy Denio – saxophone and accordion
Alex Anthony Faide – guitar
Beth Fleenor – clarinets and voice
Nora Germain – violin
Bill Horist – guitar and prepared guitar
Alessandro Inolti – drums
Marco Machera – bass
Tim Root – piano and keyboards
Julie Slick – bass

www.facebook.com/trootmusic/
http://trootmusic.com

Quartet Diminished – Station Two [Hermes Records 2018]

Review + short interview with Ehsan Sadig

Italian version below

My goal was to form a band with musicians with different backgrounds and tastes. As a guitar player progressive and metal music have influenced me most. Our drummer, Rouzbeh Fadavi, comes from more jazzy background, our pianist, Mazyar Younesi, is graduated in classical music and also a conductor, and our woodwind player, Soheil Peyghambari, has more folk music background. Ehsan Sadigh, guitarist and one of the founders of Teheran based Quartet Diminished, points very clearly in his words at what were his purposes since the start of his band. Different identities collide in four different people’ backgrounds, western and eastern cultures clash, electric clashes with acoustic, Iranian classical clashes with western jazz and metal. Quartet Diminished is first and foremost a battle scene, where notes, modes, rhythms bring their history in and meet.

But wouldn’t this mix of influences risk to fall into chaos? Musicologist Carl Dalhaus once told that we should not talk about ‘identities’ in music, better to use the word ‘Wesen‘. The translation of this german term might be ‘being’, or better ‘consciousness of being’. When human beings are born, they gradually start creating their consciousness by difference: I am not the world outside [Marcello Sorce Keller Identities in traditional and western musics in Enciclopedia della Musica, Il Sole 24 Ore]. An identity is built upon a difference with other identities. This approach applied to music hints at how every culture might be seen as a separate from another. In the speed of light collapsing universe of today’s music cultures, bringing together the more distant sounds is becoming the rule. And the result is often a chaos producing system of multiple influences blended together. But is mixing cultures creating a new identity or is it just a plain juxtapositions of sounds? From my point of view as listener, I appreciate when the culture clashing process creates new identities. If you are looking for this option as well, then put Quartet Diminished on the top of your wishlist.

Take the sixteen minutes of Cluster, third track of their 2018 effort Station Two. While the length might surely appeal progressive rock fans, this is not exactly a typical ‘prog epic’, nor a classical suite. But something that fits in the middle. The slightly disturbing repetitions of piano intro’s power chords pave the road for the drums and guitar’ grandeur metal entry. Piano and bass clarinet answers back each distorted chord, but there’s not time left to start the headbanging. A sudden interruption places the piano back in. Younesi initiates a rubato dialogue with Peyghambari‘s saxophone with a sort of dorian mode feeling. An unison cascading line played by piano and guitar falls at the moment when the bass clarinet and drums may start back the sound and fury.

These frequent start and stops are the core of Quartet Diminished‘s music, thanks to the unique approach of the only single rhythmic element of the band, the drummer Rouzbeh Fadavi. A disquieting sense of disruption of our concept of the uninterrupted standard western song. If we take the perspective of traditional Iranian classical music and the music system of the avaz, which is based on the sequences of different moods and modes -to roughly translate that, then this structure seems no wonder. Ehsan Sadig offers his point of view on the traditional Iranian music: The influence of Iranian rhythms and melodies has precipitated in our subconscious somehow. Therefore, we don’t use them deliberately in many occasions, they just penetrate in our music in a subtle way. Coming back to the point of Cluster we left off, the rhythmic section in 3+3+3+2 first explodes vigorously, then placidly moves back to intro theme, while Ehsan Sadig plays shrilling bendings over a phrygian traditional scale. Suddenly piano’s descending rumblings move the atmosphere to a rondo-style -with the absence of the drums- that morphs in an intricate 5+3+4 jazz-rock rhythmic section. When the drum enters again in, Peyghambari is left the space to fill with his intense and prolonged folk echoes. If we ever looked for a definition of Cluster, then this might be: a chamber electro-acoustic suite played by traditionally influenced progressive musicians [!]. 

Quartet Diminished are now approaching their second release, but their roots are in the initial line-up for the release as trio earlier in 2013. As Ehsan Sadig tells me: Our first band was called ‘Whisper’, including drums (Rouzbeh), Guitar (Me) and bass (Nima). When the bass player left the band, I decided to replace it with saxophone (Parviz). Diminished was the name of my first released album. Ending up being released under the name of Ehsan Sadig Trio, Diminished is a distinctive sound album: traditional music played in a ritual-like context. Instruments alternate often in solo or duos throughout the release, the rests are frequently taking the scene more than the music itself. A subtle sense of tension pervades this work, while guitar is not necessarily playing always and everywhere. With the entrance of new members, the project slightly changed its sound: Mazyar Younesi (pianist and conductor) joined the band shortly after Parviz (sax player) left the band, so I decided to make a new quartet band. Then Peter Soleimanipour joined the quartet as woodwind player and the first album of quartet diminished (Station One) got released. Published by Hermes records in 2015, Station One is an intricate rhythms shift and a leap forward in their music making. While polyrhythmic layers blink at postminimal european bands such as Nik Bärtsch, the sounds are taking nourishment from multiple sources at once, thanks also to the decision to make their project unique with no bass instrument. Traditional music, classical, jazz: Station One is taking the roads of unexpectedness. After Peter left the quartet, Soheil Peyghambari joined us as our new woodwind player about 2 years ago and with the new lineup the second album of Quartet Diminished (Station Two)

