Quartet Diminished – Station Two [Hermes Records 2018]

Review + short interview with Ehsan Sadig

Italian version below

My goal was to form a band with musicians with different backgrounds and tastes. As a guitar player progressive and metal music have influenced me most. Our drummer, Rouzbeh Fadavi, comes from more jazzy background, our pianist, Mazyar Younesi, is graduated in classical music and also a conductor, and our woodwind player, Soheil Peyghambari, has more folk music background. Ehsan Sadigh, guitarist and one of the founders of Teheran based Quartet Diminished, points very clearly in his words at what were his purposes since the start of his band. Different identities collide in four different people’ backgrounds, western and eastern cultures clash, electric clashes with acoustic, Iranian classical clashes with western jazz and metal. Quartet Diminished is first and foremost a battle scene, where notes, modes, rhythms bring their history in and meet.

But wouldn’t this mix of influences risk to fall into chaos? Musicologist Carl Dalhaus once told that we should not talk about ‘identities’ in music, better to use the word ‘Wesen‘. The translation of this german term might be ‘being’, or better ‘consciousness of being’. When human beings are born, they gradually start creating their consciousness by difference: I am not the world outside [Marcello Sorce Keller Identities in traditional and western musics in Enciclopedia della Musica, Il Sole 24 Ore]. An identity is built upon a difference with other identities. This approach applied to music hints at how every culture might be seen as a separate from another. In the speed of light collapsing universe of today’s music cultures, bringing together the more distant sounds is becoming the rule. And the result is often a chaos producing system of multiple influences blended together. But is mixing cultures creating a new identity or is it just a plain juxtapositions of sounds? From my point of view as listener, I appreciate when the culture clashing process creates new identities. If you are looking for this option as well, then put Quartet Diminished on the top of your wishlist.

Take the sixteen minutes of Cluster, third track of their 2018 effort Station Two. While the length might surely appeal progressive rock fans, this is not exactly a typical ‘prog epic’, nor a classical suite. But something that fits in the middle. The slightly disturbing repetitions of piano intro’s power chords pave the road for the drums and guitar’ grandeur metal entry. Piano and bass clarinet answers back each distorted chord, but there’s not time left to start the headbanging. A sudden interruption places the piano back in. Younesi initiates a rubato dialogue with Peyghambari‘s saxophone with a sort of dorian mode feeling. An unison cascading line played by piano and guitar falls at the moment when the bass clarinet and drums may start back the sound and fury.

These frequent start and stops are the core of Quartet Diminished‘s music, thanks to the unique approach of the only single rhythmic element of the band, the drummer Rouzbeh Fadavi. A disquieting sense of disruption of our concept of the uninterrupted standard western song. If we take the perspective of traditional Iranian classical music and the music system of the avaz, which is based on the sequences of different moods and modes -to roughly translate that, then this structure seems no wonder. Ehsan Sadig offers his point of view on the traditional Iranian music: The influence of Iranian rhythms and melodies has precipitated in our subconscious somehow. Therefore, we don’t use them deliberately in many occasions, they just penetrate in our music in a subtle way. Coming back to the point of Cluster we left off, the rhythmic section in 3+3+3+2 first explodes vigorously, then placidly moves back to intro theme, while Ehsan Sadig plays shrilling bendings over a phrygian traditional scale. Suddenly piano’s descending rumblings move the atmosphere to a rondo-style -with the absence of the drums- that morphs in an intricate 5+3+4 jazz-rock rhythmic section. When the drum enters again in, Peyghambari is left the space to fill with his intense and prolonged folk echoes. If we ever looked for a definition of Cluster, then this might be: a chamber electro-acoustic suite played by traditionally influenced progressive musicians [!]. 

Quartet Diminished are now approaching their second release, but their roots are in the initial line-up for the release as trio earlier in 2013. As Ehsan Sadig tells me: Our first band was called ‘Whisper’, including drums (Rouzbeh), Guitar (Me) and bass (Nima). When the bass player left the band, I decided to replace it with saxophone (Parviz). Diminished was the name of my first released album. Ending up being released under the name of Ehsan Sadig Trio, Diminished is a distinctive sound album: traditional music played in a ritual-like context. Instruments alternate often in solo or duos throughout the release, the rests are frequently taking the scene more than the music itself. A subtle sense of tension pervades this work, while guitar is not necessarily playing always and everywhere. With the entrance of new members, the project slightly changed its sound: Mazyar Younesi (pianist and conductor) joined the band shortly after Parviz (sax player) left the band, so I decided to make a new quartet band. Then Peter Soleimanipour joined the quartet as woodwind player and the first album of quartet diminished (Station One) got released. Published by Hermes records in 2015, Station One is an intricate rhythms shift and a leap forward in their music making. While polyrhythmic layers blink at postminimal european bands such as Nik Bärtsch, the sounds are taking nourishment from multiple sources at once, thanks also to the decision to make their project unique with no bass instrument. Traditional music, classical, jazz: Station One is taking the roads of unexpectedness. After Peter left the quartet, Soheil Peyghambari joined us as our new woodwind player about 2 years ago and with the new lineup the second album of Quartet Diminished (Station Two)

The eponymous track opening Station Two is already a showcase of how these multiple sources of influence may collide and meet. After Ehsan Sadig‘s scratching on guitar strings collapses in all-band avant-like noise, then the guitarist creates a groove with a simple hypnotic repetition of a single note. The tap-your-feet pattern that follows is enriched by Soheil Peyghambari‘s deep bass clarinet, that is easy to compare to the rhythmic efforts by swiss Sha. And then it breaks in a stopping tension opening for piano solo: slowly built around jazz and traditional music atmospheres, it moves in a similar direction to what others, such like Tigran Hamasyan, are doing by mixing western and eastern traditions in the contemporary context. The grand finale with its long and aggressive notes repeated by whole band,comes again after a pause. Tension and sudden rests: those are the rules in Quartet Diminished music. They are always looking at managing the tension of the track in some way in between traditional ritual and western avantgarde music. Ehsan puts it in very easy manner: Iranian folk music is one of our influences since the Iranian ritual music is a branch of Iranian folk music more or less, and we’ve heard those melodies and ballads from our early childhood via media and etc..

The following track, Zone, has even more metal chamber moments for Ehsan Sadig to show his wide array of techniques. Ranging from palm muted to power chord, tapping and sweep picking arpeggios, his efforts are never appearing as effortless virtuoso exhibitionism. The initial drum rolling -which incidentally Sadig indicates as having been inspired by a kurdish rhythm- works as the preparation for the subsequent polyrhythmic layering between piano playing in a 12 on 4 feeling and guitar following a 3+4+3+4+3+4 pattern. Quartet Diminished are frequently working with slow intertwining tempos, which seems to let more easily explode the thrilling solos by Sadig on guitar or the folk embellished lyrical melodies by Peyghambari

Moving through more pensive atmospheres, Mood II morphs in a Bärtsch-like ritual pattern after 5 minutes of dialogue between clarinet and guitar sustained by piano’s repeated chords. Then eventually explodes in a sort of orchestral finale via an ascending scale that liquefies the listener’s tension in a peaceful joy. Quartet Diminished alternates moments of improvisation to strictly written materials, often exposing it to multiple layers: Each track of ours is a result of a different procedure more or less, sometimes we extract the ideas from our improvises and then fix them by writing them. In other occasion, one of us might bring a written idea or phrase of his, then this written part will blend with improvises, individual ideas and transforms to a new creation which belongs to all of us. The closing Mood I is an ecstatic classical guitar work of art, we might find references someway in the Arabian music that influenced Spanish classical music. Clarinet is joining Sadig‘s delightful tunes in such a delicate manner that, when Younesi‘s lyrical voice enters in, it is almost impossible to distinguish each of them. They are moving us to an heavenly place we would like to sit in for the longest time possible.

Stations Two is a statement of identity from a band that moves in a unforeseen territory crossing avantgarde, ritual music, chamber orchestra and even metal and prog. Not a surprise that these guys are attracting the interest of so many fine producers such as Manfred Eicher or Leonardo Pavkovic. They are moving us in a modern ritual, a conscious and respectful ritual of the dialogue between multiple identities, that look at melting in a new identity.

Quartet Diminished
Station Two

1. Station Two
2. Zone
3. Cluster
4. Mood II
5. Projector
6. Mood I

Ehsan Sadig – electric guitar
Mazyar Younesi – piano, voice
Soheil Peyghambari – clarinet, bass clarinet, soprano saxophone
Rouzbeh Fadavi – drums

Hermes Records
http://www.hermesrecords.com/en/Ensembles/Diminished

Versione in italiano

Il mio obiettivo era formare una band con musicisti con background e gusti diversi. Come chitarrista, il progressive e la musica metal mi hanno influenzato di più. Il nostro batterista, Rouzbeh Fadavi, proviene da un ambiente più jazzistico, il nostro pianista, Mazyar Younesi, ha un diploma in musica classica ed è anche direttore d’orchestra, e il nostro fiatista, Soheil Peyghambari, viene da esperienze con la musica folk. Ehsan Sadigh, chitarrista e uno dei fondatori della band di Teheran Quartet Diminished, sottolinea molto chiaramente nelle sue parole cosa stava cercando sin dalla fondazione della sua band. Identità diverse si scontrano in quattro contesti diversi, si scontrano culture occidentali e orientali, l’elettrico che si scontra con l’acustico, musica classica iraniana con il jazz e il metal occidentali. Quartet Diminished è prima di tutto una battaglia, in cui note, modi, ritmi portano la loro storia e si incontrano.

Ma tutto questo incrocio di influenze non rischia di finire nel caos? Il musicologo Carl Dalhaus una volta disse che non dovevamo parlare di “identità” nella musica, ma era meglio usare la parola “Wesen“. La traduzione di questo termine tedesco potrebbe essere “essere”, o meglio “coscienza dell’essere”. Quando gli esseri umani nascono, gradualmente iniziano a creare la loro coscienza attraverso la differenziazione: io non sono il mondo esterno [Marcello Sorce Keller Identità nelle musiche tradizionali ed occidentali in Enciclopedia della Musica, Il Sole 24 Ore]. Un’identità si basa su una differenza con altre identità. Questo approccio applicato alla musica indica perché é possibile parlare di una cultura differenziata da un’altra. Nell’universo delle culture musicali di oggi, che collassano alla velocità della luce, riunire le sonorità più distanti da un punto di vista geografico o sociale sta diventando la regola. E il risultato è spesso un sistema che produce un caos di molteplici influenze mescolate insieme. Ma mescolare le culture significa creare una nuova identità o è solo una giusta giustapposizione di suoni? Dal mio punto di vista di ascoltatore, amo quando il processo di contrasto culturale crea nuove identità. Se é questo che state cercando, allora mettete i Quartet Diminished in cima alla vostra lista.

Prendiamo i sedici minuti di Cluster, terza traccia da Station Two del 2018. La lunghezza potrebbe sicuramente attrarre i fan del progressive rock, ma questa non è esattamente un prog epic, e neanche una suite da musica classica. Ma qualcosa che sta nel mezzo. Le ripetizioni inquietanti dei power chords di piano lasciano spazio all’intro di batteria e chitarra dal sapore di grandeur metal. Il clarinetto basso ed il pianoforte rispondono a ogni accordo distorto, ma non c’é tempo per iniziare l’headbanging. Un’improvvisa interruzione dà spazio improvvisamente al pianoforte. Younesi avvia un dialogo in rubato con il sassofono di Peyghambari ed i due galleggiano attorno al modo dorico. Una linea all’unisono tra piano e chitarra discende a cascata nel momento in cui il clarinetto basso e la batteria ricominciano a battere ad un ritmo infernale.

Queste frequenti pause e ripartenze sono il cuore della musica dei Quartet Diminished, grazie all’approccio unico del solo elemento ritmico della band, il batterista Rouzbeh Fadavi. Avvertiamo un inquietante senso di rottura del nostro concetto della canzone occidentale standard, abituati come siamo allo sviluppo ininterrotto del pezzo. Se consideriamo, invece, la prospettiva della musica classica iraniana classica e del sistema musicale dell’avaz, che si basa sulle sequenze di diversi stati d’animo e modi -per tradurre questo concetto in maniera veramente approssimativa, allora questa struttura non sembra sorprendente. Ehsan Sadig offre il suo punto di vista sulla musica tradizionale iraniana: L’influenza dei ritmi e delle melodie iraniani è in qualche modo precipitata nel nostro subconscio. Quindi, non li usiamo deliberatamente in molte occasioni, semplicemente penetrano nella nostra musica in modo sottile. Ritornando al punto di Cluster dove avevamo interrotto, una sezione ritmica in tempi composti da 3 + 3 + 3 + 2 esplode vigorosamente, poi torna placidamente al tema di introduzione, mentre Ehsan Sadig emette alcuni bending lancinanti su una scala tradizionale frigia. All’improvviso i turbinii discendenti del pianoforte spostano l’atmosfera verso uno stile rondò, con l’assenza della batteria, che si trasforma in una intricata sezione ritmica jazz-rock in tempi di 5 + 3 + 4. Quando la batteria entra di nuovo, a Peyghambari è lasciato uno spazio che può riempire con i suoi echi folk intensi e prolungati. Se mai avessimo cercato una definizione di Cluster, potrebbe essere: una suite elettroacustica da camera suonata da musicisti progressive influenzati dalla musica tradizionale [!].