The eponymous track opening Station Two is already a showcase of how these multiple sources of influence may collide and meet. After Ehsan Sadig‘s scratching on guitar strings collapses in all-band avant-like noise, then the guitarist creates a groove with a simple hypnotic repetition of a single note. The tap-your-feet pattern that follows is enriched by Soheil Peyghambari‘s deep bass clarinet, that is easy to compare to the rhythmic efforts by swiss Sha. And then it breaks in a stopping tension opening for piano solo: slowly built around jazz and traditional music atmospheres, it moves in a similar direction to what others, such like Tigran Hamasyan, are doing by mixing western and eastern traditions in the contemporary context. The grand finale with its long and aggressive notes repeated by whole band,comes again after a pause. Tension and sudden rests: those are the rules in Quartet Diminished music. They are always looking at managing the tension of the track in some way in between traditional ritual and western avantgarde music. Ehsan puts it in very easy manner: Iranian folk music is one of our influences since the Iranian ritual music is a branch of Iranian folk music more or less, and we’ve heard those melodies and ballads from our early childhood via media and etc..

The following track, Zone, has even more metal chamber moments for Ehsan Sadig to show his wide array of techniques. Ranging from palm muted to power chord, tapping and sweep picking arpeggios, his efforts are never appearing as effortless virtuoso exhibitionism. The initial drum rolling -which incidentally Sadig indicates as having been inspired by a kurdish rhythm- works as the preparation for the subsequent polyrhythmic layering between piano playing in a 12 on 4 feeling and guitar following a 3+4+3+4+3+4 pattern. Quartet Diminished are frequently working with slow intertwining tempos, which seems to let more easily explode the thrilling solos by Sadig on guitar or the folk embellished lyrical melodies by Peyghambari

Moving through more pensive atmospheres, Mood II morphs in a Bärtsch-like ritual pattern after 5 minutes of dialogue between clarinet and guitar sustained by piano’s repeated chords. Then eventually explodes in a sort of orchestral finale via an ascending scale that liquefies the listener’s tension in a peaceful joy. Quartet Diminished alternates moments of improvisation to strictly written materials, often exposing it to multiple layers: Each track of ours is a result of a different procedure more or less, sometimes we extract the ideas from our improvises and then fix them by writing them. In other occasion, one of us might bring a written idea or phrase of his, then this written part will blend with improvises, individual ideas and transforms to a new creation which belongs to all of us. The closing Mood I is an ecstatic classical guitar work of art, we might find references someway in the Arabian music that influenced Spanish classical music. Clarinet is joining Sadig‘s delightful tunes in such a delicate manner that, when Younesi‘s lyrical voice enters in, it is almost impossible to distinguish each of them. They are moving us to an heavenly place we would like to sit in for the longest time possible.

Stations Two is a statement of identity from a band that moves in a unforeseen territory crossing avantgarde, ritual music, chamber orchestra and even metal and prog. Not a surprise that these guys are attracting the interest of so many fine producers such as Manfred Eicher or Leonardo Pavkovic. They are moving us in a modern ritual, a conscious and respectful ritual of the dialogue between multiple identities, that look at melting in a new identity.

Quartet Diminished
Station Two

1. Station Two
2. Zone
3. Cluster
4. Mood II
5. Projector
6. Mood I

Ehsan Sadig – electric guitar
Mazyar Younesi – piano, voice
Soheil Peyghambari – clarinet, bass clarinet, soprano saxophone
Rouzbeh Fadavi – drums

Hermes Records
http://www.hermesrecords.com/en/Ensembles/Diminished

Versione in italiano

Il mio obiettivo era formare una band con musicisti con background e gusti diversi. Come chitarrista, il progressive e la musica metal mi hanno influenzato di più. Il nostro batterista, Rouzbeh Fadavi, proviene da un ambiente più jazzistico, il nostro pianista, Mazyar Younesi, ha un diploma in musica classica ed è anche direttore d’orchestra, e il nostro fiatista, Soheil Peyghambari, viene da esperienze con la musica folk. Ehsan Sadigh, chitarrista e uno dei fondatori della band di Teheran Quartet Diminished, sottolinea molto chiaramente nelle sue parole cosa stava cercando sin dalla fondazione della sua band. Identità diverse si scontrano in quattro contesti diversi, si scontrano culture occidentali e orientali, l’elettrico che si scontra con l’acustico, musica classica iraniana con il jazz e il metal occidentali. Quartet Diminished è prima di tutto una battaglia, in cui note, modi, ritmi portano la loro storia e si incontrano.