I Quartet Diminished sono al loro secondo album, ma le loro radici risalgono alla line-up iniziale che all’inizio del 2013 ha pubblicato un disco precedente sotto diverso nome. Come Ehsan Sadig mi dice: Il nostro primo gruppo si chiamava “Whisper”, ed includeva  batteria (Rouzbeh), chitarra (Me) e basso (Nima). Quando il bassista ha lasciato la band ho deciso di sostituirlo con il sassofono (Parviz). Diminished era il nome del mio primo album pubblicato. Pubblicato, infine, con il nome di Ehsan Sadig Trio, Diminished è un album dal suono distinto ed unico: la musica tradizionale eseguita in un contesto da rituale. Gli strumenti si alternano in solo o in duetto, le pause spesso prendono la scena più della musica stessa. Un sottile senso di tensione pervade questo lavoro, mentre la chitarra non é necessariamente presente sempre e ovunque. Con l’ingresso di nuovi membri, il progetto ha leggermente modificato le sue sonorità: Mazyar Younesi (pianista e direttore d’orchestra) si è unito alla band poco dopo che Parviz (sassofonista) ha lasciato la band, così ho deciso di creare una nuova band in quartetto. Quindi Peter Soleimanipour si é unito al gruppo come fiatista e il primo album del Quartet Diminished (Station One) é stato pubblicato. Prodotto da Hermes Records nel 2015, Station One è un intricato cambio di ritmi e un salto in avanti nella loro produzione musicale. Mentre i livelli poliritmici fanno l’occhiolino ad artisti postminimali europei come Nik Bärtsch, le sonorità si nutrono da più fonti contemporaneamente, grazie anche all’unicità del suono della sezione ritmica priva di basso. Musica tradizionale, classica, jazz: Station One percorre strade imprevedibili. Dopo che Peter lasciò il quartetto, Soheil Peyghambari si unì a noi come nostro nuovo fiatista circa 2 anni fa e con la nuova formazione abbiamo prodotto il secondo album di Quartet Diminished (Station Two).

La traccia omonima che apre Station Two è già una vetrina di come queste molteplici influenze possano scontrarsi e incontrarsi. Dopo che Ehsan Sadig graffia il plettro sulle corde della chitarra, tutto crolla in un rumoristico avantgarde di tutta la band ed il chitarrista crea un groove con una semplice ripetizione ipnotica di una singola nota. Il pattern cadenzato che segue è arricchito dal profondo clarinetto basso di Soheil Peyghambari, che è facile confrontare l’arte ritmica dello svizzero Sha. E poi il pezzo si interrompe in un’apertura di tensione per favorire l’assolo di piano: costruito lentamente tra jazz e atmosfere di musica tradizionale, il solo si muove in una direzione simile a quella che altri, come Tigran Hamasyan, stanno facendo mescolando tradizioni occidentali e orientali nel contesto contemporaneo. Il gran finale con le sue note lunghe e aggressive ripetute da tutta la band, arriva di nuovo dopo una pausa. Tensione e pause improvvise: quelle sono le regole della musica dei Quartet Diminished. Provano sempre a gestire la tensione della traccia in qualche modo tra musica tradizionale rituale e avanguardia occidentale. Ehsan lo indica in modo molto semplice: La musica folk iraniana è una delle nostre influenze dal momento che la musica rituale iraniana è un ramo della musica popolare iraniana più o meno, e abbiamo ascoltato quelle melodie e ballate della nostra prima infanzia tramite media ed ecc..

La traccia seguente, Zone, ha ancora più momenti da metal cameristico, che permettono ad Ehsan Sadig di mostrare la sua vasta gamma di tecniche. Dal palm muting ai power chords, tapping ed arpeggi in sweep, le sue esplosioni non appaiono mai come esibizioni di virtuosismo fini a loro stesse. L’iniziale pattern della batteria – che per inciso Sadig indica essere stata ispirata da un ritmo curdo- fa da preparazione per la successiva stratificazione poliritmica tra il piano che suona in un 12/4 e la chitarra che segue con i tempi in 3 + 4 + 3 + 4 + 3 + 4. I Quartet Diminished frequentemente lavorano con tempi che si intrecciano lentamente, che sembra far esplodere più facilmente gli assoli elettrizzanti di Sadig alla chitarra o le melodie impreziosite di lirismo di Peyghambari.

Passando attraverso atmosfere più pensose e sospese, Mood II si trasforma in un pattern rituale simile alla musica di Bärtsch dopo 5 minuti di dialogo tra clarinetto e chitarra sostenuti dagli accordi ripetuti del pianoforte. Infine esplode in una sorta di finale orchestrale attraverso una scala ascendente che liquefa la tensione dell’ascoltatore in una gioia estatica. I Quartet Diminished alternano momenti di improvvisazione a sezioni rigorosamente scritte, spesso esponendole a più livelli: Ogni nostra traccia è il risultato di una procedura diversa, più o meno, a volte estraiamo le idee dalle nostre improvvisazioni e poi le fissiamo scrivendole. In altre occasioni, uno di noi porta un’idea scritta o un suo tema, quindi questa parte scritta si fonde con improvvisazioni, idee individuali e si trasforma in una nuova creazione che appartiene a tutti noi. La traccia Mood I di chiusura è un piccolo capolavoro di estatica chitarra classica, dove potremmo trovare riferimenti in qualche modo nella musica araba che ha influenzato la musica classica spagnola. Il clarinetto si unisce alle incantevoli linee di Sadig in un modo così delicato che, quando entra la voce lirica di Younesi, è quasi impossibile distinguere i tre. Ci stiamo spostando in un luogo paradisiaco in cui vorremmo rimanere il più a lungo possibile.

Stations Two è una dichiarazione di identità di una band che si muove in un territorio sconosciuto mischiando avanguardia, musica rituale, orchestra da camera e persino metal e prog. Non sorprende scoprire che questi musicisti attraggano l’interesse di produttori come Manfred Eicher o Leonardo Pavkovic. Ci trasportano in un rituale moderno, un rituale consapevole e rispettoso del dialogo tra identità multiple, che si fondono idealmente in un’identità nuova.

Quartet Diminished
Station Two

1. Station Two
2. Zone
3. Cluster
4. Mood II
5. Projector
6. Mood I

Ehsan Sadig – chitarra elettrica
Mazyar Younesi – piano, voce
Soheil Peyghambari – clarinetto, clarinetto basso, sax soprano
Rouzbeh Fadavi – batteria

Hermes Records
http://www.hermesrecords.com/en/Ensembles/Diminished

Annunci

The Outsider. Marco Machera – Small Music from Broken Windows [2017]

English version below

Intervista ed ascolto dell’album con Marco Machera, Aprile 2018. 

Cosa si può dire per spiegare la figura dell’Outsider? -si chiedeva nel 1956 Colin Wilson nel libro che gli avrebbe dato la fama, intitolato appunto L’Outsider [ed. Atlantide]. Un libro a cavallo tra romanzo e saggio, tra sociologia e letteratura che é andato ad investigare la figura di chi sta fuori la società. Una delle possibili risposte alla domanda é: ciò che caratterizza l’Outsider é un senso di stranezza, di irrealtà. Vede la realtà in maniera divergente; anzi vede una realtà diversa, ricrea mentalmente una realtà parallela. C’é un punto in comune tra questo passaggio ed un racconto dallo stesso titolo (anche se tradotto in italiano come L’estraneo) di H.P. Lovecraft: nonostante Colin Wilson non fosse un amante del maestro dell’orrore, nel racconto ricorre il tema del mondo parallelo sovrapposto a quello normale, immaginato e visto dagli occhi dell’outsider. Attraverso la storia [SPOILER alert] di un mostro raccontata in prima persona, viviamo da dentro lo sguardo di chi é al di fuori. Anzi, quando realizziamo che il mostro siamo noi, ci appropriamo della sua percezione distorta della realtà. Siamo calati in un mondo e lo vediamo attraverso queste lenti.

In Small Music from Broken Windows Marco Machera, bassista, cantante e compositore, ricrea un mondo parallelo e ce lo fa vedere attraverso gli occhi dell’Outsider. E’ il terzo album solista dopo One Time, Somewhere uscito nel 2012 e Dime Novels del 2014 e segna una discontinuità con i precedenti. Nei primi due erano evidenti le influenze marcate art-rock –Beatles, King Crimson, new wave. Con Small Music from Broken Windows assistiamo ad un cambiamento di linea: un concept di undici brani legati insieme da atmosfere cupe, blues sanguigni, venati di psichedelìa contemporanea e costruiti attorno al nucleo forte di una storia. Di fatto un racconto, la costruzione di un mondo parallelo: non musica caratterizzata da una qualità cinematica -usando un aggettivo spesso appiccicato alla musica come tappeto sonoro- ma musica che ripropone un effetto cinematografico, quasi stessimo vedendo attraverso la macchina da presa di un regista che continuamente si sposta attraverso le scene. Ed il racconto su cui si basa il concept é L’Outsider di Lovecraft: la storia non viene trasposta in maniera didascalica, magari riportando l’azione o i versi all’interno dei brani, ma tradotta in atmosfere cinematografiche, in un’aura di inquietudine. Rimangono i titoli dei pezzi a fare da ponte tra il racconto e l’album.

E’ un mondo parallelo irreale nel quale ci immergiamo. C’è una linea narrativa che si può seguire, però ovviamente, per via anche della qualità della musica, mi é piaciuto mantenere questo effetto onirico, astratto, per cui non é sempre chiaro di cosa si stia parlando, dove ci si trovi -come racconta Marco Machera durante l’intervista. Il disco é nato da macerie personali, momenti belli e meno belli messi insieme. Quello che avevo in mente non era fare un trasferimento letterale della storia di Lovecraft messo in musica e basta. Volevo adattare concetti della storia al mio vissuto. Mi piace che l’idea sia quella ed ognuno la può interpretare.

L’attacco di The Glimpse, solo chitarra e voce senza riverbero, mima un crooning delicato ed intimo: una breve cadenza in II-V-I, un tocco blues sviluppati in un giro brevissimo a trasportarci lentamente nel mood dell’album, come fosse l’introduzione del romanzo. The Glimpse era all’origine una demo; volevo espanderla, ma poi dopo mi é piaciuta così, chitarra e voce senza riverbero -volevo un disco senza riverberi. Ho aggiunto solo dei piccoli samples sotto. E’ solo un antipasto alle atmsfere da blues sanguigno, verace, di The Labyrinth of Nighted Silence. Una lap steel guitar, un’armonica a ricreare un’atmosfera che potrebbe uscire da una puntata di True Detective e dalla musica di T Bone Burnett. Tom Waits, però, é il riferimento primario per questo scurissimo blues, che ha il suo punto culminante nell’assolo storto e deviato di Cabeki, nome d’arte del versonese Andrea Faccioli. Avevo in testa per questo disco di fare un blues moderno, rivisitato. All’inizio era ancora più convenzionale con la chitarra a tenere il tempo. L’ho svuotato: é rimasto il piede, l’armonica ed il synth che si sente sotto. Poi ho aggiunto la chitarra con il tremolo per dare questa sensazione notturna. Nella versione che sta portando dal vivo con una line-up parzialmente differente da quella dell’album, Labyrinth of Nighted Silence acquista una potenza evocativa, un viaggio onirico vivido e psichedelico. Attraverso le tastiere di Eugene, la chitarra del collaboratore di lunga data Enzo Ferlazzo e del compagno di avventura con la band EchoTest Alessandro Inolti, Marco Machera aggiunge strati di significato ai pezzi, ne aumenta il coefficiente di oniricità se possibile nel contesto live.

Per un musicista dal background progressive può risultare drammaticamente difficile comporre un pezzo con pochi accordi. Lo racconta bene Daniel Gildenlow della band prog metal svedese Pain of Salvation quando, dopo che la loro Ashes venne eletta come canzone dell’anno dagli utenti di una nota webzine prog nel 2000, rivelò con atteggiamento di sfida ai fan prog che era composta da soli tre accordi (!). Ma si può fare ancora di più: Frantic é costruita su un accordo per la strofa ed un altro per il ritornello: l’effetto della tastiera di Francesco Zampi, che rimane per interminabili secondi sullo stesso accordo nel chorus, é straniante all’ascolto. Il riff di banjo in loop dall’intro in poi é, però, il protagonista. Una cosa curiosa é che anche questa traccia di banjo era solo una take da fermare. Però mi piaceva. Il problema era che il banjo era scordato. Quindi ho dovuto riaccordare tutto al banjo, ad esempio il basso era scordatissimo. Quando abbiamo dovuto provare live i musicisti mi hanno chiesto che accordatura fosse (risata). La linea di basso dell’accompagnamento si muove in slide con chiaro riferimento a Tony Levin. Non é un caso visto che Marco ha avuto modo di conoscere e suonare con Levin, oltre che con Adrian Belew e Pat Mastelotto dopo averli incontrati al Three of a Perfect Pair camp. In realtà -racconta Marco- è una chitarra suonata con l’octaver doppiato con il basso vero, per dargli più spessore, un octaver dell’Eventide. Il suono, comunque, era troppo poco spinto sulle basse; ho duplicato la traccia e portata un’ottava giù. Sembra quasi che suoni in fretless, ma in realtà é una chitarra che si muove su una sola corda. Trasportato un’ottava sotto ha datto la grana particolare al suono.

Small Music from Broken Windows ha avuto una gestazione lunga per un album composto fatto di immediatezza e di pezzi brevi -un solo pezzo sopra i 5 minuti, quasi tutti sotto i 4. Ho iniziato a scriverlo dopo l’uscita di Dime Novels, quindi addirittura fine 2013 e tutto 2014 e 2015. Poi é rimasto fermo. Poteva già uscire nel 2016. Però poi ovviamente, aspettando, ho avuto modo di perfezionare, affinare come volevo, come lo avevo in testa. E’ il il primo disco che riesco ad ascoltare senza aver voglia di apportare modifiche. Con Dime Novels ho talmente rincorso la mia idea di perfezione per i suoni che avevo in testa, per gli arrangiamenti che poi alla fine mi sono ritrovato che non avevo più il senso finale del disco. Anche per Small Music from Broken Windows ho cercato il perfezionismo, ma ho trovato più facilmente la quadra. Ero contento, mi sono fermato e sono stato contento di essermi fermato. Adesso riascolto il disco e dico é tutto al suo posto. 

Tutto l’album predilige più il senso di atmosfera che di complessità della scrittura; cosa che magari lo distanzia dalla cerebralità del prog classico, ma lo avvicina al sound del new prog dell’etichetta Kscope, pensando ad esempio ai No-Man, a Steven Wilson, a Tim Bowness. The Tower é il primo interludio strumentale, costruito attorno ad un giro di chitarra ed una breve linea della melodica di Gionata Forciniti. Un piccolo stacco da colonna sonora prima dell’arpeggio su chitarra acustica sullo slow-tempo di The Things, che sembra uscito direttamente da Fear of the Blank Planet dei Porcupine Tree. I suoni liquidi o dolcemente percussivi delle tastiere hanno tanto del gusto di Richard Barbieri. E’ un momento chiave, centrale dell’album costruito su un giro ancora una volta semplice, ma ampliato da una linea melodica -al contrario- imprevedibile. L’interpretazione della cantante Diandra Danieli, splendidamente replicata da Eugene nel contesto live, va ad arricchire un pezzo raffinatamente pop.

Ancora il banjo che dialoga con quel tipo di voce pulita che non ci si aspetterebbe in un blues come in The Climb. La controlinea melodica del violino ed il tappeto della fisarmonica sono spiazzanti e ci portano dritti ad una batteria sporca, da garage. Ho sempre avuto una fascinazione per il country, l’americana. Nei primi due dischi ho inserito questi elementi. Qui volevo che fossero più prominenti gli strumenti acustici, la batteria in un certo modo, le percussioni. Volevo dare un’idea di terra, di notte, di notturno. Un country, come racconta lo stesso Marco, stravolto, straniato, che sale di intensità fino all’apertura dell’arpeggio maestoso che fa esplodere tutto dopo circa due minuti: mi sono ispirato ad un documentario sugli XTC, in cui registravano la chitarra elettrica con il microfono senza attarla al jack, poi doppiata con un’altra elettrica. Io ho doppiato l’elettrica non attaccata al jack e poi la chitarra elettrica suonata con un amplificatore Vox. L’attacco, il plettro sulla corda crea un effetto stranissimo. 

L’incontro chiave della carriera di Marco Machera é stata la collaborazione con il batterista Pat Mastelotto. Conosciuto in una fase di pausa dei King Crimson, prima dell’ultima attuale reincarnazione, il batterista californiano é diventato il punto di svolta  per introdurlo alle preziose collaborazioni degli album solisti e dei suoi progetti attuali: Julie Slick, con la quale suona negli EchoTestTim Motzer, Markus Reuter, Tobias RalphIl primo contatto con Pat é stato su MySpace, nel 2009. Io in quel periodo ero pazzo di Eyes Wide Open [King Crimson DVD in Giappone del 2003]. Ero impressionato da Mastelotto, che secondo me ha raggiunto lì il picco della sua arte nella maniera in cui ha mescolato l’elettronica, nella precisione che ha raggiunto, nelle interazioni con Trey Gunn. In quel periodo stavo mettendo insieme i primi pezzi per One Time Somewhere. Gli ho scritto, gli ho spiegato il progetto e gli ho mandato le tracce. E’ nata una fiducia reciproca e da li siamo arrivati a collaborare. Mastelotto appare in Broken Windows, un interludio dalle atmosfere ipnotiche e cinematiche: il tappeto di accordi sul basso prepara il terreno al sax che si muove con una linea primordiale, su tre note. Poi l’ingresso della batteria, incisiva e incattivita di Mastelotto insieme alla fisarmonica a portarci fino alla coda del pezzo. Stiamo lavorando ad un video per accompagnare questo pezzo dal vivo. Parlandone con il filmaker, lui mi ha colpito perché ha detto come fosse il pezzo centrale del disco. Intanto perché il titolo del pezzo richiama quello del disco. E poi secondo lui c’è un cambio, il protagonista di questo racconto sta capendo alcune cose e da qui in poi le cose cambiano irreversibilmente. Si capisce senza parole, in un pezzo strumentale. Volevo un pezzo che racchiudesse il mood del disco e fosse strumentale.  

Il punto di svolta é sottolineato da Ghost Town, probabilmente l’unico pezzo che mantiene una struttura di armonia e di canzone più strutturata nel disco: e per questo forse il più vicino ai precedenti album. Fino a The House, ancora un gioiellino di interludio elettronico: stavolta é la linea vocale, eterea, inaspettata, che va ascoltata e riascoltata insieme all’accompagnamento minimale del piano elettronico di Andrea Gastaldello. Come racconta Marco: arriva un momento chiave della storia. Avevo mandato [ad Andrea Gastaldello] pochi accordi base. Lui mi ha mandato indietro questa traccia stravolta: pur mantenendo la melodia vocale, sotto ha cambiato il mondo a livello armonico. Armonia e melodia sembrano slegati. Gli avevo dato questa indicazione, ma non mi sarei aspettato questo lavoro così bello.

La storia si sta ormai concludendo, arriva il momento in cui il mostro lovecraftiano, comprende di essere l’outsider, di essere fuori dalla società e di guardarla dall’esterno. L’inquietante realizzazione é ripresa in slow motion, attraverso uno sguardo sornione, schizzato, ferito eppure in un certo senso confidente di se stesso. Wounded Heart parte tra un sample elettronico che richiama il suono di un allarme e lo spoken word che racconta la scena. Percepiamo quest’atmosfera di terrore come fossimo di fronte allo schermo della tv, in maniera mediata –vicariously, per citare un pezzo dei Tool. Il mid-tempo di batteria é il perfetto accompagnamento per la linea di basso a la Colin Edwin che fa da coda al pezzo. In poche note ci sono tante influenze che partono da lontano: dal dub, al trip-hop, ai Porcupine Tree. Un perfetto esempio che fa capire come il segreto di Small Music from Broken Windows é riuscire a nascondere ben bene queste influenze ed a farle riemergere piacevolmente decontestualizzate quando meno ce lo si aspetta. La coda di The Shards é affidata al basso ed alla voce con in aggiunta la chitarra di Tim Motzer ad amplificare i riverberi. Una perfetta chiusura onirica che riprende in maniera circolare il tema della prima traccia. 

Oltre ai suoi progetti solisti in questo momento Marco Machera si muove tra il sound misto di prog e new wave degli EchoTest -con cui ha in preparazione un nuovo lavoro per l’autunno- e le pazzesche linee dell’orchestra prog del progetto troot –la cosa più difficile che ho fatto nella mia vita! Ma sta anche scrivendo per altri e portando dal vivo il suo lavoro solista. Una polivalenza che spazia in ambiti spesso così distanti e con alle spalle gusti tanto diversi. Nella stessa intervista siamo riusciti a parlare di Iron MaidenTom Waits, Tricky e Steven Wilson: tutti in qualche modo entrano nella sua musica. Small Music from Broken Windows ha le qualità dell’outsider proprio perché viene da un musicista capace di mescolare all’interno di una canzone pop tante influenze. Porta gli ascoltatori fuori dal contesto che si aspetterebbero ed e si rende capace -come un outsider- di dire qualcosa che non ci si aspetta.

Marco Machera intervista6.jpeg

Marco Machera intervista5.jpeg

Marco Machera
Small Music from Broken Windows

The Glimpse:
Marco Machera: guitar, vocals, samples

The Labyrinth of Nighted Silence:
Marco Machera: guitar, vocals, bass, samples, percussion
Cabeki: guitar solo

Frantic:
Marco Machera: bass, vocals, banjolin, samples, percussion
Francesco Zampi: samples, drum programming

The Tower:
Marco Machera: guitar, samples
Pete Donovan: double bass
Gionata Forciniti: melodica

The Things:
Marco Machera: guitar, vocals, synth bass, kalimba, rhodes, samples
Andrea Gastaldello: piano, electronics Diandra Danieli: vocals
Toni Nordlund: drums

Climb:
Marco Machera: vocals, keyboards, accordion, samples, drums, percussion

Broken Windows:
Marco Machera: bass, samples, accordion, guitar
Toni Nordlund: drums
Pat Mastelotto: cymbow
John Porno: saxophone

Ghost Town:
Marco Machera: bass, vocals, guitar, samples, keyboards
Alessandro Inolti: drums
Pat Mastelotto: additional drums

The House:
Marco Machera: vocals, soundscape
Andrea Gastaldello: piano, electronics

Wounded Heart:
Marco Machera: bass, vocals, guitar, samples, loops
Andrea Gastaldello: electronics
Pat Mastelotto: drums

The Shards:
Marco Machera: bass, vocals
Tim Motzer: guitar synth, piano
Francesco Zampi: treatments

English version

Interview and listening session with Marco Machera, Apr 2018.

What can be said to characterize the Outisider? asked Colin Wilson in 1956 in The Outsider, the book that would make him famous. A book which is both a novel and essay, investigating in both sociology and literature fields the figure of those who are outside the society. One of the possible answers to the question is: what characterizes the Outsider is a sense of strangeness, of unreality. He sees reality in a divergent manner; incidentally, he sees a different reality, he recreates a parallel reality into his mind. There is a common ground between this excerpt and an eponymous novel by H.P. Lovecraft: despite Colin Wilson did not appreciate too much the horror master, the novel recalls the theme of a parallel world superimposed on the normal, imagined and explained via the eyes of the outsider. Through the story [SPOILER alert] of a monster told in first person, we live inside the view of someone who stands outside. Indeed, when we realize that we are the monster itself, we share its distorted perception of reality. We fell into a world and we see it through these lenses.

In Small Music from Broken Windows bassist, singer and composer Marco Machera recreates a parallel world and shows it to us through the eyes of the Outsider. This is his third solo album after One Time, Somwhere released in 2012 and Dime Novels in 2014. It marks a discontinuity with the previous ones. In the former there were evident art-rock influences –Beatles, King Crimson, new wave. With Small Music from Bronken Windows we are witnessing a change of perspective: a concept of eleven tracks encapsulated in dark atmospheres, bloody blues shaded in contemporary psychedelia and built around the strong core of a novel. The story is made by the construction of a parallel world: this music is not modulated by a cinematic quality – using a word often abused when talking of music texture – it offers a cinematic effect, indeed. We almost see through a director’s camera moving through the scenes without any rest. And the story is based on Lovecraft’s The Outsider: it is not transposed in a word-by-word manner, perhaps reporting the same drama or the words inside the songs, but translated into a cinematic atmosphere, in an aura of strangeness. The titles of the tracks are still the bridge between the novel and the album.

We dive into an unreal parallel world. You can follow narrative, but, also due to the specific of the music, I liked to keep this dreamlike, abstract effect. It is not always clear what you are talking about, where you are – tells Marco Machera during the interview. This record was born out of personal rubble, beautiful and less moments put together. I had in mind not to make a literal transfer of the Lovecraft novel, thrown into music and that’s it. I liked to adapt concepts of history to my experience. I like the idea to be like that and everyone could interpret it.