Ma tutto questo incrocio di influenze non rischia di finire nel caos? Il musicologo Carl Dalhaus una volta disse che non dovevamo parlare di “identità” nella musica, ma era meglio usare la parola “Wesen“. La traduzione di questo termine tedesco potrebbe essere “essere”, o meglio “coscienza dell’essere”. Quando gli esseri umani nascono, gradualmente iniziano a creare la loro coscienza attraverso la differenziazione: io non sono il mondo esterno [Marcello Sorce Keller Identità nelle musiche tradizionali ed occidentali in Enciclopedia della Musica, Il Sole 24 Ore]. Un’identità si basa su una differenza con altre identità. Questo approccio applicato alla musica indica perché é possibile parlare di una cultura differenziata da un’altra. Nell’universo delle culture musicali di oggi, che collassano alla velocità della luce, riunire le sonorità più distanti da un punto di vista geografico o sociale sta diventando la regola. E il risultato è spesso un sistema che produce un caos di molteplici influenze mescolate insieme. Ma mescolare le culture significa creare una nuova identità o è solo una giusta giustapposizione di suoni? Dal mio punto di vista di ascoltatore, amo quando il processo di contrasto culturale crea nuove identità. Se é questo che state cercando, allora mettete i Quartet Diminished in cima alla vostra lista.

Prendiamo i sedici minuti di Cluster, terza traccia da Station Two del 2018. La lunghezza potrebbe sicuramente attrarre i fan del progressive rock, ma questa non è esattamente un prog epic, e neanche una suite da musica classica. Ma qualcosa che sta nel mezzo. Le ripetizioni inquietanti dei power chords di piano lasciano spazio all’intro di batteria e chitarra dal sapore di grandeur metal. Il clarinetto basso ed il pianoforte rispondono a ogni accordo distorto, ma non c’é tempo per iniziare l’headbanging. Un’improvvisa interruzione dà spazio improvvisamente al pianoforte. Younesi avvia un dialogo in rubato con il sassofono di Peyghambari ed i due galleggiano attorno al modo dorico. Una linea all’unisono tra piano e chitarra discende a cascata nel momento in cui il clarinetto basso e la batteria ricominciano a battere ad un ritmo infernale.

Queste frequenti pause e ripartenze sono il cuore della musica dei Quartet Diminished, grazie all’approccio unico del solo elemento ritmico della band, il batterista Rouzbeh Fadavi. Avvertiamo un inquietante senso di rottura del nostro concetto della canzone occidentale standard, abituati come siamo allo sviluppo ininterrotto del pezzo. Se consideriamo, invece, la prospettiva della musica classica iraniana classica e del sistema musicale dell’avaz, che si basa sulle sequenze di diversi stati d’animo e modi -per tradurre questo concetto in maniera veramente approssimativa, allora questa struttura non sembra sorprendente. Ehsan Sadig offre il suo punto di vista sulla musica tradizionale iraniana: L’influenza dei ritmi e delle melodie iraniani è in qualche modo precipitata nel nostro subconscio. Quindi, non li usiamo deliberatamente in molte occasioni, semplicemente penetrano nella nostra musica in modo sottile. Ritornando al punto di Cluster dove avevamo interrotto, una sezione ritmica in tempi composti da 3 + 3 + 3 + 2 esplode vigorosamente, poi torna placidamente al tema di introduzione, mentre Ehsan Sadig emette alcuni bending lancinanti su una scala tradizionale frigia. All’improvviso i turbinii discendenti del pianoforte spostano l’atmosfera verso uno stile rondò, con l’assenza della batteria, che si trasforma in una intricata sezione ritmica jazz-rock in tempi di 5 + 3 + 4. Quando la batteria entra di nuovo, a Peyghambari è lasciato uno spazio che può riempire con i suoi echi folk intensi e prolungati. Se mai avessimo cercato una definizione di Cluster, potrebbe essere: una suite elettroacustica da camera suonata da musicisti progressive influenzati dalla musica tradizionale [!].

I Quartet Diminished sono al loro secondo album, ma le loro radici risalgono alla line-up iniziale che all’inizio del 2013 ha pubblicato un disco precedente sotto diverso nome. Come Ehsan Sadig mi dice: Il nostro primo gruppo si chiamava “Whisper”, ed includeva  batteria (Rouzbeh), chitarra (Me) e basso (Nima). Quando il bassista ha lasciato la band ho deciso di sostituirlo con il sassofono (Parviz). Diminished era il nome del mio primo album pubblicato. Pubblicato, infine, con il nome di Ehsan Sadig Trio, Diminished è un album dal suono distinto ed unico: la musica tradizionale eseguita in un contesto da rituale. Gli strumenti si alternano in solo o in duetto, le pause spesso prendono la scena più della musica stessa. Un sottile senso di tensione pervade questo lavoro, mentre la chitarra non é necessariamente presente sempre e ovunque. Con l’ingresso di nuovi membri, il progetto ha leggermente modificato le sue sonorità: Mazyar Younesi (pianista e direttore d’orchestra) si è unito alla band poco dopo che Parviz (sassofonista) ha lasciato la band, così ho deciso di creare una nuova band in quartetto. Quindi Peter Soleimanipour si é unito al gruppo come fiatista e il primo album del Quartet Diminished (Station One) é stato pubblicato. Prodotto da Hermes Records nel 2015, Station One è un intricato cambio di ritmi e un salto in avanti nella loro produzione musicale. Mentre i livelli poliritmici fanno l’occhiolino ad artisti postminimali europei come Nik Bärtsch, le sonorità si nutrono da più fonti contemporaneamente, grazie anche all’unicità del suono della sezione ritmica priva di basso. Musica tradizionale, classica, jazz: Station One percorre strade imprevedibili. Dopo che Peter lasciò il quartetto, Soheil Peyghambari si unì a noi come nostro nuovo fiatista circa 2 anni fa e con la nuova formazione abbiamo prodotto il secondo album di Quartet Diminished (Station Two).

La traccia omonima che apre Station Two è già una vetrina di come queste molteplici influenze possano scontrarsi e incontrarsi. Dopo che Ehsan Sadig graffia il plettro sulle corde della chitarra, tutto crolla in un rumoristico avantgarde di tutta la band ed il chitarrista crea un groove con una semplice ripetizione ipnotica di una singola nota. Il pattern cadenzato che segue è arricchito dal profondo clarinetto basso di Soheil Peyghambari, che è facile confrontare l’arte ritmica dello svizzero Sha. E poi il pezzo si interrompe in un’apertura di tensione per favorire l’assolo di piano: costruito lentamente tra jazz e atmosfere di musica tradizionale, il solo si muove in una direzione simile a quella che altri, come Tigran Hamasyan, stanno facendo mescolando tradizioni occidentali e orientali nel contesto contemporaneo. Il gran finale con le sue note lunghe e aggressive ripetute da tutta la band, arriva di nuovo dopo una pausa. Tensione e pause improvvise: quelle sono le regole della musica dei Quartet Diminished. Provano sempre a gestire la tensione della traccia in qualche modo tra musica tradizionale rituale e avanguardia occidentale. Ehsan lo indica in modo molto semplice: La musica folk iraniana è una delle nostre influenze dal momento che la musica rituale iraniana è un ramo della musica popolare iraniana più o meno, e abbiamo ascoltato quelle melodie e ballate della nostra prima infanzia tramite media ed ecc..

La traccia seguente, Zone, ha ancora più momenti da metal cameristico, che permettono ad Ehsan Sadig di mostrare la sua vasta gamma di tecniche. Dal palm muting ai power chords, tapping ed arpeggi in sweep, le sue esplosioni non appaiono mai come esibizioni di virtuosismo fini a loro stesse. L’iniziale pattern della batteria – che per inciso Sadig indica essere stata ispirata da un ritmo curdo- fa da preparazione per la successiva stratificazione poliritmica tra il piano che suona in un 12/4 e la chitarra che segue con i tempi in 3 + 4 + 3 + 4 + 3 + 4. I Quartet Diminished frequentemente lavorano con tempi che si intrecciano lentamente, che sembra far esplodere più facilmente gli assoli elettrizzanti di Sadig alla chitarra o le melodie impreziosite di lirismo di Peyghambari.

Passando attraverso atmosfere più pensose e sospese, Mood II si trasforma in un pattern rituale simile alla musica di Bärtsch dopo 5 minuti di dialogo tra clarinetto e chitarra sostenuti dagli accordi ripetuti del pianoforte. Infine esplode in una sorta di finale orchestrale attraverso una scala ascendente che liquefa la tensione dell’ascoltatore in una gioia estatica. I Quartet Diminished alternano momenti di improvvisazione a sezioni rigorosamente scritte, spesso esponendole a più livelli: Ogni nostra traccia è il risultato di una procedura diversa, più o meno, a volte estraiamo le idee dalle nostre improvvisazioni e poi le fissiamo scrivendole. In altre occasioni, uno di noi porta un’idea scritta o un suo tema, quindi questa parte scritta si fonde con improvvisazioni, idee individuali e si trasforma in una nuova creazione che appartiene a tutti noi. La traccia Mood I di chiusura è un piccolo capolavoro di estatica chitarra classica, dove potremmo trovare riferimenti in qualche modo nella musica araba che ha influenzato la musica classica spagnola. Il clarinetto si unisce alle incantevoli linee di Sadig in un modo così delicato che, quando entra la voce lirica di Younesi, è quasi impossibile distinguere i tre. Ci stiamo spostando in un luogo paradisiaco in cui vorremmo rimanere il più a lungo possibile.