The Glimpse starts with guitar and voice without reverberation only, mimicking a delicate and intimate crooning: a brief II-V-I cadence, a bluesy touch developed in a very short bridge to slowly carry us in the mood, as if it was the introduction of the novel. The Glimpse was originally a demo; I wanted to expand it, but then I liked it like that, guitar and voice without reverberation – I wanted a record without reverberations. I have added only some small samples beneath. It’s just an appetizer of the bloody blues atmosphere in The Labyrinth of Nighted Silence. A lap steel guitar, an harmonica to recreate an atmosphere that could come out of an episode of True Detective series and the music of T Bone Burnett. Tom Waits, however, is the primary reference to mention for this very dark blues. It has its culminating point in a distorted and deviated solo performed by Cabeki, moniker of the guitarist Andrea Faccioli. For this record I had in mind to create a modern, revisited blues. At the beginning it was even more conventional with the guitar to hold the tempo. I emptied it: the foot, the harmonica and the synth that is playing underneath remained. Then I added the tremolo guitar to give this night feeling. In the version he brings live with a line-up that is partially different from that of the album, Labyrinth of Nighted Silence acquires an evocative power, a vivid and psychedelic dreamlike journey. Supported by Eugene at the keyboards, by the longtime partner Enzo Ferlazzo at guitars and the companion in EchoTest band Alessandro Inolti, Marco Machera adds layers of meaning to the pieces, increases the coefficient of dreaminess, if yet possible, in the live context.

It can be dramatically difficult to write a piece with a few chords for a progressive musician. Daniel Gildenlow of the Swedish prog metal band Pain of Salvation talks about it when, after their Ashes was awarded as song of the year by users of a well-known prog webzine in 2000. He defiantly revealed to prog fans that it consisted only of three chords (!). But you can do even more: Frantic is built on a single chord for the verse and one single for the chorus: Francesco Zampi stands for endless seconds on the same chord in the chorus, thus producing an alienating effect to listener with his keyboard. The banjo riff in loop from the intro onwards is, however, the main focus. A curious thing is that this traces of banjo was just a take. But I liked it. The problem was that the banjo was out of tune. So I had to re-arrange everything according to the banjo, for example the bass was very out of tune. When we had to try it live the musicians asked me what tuning it was (laughter). The bass moves in slide pinpointing at Tony Levin‘s style. It is no coincidence, though, as Marco knows him and played with Levin, as well as with Adrian Belew and Pat Mastelotto, since meeting them at the Three of a Perfect Pair camp. To tell the truth – Marco notes – it is a guitar played with the octaver dubbed with the real bass, to give it more thickness, an Eventide octaver. The sound, however, was too low on the bass; I duplicated the track and took it an octave down. It almost seems like it sounds fretless, but it’s actually a guitar that moves on a single string. Carrying it an octave below, it gave the particular grain to the sound.

Small Music from Broken Windows took a long time to produced for a record sounding with a kind of urgency and made of short tracks -only one piece is over 5 mins, almost all are under 4 mins. I started writing it after Dime Novels came out, so even end 2013 and all 2014 and 2015. Then it remained unchanged. It could even be published in 2016. But then of course, waiting, I had the opportunity to perfect, refine it as I wanted, according to what I had in mind. It’s the first record I can listen to without having the desire to make any change. With Dime Novels I chased my idea of perfection for the sounds I had in mind, for the arrangements so intensely that then I finally found that I no longer had the final sense of the record. Even for Small Music from Broken Windows I looked for perfectionism, but I found what I was looking for more easily. I was happy, I stopped and I was happy I had stopped. Now I play the record again and I can say everything is in its place.

This record leans more forward a sense of atmosphere than one of complex writing. Something that perhaps distances it from the eliticism of the classic prog, but resembles somewhat a Kscope new-proggish sound. Thinking for example about No-Man, Steven Wilson, Tim Bowness. The Tower is the first instrumental interlude, built around a guitar chorus and a soft intervention by Gionata Forciniti‘s melodica. An intimate soundtrack before the arpeggio on acoustic guitar at slow-tempo starting the The Things. This seems to come straight from Porcupine Tree’s Fear of the Blank Planet. The liquid and softly percussive sounds emerging out of the keyboards have a lot in common with the taste of Richard Barbieri. It is a key moment, pivotal in the record built on a once again simple chord structure, but still expanded by an unpredictable melodic line. Singer Diandra Danieli -stunningly replayed by Eugene in the live context- contributes to enrich a polished pop song.

Still the banjo dialoguing with that kind of clean voice that one would not expect in a blues like in The Climb. The countermelody by the violin and the accordion soundscape feel unsettling and lead us straight to a dirty, garage drumming. I’ve always had a fascination for country, the American. In the first two records I added these elements. Here I was looking for the acoustic instruments, the drums, the percussion, to be more evident. I chose to give a feel of ​​land, night, nocturnal. A country track, as told by Marco himself, which is rendered as distorted, estranged, that rises in intensity until the majestic arpeggio that makes everything explode after two minutes: I was inspired by a documentary about the XTC. They recorded the electric guitar with a microphone without inserting it into the jack. Then they dubbed it with another electric one. I dubbed the electric one with no jack and then the electric guitar played with a Vox amplifier. The strum, the pick on the string creates a strange effect.

The pivotal moment in Marco Machera‘s career was meeting drummer Pat Mastelotto. Meeting him in a pause in King Crimson’s duties, before the current reincarnation, the Californian drummer has become the turning point to introduce him to those precious collaborations to his solo albums and to his current projects: Julie Slick, whom he plays with in the EchoTest, Tim Motzer, Markus Reuter, Tobias Ralph. My first contact with Pat was on MySpace, in 2009. At that time I was crazy about Eyes Wide Open [King Crimson DVD in Japan 2003]. I was impressed by Mastelotto, who in my opinion reached the peak of his art in the way he mixed the electronics, in the precision he gained, in the interplay with Trey Gunn. At that time I was putting together the first pieces for One Time Somewhere. I wrote him, I explained the project to him and sent him the tracks. A mutual trust was born and we started collaborating since then. Mastelotto appears in Broken Windows, an interlude with hypnotic and cinematic atmospheres: the chords soundscape by the bass prepares the ground for the sax, which moves on with a primordial melody, played on three notes. Then entering the incisive and mean drumming by Mastelotto together with the accordion to lift us up until the coda. We are working on a video to play during this piece live. Talking to the filmmaker, he hit me because he said this was the main track of the album. First, because the title of the piece recalls that of the record. And then, according to him, there is a change. The main character of this story is understanding some things and from here on things change irreversibly. It is explained without words, in an instrumental piece. I wanted a piece that contained the mood of the record and was instrumental too.

The turning point is underlined by Ghost Town, probably the only piece to maintain a standard harmonical and song structure: and since perhaps the closest to previous records feel. Up to The House, a jewel of electronic interlude: this time it is the vocal line, ethereal, unexpected, that must be listened to and listened again together with the minimal accompaniment of Andrea Gastaldello‘s electronic piano to take the scene. As Marco says: a key moment in history apporaches. I sent a few basic chords [to Andrea Gastaldello]. He sent me back this twisted track: while maintaining the vocal melody, he changed everything in the harmony structure. Chords and melody seem unrelated. I had given him this indication, but I would have not expected this to be so beautiful.

The story is now ending, the moment comes when the Lovecraftian monster understands he is the outsider, understands he stands out of society and to looks at it from the outside. The uncomfortable realization is pictured in slow motion, through a sly view, sketched, wounded and yet in a certain sense self confident. Wounded Heart starts with an electronic sample that recalls the sound of an alarm and the spoken words that explain the scene. We perceive this atmosphere of terror as we were in front of a TV screen, mediated -vicariously, to quote Tool. The mid-tempo rhythm is the perfect accompaniment for the Colin Edwin-like bass which enters at the end of the song. In a few notes there are many influences that come from afar: dub, trip-hop, Porcupine Tree. A perfect example that shows how the secret of Small Music from Broken Windows is to hide well these influences and make them reemerge pleasantly in a different context when you least expect them. The ending The Shards is made of bass and vocals with the addition of Tim Motzer‘s guitar to amplify the reverberations. A perfect onirical closure that moves from the theme of the first track, thus in a circular manner.

In addition to his solo projects Marco Machera is now moving between the new nave/prog sounds of EchoTest – they are preparing a new work to be released in autumn – and the crazy prog orchestra intricacies of the troot project – the hardest thing I’ve done in my life! But he is also writing for others and bringing his solo work live. A versatility that ranges in areas often so distant and with so many different tastes behind. In the same interview we were able to talk about Iron Maiden, Tom Waits, Tricky and Steven Wilson: they all enter his music somehow. Small Music from Broken Windows has the qualities of the outsider because it comes from a musician capable of mixing many influences within a pop song. It takes listeners out of the context (s)he would expect, and makes him/her -as an outsider- able to say something that is not expected.

Marco Machera
Small Music from Broken Windows

The Glimpse:
Marco Machera: guitar, vocals, samples

The Labyrinth of Nighted Silence:
Marco Machera: guitar, vocals, bass, samples, percussion
Cabeki: guitar solo

Frantic:
Marco Machera: bass, vocals, banjolin, samples, percussion
Francesco Zampi: samples, drum programming

The Tower:
Marco Machera: guitar, samples
Pete Donovan: double bass
Gionata Forciniti: melodica

The Things:
Marco Machera: guitar, vocals, synth bass, kalimba, rhodes, samples
Andrea Gastaldello: piano, electronics Diandra Danieli: vocals
Toni Nordlund: drums

Climb:
Marco Machera: vocals, keyboards, accordion, samples, drums, percussion

Broken Windows:
Marco Machera: bass, samples, accordion, guitar
Toni Nordlund: drums
Pat Mastelotto: cymbow
John Porno: saxophone

Ghost Town:
Marco Machera: bass, vocals, guitar, samples, keyboards
Alessandro Inolti: drums
Pat Mastelotto: additional drums

The House:
Marco Machera: vocals, soundscape
Andrea Gastaldello: piano, electronics

Wounded Heart:
Marco Machera: bass, vocals, guitar, samples, loops
Andrea Gastaldello: electronics
Pat Mastelotto: drums

The Shards:
Marco Machera: bass, vocals
Tim Motzer: guitar synth, piano
Francesco Zampi: treatments

Perfect Beings – Vier [InsideOut 2018]

English version

La voce armonizzata a la Jacob Collier parte a cappella in un funky in 7/4, preparando il terreno al basso, che lavora lo stesso tempo con un pattern in 2+4+4+4 ricco di irregolarità e groove in stile Chris Squire. E poi a cascata un solo ricco di feel del sax soprano per nulla spaventato dagli accenti irregolari. E quindi uno stacco orchestrale su cui un cordofono disegna poche note. Che diventa un piacevole electro pop (ancora in 7), dove il cordofono dialoga con la voce. Come in un caleidoscopio, vediamo immagini che già riconosciamo ed in cui ci siamo già imbattuti, ma ricomposte in una maniera nuova e sempre diversa. Abbiamo già visto tutto, ma non riusciamo a staccarci, perché c’é un filo rosso che ci tiene li ad ascoltare dall’inizio alla fine. Sono i primi minuti di Vier, terzo lavoro della band prog californiana Perfect Beings, che scatena il gioco delle citazioni tra progressive più o meno sinfonico, art rock, inserti jazz mainstream, pop cantato e classica. In ogni momento, per parafrasare il libro di un critico d’arte contemporanea, sembra di poter dire ‘lo potevo fare anche io’: poi ascoltando più attentamente si capisce che nessuno l’aveva fatto ancora così.

Nati nel 2012 da una costola dei Moth Vellum, a cavallo tra prog e Aor -rimando a The Progressive Aspect– hanno all’attivo due album omonimi, prima di passare alla major del prog InsideOut proprio per Vier. Attraverso vari cambi di formazione, la band ruota attorno al chitarrista tedesco trapiantato negli Stati Uniti Johannes Luley, al tastierista Jesse Nason ed alla voce di Ryan Hurtgen. Per la registrazione sono accompagnati da Jason Lobell al basso, Brett McDonald ai fiati e Ben Levin alla batteria, che ha lasciato il gruppo subito dopo le sessioni per Sean Reinert dei Cynic (ex Death, Gordian Knot).

Nei primi due lavori la struttura preferita é quella della forme canzone ricca di arrangiamenti sopraffini, tipici della migliore scena new prog: la perfezione formale dei Big Big Train, i tocchi spaziali di Dave Kerzner Lonely Robot, l’equilibrio tra progressive e sintetizzatori contemporanei dei *Frost. Ma é evidente che le influenze vanno ai capisaldi Yes, Genesis e Pink Floyd. Vier spariglia le carte: registrato in un anno di lavoro, é organizzato su quattro facciate da doppio LP, ognuna dedicata ad una suite e divisa in parti –Vier significa ‘quattro’ in tedesco e olandese. Un formato che richiama alla memoria Tales of Topographic Oceans. Ma se l’album più discusso degli Yes espandeva ognuno dei pezzi in maniera ipertrofica, qui l’approccio é semmai l’opposto: le parti di ogni suite sono tracce separate. Ognuna é caratterizzata da una cascata ininterrotta di temi, melodie travestita da pop e solo apparentemente facili, a cui vengono concessi solo pochi secondi, prima di passare ad un’altra invenzione sonora. C’é raramente un momento di respiro, di stasi musicale, vanno sempre in cerca di una nuova atmosfera, senza mai perdere il filo rosso e l’equilibrio formale, senza mai neanche lontanamente eccedere verso l’eccesso di parti strumentali.