Stations Two è una dichiarazione di identità di una band che si muove in un territorio sconosciuto mischiando avanguardia, musica rituale, orchestra da camera e persino metal e prog. Non sorprende scoprire che questi musicisti attraggano l’interesse di produttori come Manfred Eicher o Leonardo Pavkovic. Ci trasportano in un rituale moderno, un rituale consapevole e rispettoso del dialogo tra identità multiple, che si fondono idealmente in un’identità nuova.

Quartet Diminished
Station Two

1. Station Two
2. Zone
3. Cluster
4. Mood II
5. Projector
6. Mood I

Ehsan Sadig – chitarra elettrica
Mazyar Younesi – piano, voce
Soheil Peyghambari – clarinetto, clarinetto basso, sax soprano
Rouzbeh Fadavi – batteria

Hermes Records
http://www.hermesrecords.com/en/Ensembles/Diminished

David Kollar/Arve Henriksen – Illusion of a Separate World [Hevhetia 2018]

English version below

Prima stavi parlando del senso della vita, del disinteresse dell’arte. Prendiamo la musica. È l’arte meno connessa […] senza associazioni. Nonostante tutto la musica penetra l’anima! Che cosa risuona in noi in risposta dell’armonia del suono? E lo trasforma in una fonte di grande piacere, che ci unisce e ci scuote? Per quale scopo? E soprattutto per chi? Tu dirai, per niente e per nessuno. Disinteressata. Ma alla fine forse non é così… perché tutto, in fin dei conti, ha un significato. [Stalker, Andrej Tarkovskij 1979]

Due mondi separati che si incontrano, due culture lontane al crocevia di molteplici influenze trovano con facilità disarmante un terreno comune. Una molteplicità di riferimenti fuse nel suono unico di Illusion of a Separate World.  Il chitarrista slovacco David Kollar e il trombettista norvegese Arve Henriksen fondono le loro prospettive in soundscape luminosi, tocchi etnici, ritmi elettronici e riff post-rock. Riescono ad andare dritto al nocciolo delle cose fin dal prima nota, non aggiungono niente che non serva. Ci offrono una musica nuda e mai inutile o disinteressata, ma solo concentrata a rivelare il significato che, come nella citazione di Stalker di Andrej Tarkovskij, é insito in ogni cosa.

Il chitarrista slovacco David Kollar si é guadagnato negli ultimi anni un interesse sempre crescente nel panorama della chitarra sperimentale. Soprattutto grazie alle collaborazioni con il batterista dei King Crimson Pat Mastelotto nel progetto KoMaRa, con il trombettista Paolo Ranieri a completare il trio. E poi soprattutto con l’invito da parte di Steven Wilson prima a suonare su due pezzi del suo ultimo To the Bone e poi ad aprire le date europee con i soundscape alla chitarra. Nei suoi album solisti la chitarra non é necessariamente l’elemento predominante: tutto é proteso ad una musica immaginifica, spontanea. Non a caso alterna al lavoro solista anche la composizione di colonne sonore. Nell’improvvisazione da solo o in gruppi ridotti (duo o trio) usa un armamentario di chitarre autocostruite e di effettistica: una strumentazione parzialmente ortodossa, spesso declinata in sonorità da synth orchestrale, oppure in glitch e rumori percussivi sulle corde tramite gli archetti, oppure ancora in laceranti soli grezzamente distorti. Eivind Aarset, Christian Fennesz e David Torn sono alcuni dei punti di riferimento nella sua musica e é proprio il suono di quest’ultimo ad essere il punto di riferimento maggiore in questo disco.

L’incontro con Arve Henriksen é avvenuto nel 2017 dopo un duo del trombettista con Fennesz. Dice Kollar: ‘Ho suonato lo scorso anno allo Spectaculare festival a Praga. Avevo in programma una performance da solo e dopo di me c’erano Arve e Christian Fennesz. Alla fine del concerto ci siamo scambiati i contatti. Da lì a pochi mesi ci siamo rincontrati sul palco dell’Hevhetia festival in Slovacchia’. Sulla strada del ritorno da quel concerto i due hanno deciso di suonare un album insieme. Nel dicembre del 2017 Kollar ha passato una settimana a Faenza, ospite dell’amico trombettista Paolo Ranieri, con il quale condivide anche il lavoro nel trio The Blessed Beat. Durante la permanenza, ha incominciato a delineare le basi per Illusion of a Separate World. Ha registrato soundscapes, riff, bozze di tracce su base giornaliera, quasi in forma di diario. Il risultato finale sono state 17 tracce, delle quali 12 sarebbero poi state selezionate per le registrazioni aggiuntive di Arve Henriksen.

È difficile immaginare questa collaborazione come il prodotto asincrono in studio piuttosto che una lunga jam dal vivo, tanta é l’initimità che i due dimostrano. L’apertura di Night Navigator, caratterizzata dai dilatati guitar synth di Kollar, é un viaggio attraverso una sovrapposizione di melodie in cui chitarra e tromba si alternano alla guida e rispondono. L’orchestrazione superba degli strati sonori mette in luce sia le doti di compositore di colonne sonore di Kollar, sia la capacità di Henriksen di mimetizzare la sua tromba in qualunque contesto si trovi. L’introduzione lascia lo spazio alla prima traccia vera e propria, Mirror Transformation: un paio di accordi lasciati risuonare col suono in pulito di Kollar fanno da tappeto ad Henriksen. Con il suo tipico suono fluttuante e respirato, imita il flauto ney della musica persiana mentre gioca attorno ad una melodia in dorico. Appena questa si esaurisce, entra un arpeggio discendente. I bassi profondi dell’accordatura abbassata della chitarra, l’andatura che richiama le melodie dell’est europa, eppure una sonorità quasi post-rock, permettono a Kollar di costruire uno scenario ieratico, quasi un rituale sacrificale; Henriksen lo raddoppia con un’inaspettata voce gutturale da musica siberiana.

Ho ascoltato molto Don Cherry e Miles Davis, ma Nils Petter [Molvær] e Jon [Hassell] sono quelli ai quali mi sono ispirato maggiormente. Loro avevano un suono molto personale e io no, ma un giorno Nils mi fece ascoltare lo shakuhachi giapponese, e allora ho capito che quella era la strada che, con la mia tromba, stavo cercando. [Arve Henriksen in Il Suono del Nord, Luca Vitali, Haze]. Arve Henriksen negli ultimi trent’anni ha rivoluzionato lo strumento grazie ad un’impostazione unica, grazie alla scelta di un’intonazione influenzata dagli strumenti a fiato etnici, il tutto filtrato frequenti usi di riverberi, di pitch shifters o distorsori. Alterna la tromba al canto -una voce eterea, quasi da contralto- e all’elettronica -tramite laptop o scatolette da drum machine. Etnica e elettronica, improvvisazione e non: partendo dal rumorismo dei Supersilent, alle esperienze più sperimentali folk con Terje Ingsuset o con il Trio Medieval, le commistioni più elettroniche con Jan Bang o più avant rock con David Sylvian; e infine gli album solisti per Rune Grammofon e ECM, solo per citare le collaborazioni degli ultimi anni. Towards Language del 2017 é un manifesto della poetica minimalista di totale riduzione dello spazio sonoro e melodico iniziata con Chiaroscuro (2004) e ancora prima con Sakuteiki (2001).

Costruire tanto con poco: può sembrare un paradosso confrontare Arve Henriksen non solo con Nils Petter Molvær, ma anche con un musicista così geograficamente e caratterialmente lontano come Miles Davis e la sua capacità di creare così tanto movimento musicale con poche note. La melodia iniziale di Chimera si sposta su tre note. La tromba raddoppiata dal pitch shifter gioca sulle acciaccature per imitare la secchezza di uno shakuhachi, muovendosi su un scoundscape liquido tra modo dorico ed eolico. Quando dopo 3 minuti e mezzo la chitarra emerge più distinta, entra anche un ritmo elettronico tribale insieme ad una chitarra ritmica afrobeat. Il successivo solo di Henriksen esplode in una massa lirica di riverberi, un inno potente e trascinante che ci guida, come se dall’alto di una montagna guardassimo di sotto. Dal punto di vista musicale- non avviene niente di più di ciò che debba avvenire.

Entrambi si spostano con facilità negli spazi dell’altro come fossero i loro. Quando in Solarization Kollar passa da una serie di accordi aperti ad un battito sulle corde basse della chitarra, Henriksen risponde con familiarità innescando una melodia quasi balcanica. L’interplay tra i due crea ancora una volta uno scenario di tensione, che raggiunge il picco quando la tromba viene filtrata attraverso un synth. A questo la chitarra risponde con glitch quasi percettibili. La tenue Castles in the Air offre uno dei soli più ispirati mai ascoltati dalla tromba di Henriksen. David Kollar é in disparte, stavolta più sulle note basse mentre la tromba si libra lirica e drammatica, intensa in ogni passaggio, fino alla lacerante chiusura della chitarra.