Così la prima suite Guedra passa dalla intro ad una sezione pianoforte e voce che, proprio nel momento in cui rischia di suonare zuccherosa, modula alla melodica minore e diventa un lento marziale, sinfonico nella parte Blue Lake of Understanding. La seguente Patience parte con un’intro beatleasiana, vira nel più classico progressive con synth in evidenza, e poi si tramuta nel piacevole tappeto conclusivo di Enter the Center in un ostinato in 9/8. Come racconta Johannes Luley in un’intervista a Nosefull, ogni suite ha la firma principale di uno dei membri della band: se Guedra era stata ideata da Ryan Hurtgen, la successiva viene dalla farina del sacco proprio di Luley.

The Golden Arc é una lunga suite orchestrale, che vale da sola il prezzo del biglietto dell’intero album e dimostra la capacità di arrangiamento e composizione avanzatissima della band. Il pianoforte porta una melodia sul Sol 7 minore fino all’ingresso del flauto dopo un minuto e trenta: entra il primo tema, una linea cromatica a la Debussy accompagnata da un ritmo terzinato da bolero. Si arriva ad un secondo tema portato dal synth intorno ai tre minuti, ricco di salti e più atonale. Il mood rimane quieto mentre il secondo tema viene concluso da una misteriosa scala diminuita. Un soave valzer, che riprende il terzinato del bolero, accompagna l’ingresso della voce per poi sfociare nella burrascosa ripresa del secondo tema. Ancora la voce di Hurtgens chiude in maniera misteriosa The Persimmon Tree. La seguente sottotraccia Turn the World Off riparte dal secondo tema, stavolta con la band in aggiunta all’orchestra, e attraverso una pogressione sempre più scura arriva ad un aggressivo finale. Mike Oldfield é un riferimento costante ogni volta che si parla di prog sinfonico, ed ovviamente non manca il confronto neanche qui. La voce di Hutgens, pulita, melodica e duttile, stavolta richiama Jakko Jakszyk; paragone tanto appropriato visto che Luley indica la formazione attuale dei King Crimson come fonte di ispirazione, come una vera e propria ‘orchestra moderna’. La successiva parte della suite, America, richiama il primo tema e lascia spazio ad un solo sanguigno e viscerale, che mi richiama alla mente Gary Moore e Neal Schon, prima della conclusione corale di For a Pound of Flesh.

Jesse Nason mette la firma sulla suite Vibrational, più ricca di synth e di atmosfere che richiamano i Tangerine Dream e le atmosfere new age. Un punto di riferimento potrebbe essere il primo Vangelis più prog o Olias of Sunhillow di Jon Anderson. E la quarta suite Anunnaki mischia insieme tutti gli elementi precedenti, dal pompatissimo dialogo tra orchestra e tastiere in Pattern of Light o la deliziosa ballad a la Nick Drake di A Compromise.

Il gioco delle citazioni e del cosa-ricorda-cosa con i Perfect Beings é inevitabile. Ma con Vier fanno il salto di qualità: ogni melodia modula ad una nuovo melodia quando meno ce lo si aspetta e quando tutto sembra diventare prevedibile. Un lavoro travestito di semplicità ed immediatezza, che più che attirare l’ascoltatore sembra quasi ingannarlo. Appena ci si aspetta che la musica ci porti in una direzione, allora ne prende l’altra. Il tutto attraverso un tema conduttore sotterraneo che lega in maniera perfetta Vier.

Perfect Beings
Vier
1. Guedra 00:18:23
2. The Golden Arc 00:16:47
3. Vibrational 00:18:17
4. Anunnaki 00:18:42

Ryan Hurtgen (Vocals, Piano)
Johannes Luley (Guitar, Bass, Produktion)
Jesse Nason (Keyboards)
Ben Levin (Drums)

English version

Enter a solo Jacob Collier-like harmonized voice rolling a 7/4 funky rhythm, preparing the ground for the bassline, which counterpoints the metric with a 2 + 4 + 4 + 4 pattern full of irregularities and groove, much like in Chris Squire style. Following a cascading groovy solo by soprano sax, which does not feels any pressure of irregular accents. Then an orchestral break on which a string instrument draws a few notes. Which incidentally becomes a fancy electro pop (still in 7) that paves the road for the string instrument interacting with voice. As in a kaleidoscope, we see images that we already know and we already seen before, but recomposed in a new and continuously different way. We have already met everything, but we can not detach ourselves, because there is a red thread that keeps us there to listen from beginning until the end. These are the first minutes from Vier, third album by Californian proggers Perfect Beings, which starts a game of quotations about influences between more or less symphonic progressive, art rock, mainstream jazz inserts, pop and classical pop. At any moment, to paraphrase the book of a contemporary art critic, it seems we can tell ‘I could do it too’: then, listening more carefully, we understand that nobody had done it that way before.

Born in 2012 from prog and Aor influenced Moth Vellum -check The Progressive Aspect– they produced two omonymous albums, before signing with prog master label InsideOut for Vier. Through various line-up changes, the band’s core is made by German-born, but US living guitarist Johannes Luley, keyboardist Jesse Nason and singer Ryan Hurtgen. For this recording they are supported by Jason Lobell on bass, Brett McDonald on the winds and Ben Levin on drums, who left the band immediately after the sessions for Cynic‘s Sean Reinert (formerly as well in Death, Gordian Knot).

In first two albums they preferred standard song structure enriched with superlative arrangements, typical of the best new prog scene: recalling formal perfection by Big Big Train, spatial atmospheres by Dave Kerzner and Lonely Robot, balance between progressive and contemporary synth sounds by * Frost. But it is clear that the influences go to the former Yes, Genesis and Pink Floyd. Vier mixes the ground: recorded in a year of work, it is made of a double LP four sides, each dedicated to a suite and divided into parts –Vier incidentally meaning ‘four’ in German and Dutch. No surprise that the format quotes Tales of Topographic Oceans. But if Yes‘s most discussed album expanded each of the pieces in a gigantic way, here the approach is the opposite: each suite is made of separate tracks. Each is characterized by an uninterrupted cascade of themes, melodies masked as pop and only seemingly easy, which are only given a few seconds before moving on to another sonic invention. There is rarely a moment of breath or musical pause, they always go in search of a new moods, without ever losing the red thread and the formal balance, without ever exceeding the excess of instrumental parts.

Initial first suite Guedra moves from the intro to a piano and voice section that, just in the moment when it is becoming mellow, takes a modulation through the minor melodic scale and becomes a martial and symphonic slow tempo in the Blue Lake of Understanding. Following piece Patience starts with a Beatles intro, turns into a classic progressive track with synths over the top, and then turns into the pleasant ending soundscape of Enter the Center in a 9/8 ostinato. As Johannes Luley indicates in an interview with Nosefull, each suite has the main signature of one of the band members on it: if Guedra was drafted by Ryan Hurtgen, the next comes from Luley‘s own writing.

The Golden Arc is a long orchestral suite, which alone is worth the ticket price of the whole album and demonstrates how the band is advance in arranging and composition ability. The piano brings a melody on the minor G7 until flute’s entrance after a minute and thirty: enter the first theme, a colorful melody in the style of Debussy over a bolero rhythm. Then the second theme brought by the synth around three minutes, more inclined to intervals and atonality. Mood remains quiet, while second theme is ending in a mysterious diminished scale. A gentle waltz, which takes up the three against two rhythm of bolero, accompanies voice entrance and then flows into the stormy ending of the second theme. Again the voice of Hurtgens mysteriously closes The Persimmon Tree. The following sub-track Turn the World Off starts from where the second theme ended, this time including the band in addition to the orchestra, and through an increasingly dark pogression arrives at an aggressive final. Mike Oldfield is a constant comparison every time symphonic prog is mentioned, and obviously here too. Hutgens‘s voice is now clean, melodic and ductile, this time recalling Jakko Jakszyk; comparison sounding as much as appropriate since Luley indicates the current lineup of King Crimson as a source of inspiration, like a real ‘modern orchestra’. The next part of the suite, America, moves back to the first theme and opens the curtain for a bloody and rich guitar solo, which reminds me much of Gary Moore and Neal Schon, until the whole-band coda in For a Pound of Flesh.

Jesse Nason puts his mark on Vibrational suite, rich of synths and Tangerine Dream, new age atmospheres. A comparison to be made with Vangelis early prog or Jon Anderson‘s Olias of Sunhillow. And the fourth suite Anunnaki mixes all the previous elements together, like the supergroovy dialogue between orchestra and keyboards in Pattern of Light or the delicate nickdrakey ballad in A Compromise.

The finding the quotations and what-recalls-what game with Perfect Beings is inevitable. But Vier is a leap forward: every melody modulates to a new melody, when you least expect it and when everything seems to become predictable. A work disguised as simple and immediate, which, rather than attracting the listener, seems almost to deceive him. As soon as music is expected to take us in one direction, then it takes the other. All this through an subterrean theme that perfectly binds Vier‘s superb quality.

Perfect Beings
Vier
1. Guedra 00:18:23
2. The Golden Arc 00:16:47
3. Vibrational 00:18:17
4. Anunnaki 00:18:42

Ryan Hurtgen (Vocals, Piano)
Johannes Luley (Guitar, Bass, Produktion)
Jesse Nason (Keyboards)
Ben Levin (Drums)

Dominique Vantomme – Vegir [MoonJune 2018]

English version

Un’ostinato costituito su un accordo di Fender Rhodes, una nota di basso in slide dal registro basso a quello alto, un soundscape di chitarra ed i piatti a portare un rock moderato. Pochi ingredienti, eppure capaci di tenere l’ascolto incollato nel senso di attesa per qualcosa che lentamente succederà, per sette minuti, senza far sentire il passare del tempo. Non cambierà molto di questo scenario, ma quando prima la chitarra porta una nota con la lead, poi il basso ripete il suo stesso tema con la compressione la tensione cresce con lentezza. Ecco che anche il Rhodes risponde: una piccola scala ascendente, quasi completamente fuori tonalità. Che cambia e completa finalmente il senso del tutto. E’ uno dei rarissimi interventi solisti di Double Down, pezzo di apertura di Vegir di Dominique Vantomme. Una traccia costruita attorno ad un tema scarno e l’improvvisazione del quartetto creato dal pianista belga, che crea un senso di tensione dilatatissimo, che esploderà nel finale del pezzo. E quella piccola scala vale da sola il prezzo del biglietto.

Dominique Vantomme é al primo lavoro con la MoonJune Records ed é una scoperta, anche se di scoperta non si può parlare visto che lui e Leonardo Pavkovic si conoscono da tempo. I due si sono ripromessi in passato di lavorare insieme, ed oggi Vegir ne é il prodotto. Pianista belga con una base classica presto passato al jazz, Vantomme nel frattempo ha portato avanti il trio Root, con il quale ha sviluppato una miscela che ricorda tanto jazz contemporaneo europeo: improvvisazione bilanciata da cadenze classiche ed armonia jazz, linee aggressive, vicine al prog, o cadenze melanconiche che richiamano il neoclassicismo e che troviamo spesso in tanti trii oggi, come ad esempio i Gogo Penguin.

Quando Pavkovic fa ascoltare una registrazione di questo trio a Tony Levin, nasce l’idea di incastrare una giornata di session tra il tour degli Stick Men e la leg europea dei King Crimson. In meno di una settimana viene organizzata la session di lavoro, dove Levin e Vantomme vengono raggiunti dal chitarrista -ed insegnante di letteratura, per inciso- belga Michel Deville, già presente in album della MoonJune sotto vari nomi, douBt, Machine Mass, The Wrong Object, quest’ultimo gruppo in cui aveva suonato anche con Elton Dean. A loro si aggiunge, su suggerimento di Vantomme, il batterista Maxime Lessens. E la session avviene in una giornata, il 29 ottobre 2017. Pochi temi, portati da Vantomme, e perlopiù improvvisazione del quartetto.

Sizzurp ha una partenza alla Porcupine Tree prima maniera: Lessens porta un groove sui tamburi che potremmo sentire da Gavin Harrison, mentre la cadenza struggente del Fender Rhodes, ricca di riverberi e tremolo, viene contrappuntata da Tony Levin. Pochi minuti di intro vengono sviluppati in maniera psichedelica e dilatatissima. Deville predilige più creare atmosfere distorte, ricche di wah wah o whammy, che i soli. Più volte ricorda Jean-Paul Bourelly, entrambi non a caso influenzati da Hendrix: il francese con i suoi tributi regolari, mentre Delville l’anno scorso ha pubblicato un tributo con i Machine Mass.

Fa parzialmente eccezione Emmetropia dove é il chitarrista a portare l’ostinato sul quale Levin costruisce uno dei suoi inconfondibili temi semplici, immediati e potenti. Prima Delville, poi ancora Vantomme con un solo denso e carico di intensità -ancora una volta é la scelta delle note out a fare la differenza! Un’altro momento del pianista belga é in Playing Chess with Barney Rubble: un groove solido guidato da Tony Levin al basso con le bacchette lascia spazio nella parte centrale ad una progressione galoppante, solare di Vantomme, che al pianoforte elettrico modula tra diverse tonalità. Un solo in cui si apprezza il suo sound ricco di echi, con grandissimo gusto, prima del finale del pezzo che cresce pian piano in aggressività. E merita di essere citata la chiusura dell’album affidata alla breve Odin’s Wig, che mette in luce un Delville che richiama il Terje Rypdal di Odyssey.