I potenti muri di accordi iniziali di Roving Observer, come indica Kollar, sono stati ispirati da Stalker di Andrei Tarkovskij, regista per il quale il chitarrista nutre un amore particolare. Le inquietanti atmosfere del compositore Eduard Artemev ricorrono in questo soundscape. Sembrano spuntare ad ogni angolo i rumori di Helge Sten ed i violenti accordi di Ståle Storløkken: Arve Henriksen non può che sentirsi a casa, mentre aggiunge le sue linee di tromba laceranti ed atonali. La chiusura é affidata ad un inno, quasi un accompagnamento per i titoli di coda di un ipotetico film. La melodia di Beyond the iCloud ascende quasi come un volo sopra la scena conclusiva di un film, come un drone che riprende da lontano la conclusione della vicenda. Il solo di chitarra si distingue per semplicità con un suono quasi frippiano, giocato su pochi bending e su molto riverbero. Infine, la melodia iniziale ritorna e si dissolve piano piano, prima dei titoli di coda.

Intimo, ma intenso; drammatico e sottile allo stesso tempo. Illusion of a Separate World è l’incontro tra due artisti che mostrano quanto è facile -per loro- creare musica immediata e complessa, inquientante e magnifica allo stesso tempo.

Illusion of a Separate World
David Kollar chitarra elettrica, electronics
Arve Henriksen tromba, voce, batteria, tastiere ed electronics

1. Night navigator
2. Mirror transformations
3. Silk spinning
4. Chimera
5. The spiral turn
6. Solarization
7. Vision of light
8. Castles in the air
9. Bird of passage
10. Augmented reality
11. Roving observer
12. Beyond the iCloud

Hevhetia Records

English version

You were talking recently about the meaning of our life, the unselfishness of art. Let’s take music, it’s really least of all connected […] Nonetheless the music miraculously penetrates into the very soul! What is resonating in us in answer to the harmonized noise? And turns it for us into the source of great delight. And unites us, and shakes us? What is its purpose? And, above all, for whom? You will say: for nothing, and for nobody, just so. Unselfish. Though it’s not so perhaps… For everything, in the end, has its own meaning. [Stalker, Andrej Tarkovskij 1979]

Two separate worlds meet, two distant cultures cross their multiple influences finding a common ground with unexpected easiness. Several references merge into the unique sound of Illusion of a Separate World. Slovakian guitarist David Kollar and Norwegian trumper Arve Henriksen blend their playing into shimmering soundscapes, ethnic influences, electronic rhythms and post-rock riffs. They manage to go straight to the core of things since the initial notes, never adding anything more than what’s needed. Not making any useless or unselfish music, they are always focused only on unleashing the hidden meaning that everything has, quoting Stalker by Andrei Tarkovsky.

Slovakian guitarist David Kollar earned an increasing interest in the avant guitar scene in recent times. Thanks to collaborations with King Crimson drummer Pat Mastelotto in KoMaRa project, along with trumpeter Paolo Ranieri as third member. And also thanks to the invite by Steven Wilson to play on two pieces of his latest To the Bone and to stand as opening act as solo soundscape guitar for his European leg. He does not play guitar only on his solo albums: every device might be a mean to contribute to an imaginative, spontaneous music. It is no coincidence that he alternates his guitar duties together with soundtrack composition. Improvising alone or in small groups (duo or trio), Kollar uses self-made guitar and complex pedalboard: an orthodox setup declined in an unorthodox manner in orchestral synth sounds, or in glitches and percussive noises made on the strings through bows, or still in roughly distorted lead guitars. Eivind Aarset, Christian Fennesz and David Torn are playing a reference role while listening to his music and it is the sound of the latter to be the main influence in this album.

David Kollar met Arve Henriksen in 2017 after a duo between the trumpeter with Fennesz. Kollar says: ‘I played last year on Spectacularefestival in Prague. I had a solo performance billed and after me there was Arve playing with Christian Fennesz. At the end of the festival we shared our emails and phone numbers. In few months we met again on the stage at Hevhetia festival in Slovakia‘. On the drive back home from the gig the two decided to record an album. In December 2017 Kollar spent a week in Faenza, Italy, host of the trumpeter and fellow friend Paolo Ranieri, with whom he also shares the duties in The Blessed Beat trio. During the stay, he begun to outline the tracks for Illusion of a Separate World. He recorded soundscapes, riffs, sketches of tracks on a daily basis, almost in the form of a personal diary. This final resulted in 17 tracks, of which 12 would have been selected for the recordings of Arve Henriksen‘s trumpet and eletronics.