Vegir é un album con un sound molto coeso: ritmi moderati, una sonorità stabile tra i vari pezzi, equilibrio tra i momenti di acidità ed intensità da una parte e le sonorità calde e brillantine, soprattutto del Rhodes dall’altra -si sente il lavoro di mastering di Mark Wingfield. Le improvvisazioni sono dilatate -ad esclusione dell’ultima, un frammento, la traccia più breve é la prima con i suoi sette minuti- e non forzano mai per cercare soluzioni estreme, ma sviluppano in maniera coerente la propria premessa. Tony Levin é un marchio di fabbrica in un lavoro di improvvisazione, ma Vantomme é la vera scoperta.

Dominique Vantomme
Vegir

1.Double Down 07:36
2.Equal Minds 10:19
3.Sizzurp 10:45
4.Playing Chess With Barney Rubble 09:04
5.The Self Licking Ice-cream Cone 13:08
6.Plutocracy 04:38
7.Agent Orange 09:46
8.Emmetropia 09:00
9.Odin’s Wig 01:54

DOMINIQUE VANTOMME: Fender Rhodes Electric Piano, Piano, Mini Moog, Mellotron
MICHEL DELVILLE: Electric Guitar
TONY LEVIN: Bass Guitar, Chapman Stick
MAXIME LENSSENS: Drums

English version

An ostinato chord built on Fender Rhodes, a bass note sliding from the low to the high register, a guitar soundscape and cymbals sustaining a moderate rock. Few ingredients, yet able to keep the listener sitting in the sense of waiting for something that will slowly happen, lasting seven minutes, without time passing by. It will not change much in this scenario, until guitar sustains a note with the lead and bass repeats its own theme adding the compression, then the tension grows slowly. Finally Rhodes answers them: a small upward scale, almost completely out of tonality. This changes and completes the meaning of the whole piece. It is one of the rare solos in Double Down, the opening track in Vegir by Dominique Vantomme. A track built around a lean theme and the quartet improvising on it, which creates a sense of expanded tension exploding at the end of the piece. And that small scale alone is worth the price of the ticket.

Dominique Vantomme marks his first solo work with MoonJune Records and it is a discovery, even if him and Leonardo Pavkovic know each other for a long time. The two have pledged themselves in the past, and today Vegir is the outcome. The Belgian pianist started with classical education and soon switched to jazz. In the meantime he built up his own Root trio, with whom he developed a blend reminiscent of contemporary European jazz: improvisation balanced by classical cadences and jazz harmony, aggressive lines, close to the prog sounds, or melancholic cadences that recall neoclassicism which we often find in many trios today, such as the Gogo Penguin.

When Pavkovic lets Tony Levin listening to their recording, they come to the idea of setting up a day session between the Stick Men tour and the European leg of King Crimson. In less than a week the working session is set up and Levin and Vantomme are joined by the Belgian guitarist -and a literature teacher, worth mentioning- Michel Deville. He is a long veteran in MoonJune under various monikers as douBt, Machine Mass, The Wrong Object, the latter group he played with Elton Dean. Drummer Maxime Lessens is added to the band following Vantomme’s suggestion. And the session takes place in a day, October 29th, 2017. Few themes, brought by Vantomme, and most of all improvisation of the quartet.

Sizzurp has a Porcupine Tree influenced intro: Lessens brings a groove on the drums we could have heard from Gavin Harrison, while the poignant cadence of Fender Rhodes, full of reverbs and tremolo, is counterpointed by Tony Levin. A few minutes of intro are developed in a psychedelic and widened manner. Deville focuses on creating distorted atmospheres, full of wah wah or whammy, more than soloing. He reminds Jean-Paul Bourelly several times, incidentally both inspired by Hendrix: the French with his regular tributes, while Delville published a tribute with Machine Mass last year.

Emmetropia makes an exception: it is the guitarist who brings the ostinato on which Levin builds one of his simple, immediate and powerful trademark themes. Initially Delville brings a solo, then again Vantomme playing an intense one -once again it is the choice of the notes he makes that makes the difference! Playing Chess with Barney Rubble is yet another landmark by the Belgian pianist: a solid groove led by Tony Levin on the bass with chopsticks makes way to a fast, solar, modulating progression by Vantomme at electric piano. The highlight is again his tasteful solo full of echo, before the closure, growing in aggressiveness. And it is worth mentioning the closing track of the album, the short Odin’s Wig, which showcases Delville remembering Terje Rypdal of Odyssey.

Vegir is made up with an highly cohesive sound: moderate rhythms, a stable sound among the various pieces, balance between moments of acid and intensity on one side and the warm and brilliant tones, especially from Rhodes, on the other -a mark to the mastering made by Mark Wingfield. Improvisations are extended -with the exclusion of the last one, a fragment, the shorter is the first track with its seven minutes- never pushing too much over the boundaries, but those are always developed as to coherently develop their own premise. Tony Levin is a trademark in the improvisation field, but Vantomme is a true discovery.

Dominique Vantomme
Vegir

1.Double Down 07:36
2.Equal Minds 10:19
3.Sizzurp 10:45
4.Playing Chess With Barney Rubble 09:04
5.The Self Licking Ice-cream Cone 13:08
6.Plutocracy 04:38
7.Agent Orange 09:46
8.Emmetropia 09:00
9.Odin’s Wig 01:54

DOMINIQUE VANTOMME: Fender Rhodes Electric Piano, Piano, Mini Moog, Mellotron
MICHEL DELVILLE: Electric Guitar
TONY LEVIN: Bass Guitar, Chapman Stick
MAXIME LENSSENS: Drums

Samuel Hällkvist – Variety of Rhythm [BoogiePost recordings 2017]

English version

Nella sua autobiografia il compositore John Adams racconta così il finale di Grand Pianola Music: ‘Inizia con un lungo e sostenuto accordo di settima dominante che pulsa e vibra per sessanta battute prima di sgorgare in un virtuale Niagara di arpeggi del pianoforte. Quel che segue é una melodia assolutamente familiare, una specie di Ur-Melodie. Pensate di averla già sentita, ma non riuscite a ricordare dove o quando. In realtà é un motivo originale’ [John Adams, Hallelujah Junction, EDT]. Questo passaggio mi é rivenuto in mente ascoltando Variety of Rhythm, una suite composta dal chitarrista svedese Samuel Hällkvist. Un lavoro che é più uno studio sull’ascolto del ritmo e sulle percezioni uditive, trattate alla stessa maniera con la quale si studiano i meccanismi delle illusioni visive, come quelle ritratte sulla copertina. E che ci porta in un mondo di archeologie di suoni, che in ogni momento ci fanno riconoscere Ur-Melodie -anzi in questo caso più Ur-Ritmi– che non ricordavamo di ricordare, come nel caso dell’esempio di John Adams.

Variety of Rhythm é il quarto lavoro solista del chitarrista svedese, ma trapiantato in terra danese, Samuel Hällkvist. Ed é anche il terzo della serie Variety of dopo Variety of Loud (2012) e Variety of Live (2015). Ascoltando la sua discografia in ogni lavoro si vede una direzione, una sperimentazione in un aspetto differente rispetto al precedente. Utilizza una base di chitarra preferibilmente pulita, a cui unisce un lavoro sempre focalizzato su ritmi e poliritmie, sviluppando melodia ed armonia in maniera funzionale allo sviluppo ritmico del brano. Regala pochi soli e preferisce lavorare sulla struttura dei pezzi, utilizzando sonorità che spaziano dal jazz misto di americana di Bill Frisell al math rock, alla psichedelia pinkfloydiana, all’avanguardia, all’elettronica, alla musiche asiatiche, al progressive strumentale tirato -ma mai pomposo, anzi sottilmente ironico, in stile Mats/Morgan Band. Non a caso Samuel ha lavorato con Morgan Agren, oltre che citare le collaborazioni, tra le altre, con Pat MastelottoDavid Torn -quest’ultimo presente anche in questo lavoro- e con la trombettista Yazz Ahmed, il cui Le Saboteuse é stato uno dei lavori più interessanti del 2017. Ed é recentemente membro stabile della storica band svedese prog Isildurs Bane, che l’anno scorso ha lavorato con Steve Hogarth per Colours Not Found in Nature.

Per questo lavoro ha messo insieme un gruppo di 12 musicisti ed ha registrato parti della suite tra Scandinavia, Parigi, Giappone, Anversa, Portogallo e Stati Uniti. Ognuno dei team nelle varie location (vedete sotto la tracklist) ha in carico una parte dei totali 43 minuti del pezzo, che si sviluppano senza interruzioni in tre tronconi principali di composizione scritta, sviluppati in una struttura di forma-sonata di presentazione e ricapitolazione ed inframezzati da segmenti improvvisati. L’inizio della prima parte, Double Adagio, é affidata alla voce di Qarin Wikström ed al basso di Dick Lövgren dei Meshuggah, che costruiscono il primo ostinato sul battito di metronomo portato dal vibrafono di Kumiko Takara. L’ingresso della batteria porta la prima poliritmia. Come Hällkvist descrive nel sito Variety of, creato apposta per spiegare l’analisi musicale del pezzo e la sua costruzione, sentiamo non più di tre accordi ripetuti per molteplici battute mentre tutti gli strumenti dialogano tra un ritmo di 3 ed uno di 7. Sentiamo un gamelan danzante ed allegro sul quale Hällkvist costruisce linee intense con la distorsione lead della chitarra ricca di riverberi fino ai quattro minuti dove la batteria esce per gli ultimi accordi conclusivi dell’intro.

Dietro Variety of Rhythm c’é una forte visione d’insieme a guidare la composizione di questo lavoro, che é legato a doppio filo con la percezione. La psicologia della Gestalt ha analizzato in maniera approfondita la percezione, ponendola per la prima volta al centro della disciplina. Nel 1912 Max Wertheimer, studiando le illusioni visive, sviluppò il concetto di forma, che nella psicologia gestaltica rappresenta l’organizzazione unitaria a livello psichico di elementi che i nostri organi di senso hanno recepito singolarmente. La scena percettiva é già ricca di rapporti tra gli elementi che abbiamo di fronte, come ad esempio nell’esperimento di due lampade vicine che si accendono e spengono velocemente e che il nostro occhio tende a percepire come un’unica lampada. Il nostro occhio, così come il nostro orecchio, riesce a cogliere le interazioni tra gli elementi che avvengono fuori dal campo percettivo. L’esempio visuale di questo processo mentale é suggerito dallo stesso Hällkvist con il titolo di uno dei pezzi principali, The Necker Cube, una figura che gioca sull’illusione cognitiva che ci provoca. I nostri sensi raccolgono più di quello che c’é nella somma delle singole parti.

Hällkvist segue questa via per sviluppare il rapporto tra i ritmi nel suo lavoro. In ogni momento l’ascolto rimbalza come un elastico tra i vari livelli del pezzo, attuando un vero doppio circuito: da un lato il dialogo tra i battiti, intesi come metri, dall’altro quelli tra i ritmi, intesi come costruzioni complessi di accenti e battute in un sistema di segni e di rimandi culturali. Ad esempio nel breve intermezzo improvvisato incollato tra il primo movimento ed il secondo, Tete-a-tete/Blivet, che incomincia intorno ai 5 minuti, pur non percependo battiti, l’ascoltatore continua a portare il ritmo all’interno del proprio ascolto. La seconda parte inizia con un tappeto lento e psichedelico sul quale la chitarra di Hällkvist ed il violino di Liesbeth Lambrecht portano un tema sfasato che va su e giù tra registro alto e basso. La batteria esce dopo circa due minuti lasciando spazio ad una chitarra effettata con un delay tipico del David Gilmour anni ’80. Sceglie un effetto iperabusato dai chitarristi, così rischioso di suonare scontato, con il quale, invece, Samuel costruisce un momento rilassante e spaziale. Le tastiere di Pete Drungle, il basso e la batteria si reinnestano creando una tensione crescente ed utilizzando tutta la scala cromatica. Siamo in un viaggio che parte dai Pink Floyd ed arriva ai primi Porcupine Tree. Un momento che vale il prezzo del biglietto.

Alla fine della parte, prima il vibrafono porta un tema ossessivo mantenendo lo stesso battito che l’ascoltatore ha ormai introiettato, poi, mantenendo la stessa metrica, la successiva improvvisazione di David Torn costruisce un soundscape intenso, che riprende i suoni dell’ultimo lavoro solista per ECM, Only Sky. La terza parte inizia intorno ai 26 minuti come la precedente, con poche note portate dal vibrafono che dialoga con la batteria alternando ritmi quaternari a terzinati e cambiando l’accordo sottostante ad ogni cambio di ritmo. Il ritmo é rallentato mentre ci focalizziamo sulle relazioni tra i differenti patterns. Quando l’orecchio si focalizza sulle similitudini con il minimalismo ecco che richiama il gamelan o le pentatoniche della musica orientale, il prog rock oppure il folk americano.

L’ascolto di Variety of Rhythm avviene ad un livello più profondo di quello del semplice ascolto. Percepiamo uno sviluppo del brano sottostante, mascherato dalle illusioni sonore create ad arte. Ma non é un trucco scenico, quanto un vero e proprio dialogo tra i ritmi all’interno del lavoro, al quale si prende parte in maniera attiva trovando sempre particolari nuovi ad ogni ascolto.

Samuel Hällkvist

Variety of Rhythm

*DOUBLE ADAGIO : TJSP
A1 : TP
trio 1 clip 1: TEAM JAPAN
*TETE-A-TETE / BLIVET: TJSPA
trio 2 clip 1: TP
*huly marga : TU
B1: TP
improv 1 clip 3: TP
A2: TP
*THE NECKER CUBE: TJSPA
B2: TP
*part of ADAGIO DOUBLE: TJS
C2: TP
trio 1 clip 2: TJ
*part of TETE-A-TETE / BLIVET: TJSPA

Samuel Hällkvist, guitar
Dick Lövgren, bass
Qarin Wikström, voice
Knut Finsrud, drums
Liesbeth Lambrecht, violin
Pete Drungle, keys
David Torn, guitar
Yasuhiro Yoshigaki, drums
Kumiko Takara, vibraphone
Paulo Chagas, sax, flute
Silvia Corda, misc
Adriano Orru, bass, objects
Katrine Amsler, programming, edit

English version

In his autobiography, composer John Adams tells the grand finale of Grand Pianola Music: ‘It starts with a long and sustained seventh dominant chord throbbing and vibrating for sixty bars before flowing into a virtual Niagara of piano arpeggios. What follows is an absolutely familiar melody, a kind of Ur-Melodie. You think you’ve already heard it, but you can not remember where or when. It’s actually an original theme ‘[John Adams, Hallelujah Junction, EDT]. This passage came to my mind when I listened to Variety of Rhythm, a suite composed by the Swedish guitarist Samuel Hällkvist. A study of listening to rhythm and auditory perceptions, managed in a fashion similar way to the way we study visual illusions mechanisms, such as those painted on the cover. And that takes us into a world of archaeologies of sounds, at any moment we recognize Ur-Melodies – in this case more Ur-Rhythms– that we do not remember to remember, as in the case of the example of John Adams.

Variety of Rhythm is the fourth solo work by the Swedish-born, but Denmark-resident guitarist Samuel Hällkvist. It is also the third in the ‘Variety of’ series following Variety of Loud (2012) and Variety of Live (2015). Listening to his discography we can see a different direction, an experiment focusing on a different aspect comparing a record to the previous one. He uses a preferably clean guitar base, combining it along a work focused on rhythms and polyrhythms and developing melody and harmony in a way functional to the rhythmic development of the piece. He gives only a few solos and prefers to work on the structure of the pieces, using sounds ranging from the American jazz of Bill Frisell to math rock, Pink Floyd’s psychedelic, avant-garde, electronics, Asian music, complex progressive instrumental -never lavish, even sometimes subtly ironic, i.e. in style of Mats / Morgan Band. No surprise Samuel worked with Morgan Agren, as well as mentioning the collaborations, among others, with Pat MastelottoDavid Torn – who makes an appearance also in this work- and trumpeter Yazz Ahmed, whose Le Saboteuse was among the most interesting releases in 2017. And he is a regular member of the Swedish veteran proggers Isildurs Bane, who worked with Steve Hogarth last year for Colours Not Found in Nature.

For this work he assembled a team of 12 musicians and recorded parts of the suite between Scandinavia, Paris, Japan, Antwerp, Portugal and the United States. Each of the teams in the various locations (see below the tracklist) has a part of the total 43 minutes of the piece, which are developed without interruption in three main sections of written composition, developed in a structure of sonata-form of presentation/recapitulation and interspersed with improvised segments. The beginning of the first part, Double Adagio, is lead  by Qarin Wikström‘s vocals together with Meshuggah‘s Dick Lövgren basslines. They build the first ostinato on the beat of metronome brought by the vibraphone of Kumiko Takara, while drums adds the first polyrhythm. As Hällkvist describes in the Variety of site, which has been created to explain the piece’s musical analysis and its construction, we hear no more than three chords repeated for multiple beats while all the instruments dialogue between a rhythm of 3 and 7. We feel a dancing and cheerful gamelan, above which Hällkvist builds intense lines with guitar lead distortion full of reverberations up to four minutes, when drums stop for the last final intro chords.

Behind Variety of Rhythm there is a strong vision to guide the composition of this work, which is linked to the perception cognitive process. Gestalt psychology analyzed in depth the perception, placing it for the first time at the center of this discipline. In 1912, Max Wertheimer, while studying visual illusions, developed the concept of form, which represents the unitary organization of elements at cognitive level that our senses received individually. The perception scene is already full of the relationships between the elements we are sensing, such as in the experiment of two close lamps that turn on and off quickly: our eyes tends to perceive them as a single lamp. Our eye, as well as our ear, is able to grasp the interactions between the elements that occur outside the perceptions field. The visual example of this mental process is hinted by Hällkvist himself with the title of one of the main pieces, The Necker Cube, a figure created to work on the ambiguity of the cognitive illusion. Our senses collect more than what is in the sum of the individual parts.

Hällkvist follows this path to develop the relationship between the rhythms in his work. At any time the listening act rebounds like a rubber band between the various levels of the piece through a double circuit: on one hand the dialogue between the beats, meant as meters, on the other those between the rhythms, meant as complex constructions of accents and quotations of signs and cultural references. For example, in the short improvised interlude glued between the first movement and the second, Tete-a-tete / Blivet, which begins around 5 minutes, while not perceiving beats, the listener continues to bring the rhythm within him/herself while listening. Second part begins with a slow and psychedelic carpet on which Hällkvist’s guitar and Liesbeth Lambrecht‘s violin bring a theme out of phase that goes up and down between the higher and lower register. The drums comes out after about two minutes leaving room for delay guitar lines, using a well-known 1980s David Gilmour effect. He chooses a overused effect chosen by many guitarists, making a very risky move: instead, Samuel builds a relaxing and spatial moment. Pete Drungle‘s keyboards, bass and drums are coming back in creating a growing tension while moving through the whole chromatic scale. We are on a journey starting from Pink Floyd until the early Porcupine Tree. A moment worth the price of the ticket.

At the end of the part, vibraphone brings an obsessive theme on the same beat that we listened on the previous moments and we still feel in ourselves, then the following improvisation by David Torn builds an intense soundscape, which recalls the sounds of his last solo on ECM, Only Sky. The third part begins around 26 minutes like the previous one, with a few notes brought by the vibraphone dialoguing with the drums. This time music swings from quarters to triplets and it changes the underlying chord at each change of rhythm. The rhythms is slow while we hear all possible interactions between different patterns. When our ear focuses on the similitudes with minimalism, here there is a reminiscence of gamelan or a pentatonic referring to oriental music or prog rock or American folk.

Listening to Variety of Rhythm takes place at a level deeper than just listening. We perceive an underlying development of the song, hidden behind the the cognitive illusions. It is not a trick, but rather a real dialogue between the rhythms within the work, in which the listener takes an active part by finding new details for each listening.

Samuel Hällkvist

Variety of Rhythm

*DOUBLE ADAGIO : TJSP
A1 : TP
trio 1 clip 1: TEAM JAPAN
*TETE-A-TETE / BLIVET: TJSPA
trio 2 clip 1: TP
*huly marga : TU
B1: TP
improv 1 clip 3: TP
A2: TP
*THE NECKER CUBE: TJSPA
B2: TP
*part of ADAGIO DOUBLE: TJS
C2: TP
trio 1 clip 2: TJ
*part of TETE-A-TETE / BLIVET: TJSPA

Samuel Hällkvist, guitar
Dick Lövgren, bass
Qarin Wikström, voice
Knut Finsrud, drums
Liesbeth Lambrecht, violin
Pete Drungle, keys
David Torn, guitar
Yasuhiro Yoshigaki, drums
Kumiko Takara, vibraphone
Paulo Chagas, sax, flute
Silvia Corda, misc
Adriano Orru, bass, objects
Katrine Amsler, programming, edit

 

Slivovitz – LiveR [MoonJune 2018]

English version

Se chiedete a mia madre il suo attore preferito lei vi risponde Humphrey Bogart. ‘Ma non é bello’ ‘Si, ma é affascinante’. E poi vi fa una sfilza di attori belli che non ballano. Ecco, uso questa metafora per dire che un bel disco da studio seguito da un live non all’altezza, é un bello che non balla. Esempio che non si addice proprio a LiveR degli Slivovitz, visto che é un lavoro che balla un prog tiratissimo dal sapore di funk, incrociato tra tempi composti, groove aggressivi e melodie etniche.

Nati nel 2001 a Napoli, hanno alle spalle 5 album ed un’attività live consistente, oltre che una line-up ormai stabile. Partono da un jazz-rock anni ’70 con -appunto- prog, funk, scale che vanno dal balcanico all’arabo condite con sensibilità mediterranea, cantabili e inusuali allo stesso tempo. Ma via via col tempo amalgamano gli ingredienti, rendendo sempre più difficile separare le singole influenze all’interno del loro sound. Facile capire, vedendo input così diversi tra loro, perché dal secondo album vengano assoldati dallo zio d’america Leonardo Pavkovic, da sempre attratto agli incroci dal pedigree inimmaginabile per il catalogo MoonJune. Nell’ultimo lavoro del 2015, All You Can Eat, riescono a sintetizzare al meglio questo equilibrio tra la semplicità delle linee melodiche ed una complessità della scrittura, ben nascosta dal gran lavoro in studio in fase di arrangiamento. LiveR si compone di sette tracce, delle quali sei registrate a La Casa di Alex a Milano nel 2016. Riprende pezzi dai precedenti album declinandoli in un sound potente, viscerale diretto e coinvolgente. Una performance che gli Slivovitz hanno ripetuto con lo stesso impatto a Progressivamente a Roma a settembre di quest’anno.

Slivovitz, oltre ad essere –casualmente, lo diciamo- il nome di un’acquavite dell’Europa orientale, é una mezza via tra la big band ed un gruppo rock: la dimensione dei sette elementi, senza nessun pianoforte o tastiera, la chitarra di Marcello Giannini con soprattutto compiti ritmici, due fiati, ovvero il sax di Pietro Santangelo e la tromba di Ciro Riccardi, il violino di Riccardo Villari e l’armonica di Derek Di Perri. Completati dal basso di Vincenzo Lamagna, new entry nell’ultimo album, e dalla batteria di Salvatore Rainone.

E’ più facile il paragone con la big band, soprattutto in un momento in cui tanti ensembles richiamano tante influenze prog e jazz-rock -mi vengono in mente esempi più o meno vicini come Andromeda Mega Express Orchestra, Nathan Parker Smith, Hooffoot, Amoeba Split, Forgas Band Phenomena.

Ma grazie alla dimensione ristretta gli Slivovitz guadagnano in flessibilità ed interazione tra i vari elementi rispetto ad un ensemble più grandi. Così se state pensando alla fusion degli Snarky Puppy, qui si trova un prog molto più tirato -andatevi a sentire la coda di Cleopatra che diventa un vero rompicapo ritmico, quasi da math rock. E con un gran lavoro di incorporazione di influenze etniche.

Un live con un forte sound d’impatto -e per questo c’é da andarsi a sentire Negative Creep, pezzo storico di Bleach dei Nirvana, reso ancora più grezzo e tirato, se possibile. O la poderosa coda della iniziale Mai Per Comando che passa con nonchalanche dal metal al tema del chorus quasi ironico. La Egiziaca di LiveR é poi il perfetto esempio dell’anima della band: la tiratissima intro corale lascia spazio all’altrettanto tirato tema del riff orientale. Dopo un minuto e trenta l’atmosfera diventa improvvisamente rarefatta: un solo equilibratissimo della tromba di Riccardi, che cresce lentamente sospinto dall’interplay degli strumming nervosi di Giannini e dal dialogo della sezione ritmica: ci ritroviamo d’improvviso nel Miles Davis del periodo più acido e scuro dell’era elettrica, quello del periodo ’73-’75. La conclusione é un R&B con l’armonica di Di Perri a tirare la volata sul ritmo 4+5 conclusivo. Prima che il pezzo ritorni improvvisamente calmo e poi di nuovo potente.

Gli Slivovitz hanno una capacità di tirare e lasciare, gestire il groove che nella dimensione live viene fuori ancora più che su disco.  Dando più risalto alla chitarra di Giannini –vero e proprio deus ex machina che emerge nel live- alla potenza dei soli di Santangelo, come nel funk dal ritmo sbilenco di Currywurst: 5 minuti tiratissimi sui quali si esaltano i solisti, prima della eterea coda finale fatta dagli arpeggi della chitarra. Lo spazio rimane alle geometrie del violino di Villari, prima accennate poi sempre più delineate. Sotto sentiamo emergere il primo tema funk portato dai fiati e dall’armonica, spogliato di tutta la sua potenza, quasi un ricordo della potenza in nuce, che si ricompone nelle ultime battute. Uno dei momenti più esaltanti del live, anzi LiveR.