The both of them show such an intimacy that it is difficult to conceive this collaboration as a product of two separate worlds in studio rather than a joint live setting. Night Navigator opens with Kollar playing broadened guitar synth carpets. We are in a journey through multiple layers of melodies in which guitar and trumpet alternatively take and release the lead. The superb orchestration of the sound layers highlights both Kollar‘s skills as soundtrack composer as well as the mastery of Henriksen in camouflaging his trumpet in whatever context it is. The introduction paves the road to  Mirror Transformation: the clean guitar plays a couple of strummed chords, which are left resonating as a carpet for Henriksen‘s. With his typical fluctuating and breathing sound, he imitates the Persian ney flute, while playing a dorian melody. As soon as this is running out, a descending arpeggio enters in. The deep basses of the lowered guitar tuning, the pace recalling a Eastern Europe melody, and yet an almost post-rock sound, all these things allow Kollar to build a hieratic scenario, almost a sacrifice ritual; Henriksen doubles it with an unexpected guttural voice inspired by Siberian music.

‘I’ve heard a lot of Don Cherry and Miles Davis, but Nils Petter [Molvær] and Jon [Hassell] are the ones I’ve been most inspired by. They had a very personal sound and I did not, but one day Nils made me listen to the Japanese shakuhachi, and then I realized that this was the road that, with my trumpet, I was looking for. [Arve Henriksen in The Sound of the North, Luca Vitali, backtranslated from Italian]. In the last thirty years Arve Henriksen transformed the instrument thanks to his unique technique and to the choice of an intonation influenced by ethnic wind instruments filtered through reverbs, pitch shifters or distortions. He alternates trumpet playing to singing – an ethereal, almost contralto voice- and to the electronics -laptops and drum machine boxes. Ethnic and electronic, improvisation in jazz and outside: starting from the noise improvised outfits of Supersilent, to the more experimental folk experiences with Terje Ingsuset or with Trio Medieval, then duos with Jan Bang or with David Sylvian, just to mention the collaborations in the latest years. Not to forget the solo career with Rune Grammofon and ECM: 2017’s release Towards Language was a manifesto of the same minimalist poetic of total reduction of sound and melodic space that started with Chiaroscuro (2004) and earlier with Sakuteiki (2001).

Creating so much with so few: comparing Arve Henriksen not only with Nils Petter Molvær, but also with a musicist so geographically and far away such as Miles Davis may seem a paradox. But there’s a lot in common with his ability to create so much musical movement with just a few notes. The intro melody of Chimera moves on three notes. Trumpet is doubled by pitch shifter and plays on microtonal inflections to imitate japanese shakuhachi’s dry sound, while moving over a liquid scoundscape and jumping between dorian and aeolian mode. When guitar emerges more distinctly after 3 minutes and a half, also a tribal rhythm enters in, joint by an almost Afrobeat rhythm guitar. The following solo by Henriksen explodes in a lyrical mass of reverberations, a powerful and enthralling hymn that guides us as if we were on the top of a mountain. It does not happen – from the musical point of view – nothing more than what has to happen.

Both move easily in the spaces of the other as if they were theirs. When Kollar switches from a series of open chords to a plucking on the low strings of the guitar in Solarization, then Henriksen answers with intimacy launching a Balkan melody. The interplay between the two creates once again a tension, which reaches its peak when the trumpet is filtered through a synth. Guitar answers with almost perceptible glitches. Faint Castles in the Air offers one of the most inspired solos ever played by Henriksen. David Kollar sits on the back this time, more concentrated on the low end of the spectrum, while the trumpet takes off in lyrical and dramatic matter. He increases the intensity at every single note, until the tearful closure by the guitar.

The anxious wall of chords in Roving Observer, as Kollar indicates, were inspired by Andrei Tarkovskij‘s Stalker, a director the guitarist nurtures a special love for. The disturbing atmospheres of the composer Eduard Artemev recur in this soundscape. It is like Helge Sten is adding his noises and Ståle Storløkken is playing his violent eletric piano chords: Arve Henriksen feels at ease while he adds his piercing and atonal trumpet melodies here. Album’s closure is a sort of hymn, almost an accompaniment for the ending credits of a hypothetical film. Beyond the iCloud is built around a melody that ascends like a flight over the final scene of a film, like a drone that films the story progressively from afar. The guitar solo avoids any redundancy of notes, an almost Fripp-like sound, played on a few bendings and with much reverb. Eventually the initial melody returns and fades out slowly, before the credits.

Intimate, but still intense, passionate and subtle at same time. Illusion of a Separate World is two artists showing how easy is for them to create music that is immediate and tremendously complex, haunting and gorgeous at same time.

Illusion of a Separate World
David Kollar electric guitar, electronics
Arve Henriksen trumpet, vocal, drums, keyboards and electronics

1. Night navigator
2. Mirror transformations
3. Silk spinning
4. Chimera
5. The spiral turn
6. Solarization
7. Vision of light
8. Castles in the air
9. Bird of passage
10. Augmented reality
11. Roving observer
12. Beyond the iCloud

Hevhetia Records