Slivovitz
LiveR

1. Mai Per Comando 05:41 (Giannini/Santangelo)
2. Cleopatra 07:37 (Santangelo)
3. Currywurst 07:53 (Giannini)
4. Egiziaca 08:30 (Santangelo)
5. Mani In Faccia 07:53 (Giannini)
6. Negative Creep 05:10 (Cobain)
7. Caldo Bagno 07:50 (Giannini/Manzo)

English version

When I ask my mother about her favorite actor, she answers Humphrey Bogart. ‘He is not handsome!’ ‘But he’s charming’. And then there is a slew of beautiful actors who are handsome, but not charming. This metaphor hints at a nice studio album followed by a live not standing for it, like an handsome actor, missing any charm. An example that does not suit Slivovitz‘s LiveR, a beautiful job that has charm as well with a very well-designed prog with a funk flavor, crossed by cross tempos, aggressive grooves and ethnic melodies.

Born in 2001 in Naples, they have 5 albums and a consistent live activity behing, as well as a stable line-up. They start from a 70s jazz-rock background mixed with prog, funk, oriental/balkan scales topped with Mediterranean sensibility, singable and unusual at the same time. But gradually as they mix the ingredients, it increases difficulty to separate the individual influences in their sound. Easy to expect, given so different inputs, that starting from the second album they began working with lo zio d’America Leonardo Pavkovic, always attracted to the strangest mixtures for the MoonJune catalog. In their latest recording album to date in 2015, All You Can Eat, they manage to summarize at best this balance between the simplicity of the melodic lines and a complexity of writing, well hidden by the great work in the studio during the arrangement.

LiveR includes seven tracks, six of which have been recorded at La Casa di Alex in Milan in 2016, choosing pieces from the previous albums and replaying them with a sound powerful and immediate. A performance that Slivovitz backed with same impact at Progressivamente in Rome in September this year.

Slivovitz, besides being –incidentally– the name of an alchool drink from Eastern Europe, is an half way between the big band and a rock band: the size of the seven elements, without any piano or keyboard, the guitar of Marcello Giannini with mainly rhythmic tasks, two winds, the saxophone of Pietro Santangelo and the trumpet by Ciro Riccardi, the violin by Riccardo Villari and the harmonica by Derek Di Perri. Rhythm section played by Vincenzo Lamagna at the bass, new entry in the last album, and Salvatore Rainone at the drums.

Comparing them with the big band line-up is easier, especially at a time when many ensembles recall so many prog and jazz-rock influences – some examples like Andromeda Mega Express Orchestra, Nathan Parker Smith, Hooffoot, Amoeba Split, Forgas Band Phenomena.

But due to the small size the Slivovitz gain in flexibility and interaction degree between the various elements in comparison to a larger ensemble. So if you are thinking about the Snarky Puppy, here is a much more powerful prog – check Cleopatra‘s coda that becomes a real rhythmic puzzle, almost math rock. And with a great job of incorporating ethnic influences.

A live with a strong impact sound – this time check Negative Creep, from Nirvana’s historical Bleach‘s, made even cruder and intense, if possible. Or the powerful code of the starting track Mai Per Comando that moves with nonchalanche from metal to the almost ironical main them theme. Egiziaca is the perfect example of the soul of the band: the very tight choral intro leaves space to the equally intense theme of the oriental main riff. After a minute and thirty the atmosphere suddenly becomes rarefied: a balanced solo by Riccardi‘s trumpet, which grows slowly, driven by Giannini‘s interweaving of nervous strumming and the dialogue of the rhythm section: we find ourselves suddenly in the Miles Davis of the most acid and dark of the electric age, the period ’73 -’75 era. The conclusion is a R & B with the harmonica of Di Perri to pull the sprint on the final 4 + 5 rhythm. Before the piece suddenly returns calm and then again powerful.

Slivovitz have the ability to pull and leave, to handle the groove that comes out even more than on the studio recording . Giving more prominence to Giannini’s guitar -real deus ex machina emerging in stage context- to the power of Santangelo‘s solos, as in the funk from the lopsided rhythm of Currywurst: 5 speeded up mins when soloists deliver exhilarating efforts, until guitar arpeggios unveil final coda. There is room for Villari‘s geometric lines on violin. Beneath we hear the initial funk theme played by brasses and harmonica, removed of all its initial violence, almost a remembrance of the potential power, which is finally unified in the ending bars. One of the most exhilarating moments of this live, better LiveR.

Slivovitz
LiveR

1. Mai Per Comando 05:41 (Giannini/Santangelo)
2. Cleopatra 07:37 (Santangelo)
3. Currywurst 07:53 (Giannini)
4. Egiziaca 08:30 (Santangelo)
5. Mani In Faccia 07:53 (Giannini)
6. Negative Creep 05:10 (Cobain)
7. Caldo Bagno 07:50 (Giannini/Manzo)

Lorenzo Feliciati – Elevator Man [RareNoise 2017]

ENG
Ascolta clip

Il primo piacere che coltivo, quando mi imbatto in un nuovo progetto di Lorenzo Feliciati, é scorrere la lista dei musicisti. La maggior parte delle volte sorrido pensando ad accostamenti di musicisti che ho amato in momenti diversi della mia vita, ma mai avrei pensato di sentirli all’interno della stessa discografia. Così capita di imbattersi nei ritmi angolari di Pat Mastelotto accanto alle linee delicate di Nils Petter Molvaer, nelle geniali soluzioni di batteria di Steve Jansen accanto ad solo estremo di Mattias IA Eklundh, nei paesaggi sonori di Eivind Aarset e subito dopo nel sound viscerale di Bob Mintzer. Prog, sound ECM, jazz norvegese, chitarra ipertecnica, fusion, elettronica. I me di 20 anni, di 25, di 30 e 35 tutti insieme nello stesso posto. Wow!

Elevator Man é il quarto album solista del bassista romano ed il terzo a firma della RareNoise di Giacomo Bruzzo. Un sodalizio che va avanti da anni attraverso progetti molto diversi tra loro. Si passa dall’heavy prog di uno dei migliori album del 2017, Tooth dei Mumpbeak, insieme al tastierista inglese, ma norgevese d’adozione, Roy Powell, che ritroviamo anche in un pezzo di Elevator Man. Prima c’erano stati l’esperimento Naked Truth tra prog, fusion ed elletronica con due mostri sacri dell’avanguardia come Graham Haynes alla tromba e Bill Laswell alla produzione, sempre Roy Powell e  la batteria di Pat Mastelotto; il duo tra ambient, rock ed elettronica di Twinscapes con il bassista ex-Porcupine Tree Colin Edwin; il potentissimo mix di prog e avant rock con la voce di Lorenzo Esposito Fornasari di Berserk! -scorrete in basso per sentire il sampler. Ed al di fuori dei progetti a suo nome seguire Lorenzo é ancora più difficile.

Elevator Man non può essere che un album piacevolmente eterogeneo, pieno di soluzioni che vanno a pescare da un arsenale di stili diversi l’uno dall’altro, un riff alla Weather Report seguito da un soundscape luminescente, poi una ritmica serrata in tempi dispari ed infine un jazz intimo e lirico. Un album che mantiene sempre una forte coesione, merito di un lavoro di scrittura in un tempo circoscritto, tre mesi, e di un grande lavoro di produzione. Un suono levigato da un gran lavoro di mixaggio e mastering insieme ad una scrittura piena di ‘ganci’ per l’ascolto e riff accattivanti. Andate a sentire l’apertura con il pezzo omonimo Elevator Man. Un basso pompatissimo fa da intro perfetta ad uno strumentale prog costruito su poche note che si muovono di semitoni sopra e sotto, creando una sfondo inquietante senza farci smettere di fare headbanging. Il basso colorato da poco effetto, ricco di groove. Il paragone che mi viene é con il Tony Levin di Sleepless, capace di fare le cose più complicate con poche note soltanto.

A differenza del precedente KOI, questa volta Lorenzo ha lavorato su un album non plasmato da un filo conduttore comune, da un concept di fondo. Alla formazione quasi stabile del precedente, ad esempio Steve Jansen quasi sempre alla batteria ed Alessandro Gwis al piano, qui si contrappone la scelta di formazioni diverse per ogni brano. Con il risultato che ognuno dei pezzi si plasma sui musicisti che ospita. Così Brick del trio Mumpbeak dà spazio al trio di fiati di Stan Adams, Pierluigi Bastioli e Duilio Ingrosso, compagni anche nell’Orchestra Operaia di Massimo Nunzi oltre che nel precedente disco solista. Il riff iniziale é molto più potente in questa versione che in quella contenuta in Tooth: su questo il tastierista inglese Roy Powel porta il suono lacerato del suo clavinet, effettato come una chitarra -uno dei segreti della bellezza dei Mumpbeak! Ed alla batteria un chirurgico Chad Wackerman.

Nel seguente 14 Stones, caratterizzato da una marcia funebre sbilenca, nulla sembra più naturale di sentire Pat Mastelotto accanto ad un Cuong Vu, che mantiene la calma anche nei momenti di maggiore frenesia del brano e lascia la tensione salire gradualmente. Mentre Alessandro Gwis, invece, si lascia andare in sottofondo ai confini del pezzo. Lorenzo Feliciati é lo scheletro del brano e non ha la minima smania di esibirsi, a conferma che Elevator Man non é un recital di basso elettrico, ma un album dove ogni pezzo sembra scritto per la sua specifica line-up.

Il soundscape onirico di Black Book, Red Letters sembra uscito da un album di Nils Petter Molvaer: il dialogo tra la tromba di Claudio Corvini ed il sax di Sandro Satta é pieno di lirismo e di delicatezza, fino all’estatica coda finale costruita su un accordo ripetuto all’estremo.

Lorenzo utilizza un sound abbastanza inconfondibile, sempre grosso e presente, mai infangato, colorato il giusto da chorus ed effetti: insomma, ascoltarlo é sempre un piacere. Jaco Pastorius é il punto di riferimento che lo ha spinto, dopo aver visto l’ultimo tour dei Weather Report con lui al basso a Roma nel 1980, ad imbracciare lo strumento. Influenza che sento tanto in questo suono sempre ricco di potenza, ma dolce e leggermente flautato. Ma anche in tanti fill dal sapore Weather Report sparsi nel disco.

Le influenze fusion anni ’80 sono ad esempio alla base del giro iniziale di Unchained Houdini (dove il suono secco scelto per il basso stavolta va a pescare dalla mia memoria tale Andy Ramirez, oscuro bassista sull’album Parallax del chitarrista Greg Howe!). Per poi proseguire in un tempo dispari decisamente heavy dal sapore più prog. Un disco che abbonda di cambi di tempo e di stile, come in Thief Like Me che si apre con una sezione pulsante new wave, per poi diventare funk. Quindi, Aidan Zammit costruisce una lunga progressione di cambi che non mettono minimamente a disagio Marco Sfogli, il quale libera un solo di gran mestiere e tiro. Prima di una outro zawinuliana.

Ancora decisamente prog é il 9/8 di apertura di S.O.S., con ancora un solo tiratissimo di uno shredder come Mattias IA Eklundh. A conferma che accanto a musicisti che lavorano meno sulla tecnica strumentale, non abbiamo il minimo problema a vedere Lorenzo accanto a chitarristi ipertecnici, come ad esempio Alessandro Benvenuti, con cui condivide un trio attualmente, oppure a Fabio Cerrone dei Virtual Dream, con i quali aveva suonato in una edizione precedente del festival prog romano Progressivamente.

Elevator Man sembra tutto fuorchè l’album di un musicista che vuole far vedere come sa suonare uno strumento.  La scrittura del disco é sempre sopra le parti, equilibra idee accattivanti accanto a soluzioni di ricerca, mescola sempre più stili contemporaneamente, stimola l’ascoltatore ad andare in più posti. Il tutto arrangiato ad altissimi livelli.

English version

Whenever I run into a new project by Lorenzo Feliciati , first thing I do is to dig into the list of musicians. And I smile thinking of combinations of musicians that I have loved in different moments of my life, but I would never have thought to hear them in the same context. So it happens to run into the angular rhythms of Pat Mastelotto next to the delicate lines of NilsPetter Molvaer , in the inventive drumming of Steve Jansen alongside only the extreme of Mattias IA Eklundh , in the soundscapes of Eivind Aarset and soon after in Bob Mintzer’s visceral voice . Prog, ECM sound, norwegian jazz, hyper-technical guitar, fusion, electronics. The myselfs of the 20s, of the 25s, of the 30s and the 35s all together in the same place. Wow!
Elevator Man is the fourth solo album of the roman bassist and the third one signed by Giacomo Bruzzo’s RareNoise . A partnership that has been going on for years through very different projects. It spans from Mumpbeaks’s Tooth heavy prog, easily one of best albums I’ve listened to in 2017, along with the Norgevese-but-English-born keyboard master Roy Powell, whom is also joining Elevator Man. Earlier appearing in Naked Truth’s mixture of prog, fusion and electronic with two sacred vanguard monsters like Graham Haynes on trumpet and Bill Laswell on production, joined again by Roy Powell and Pat Mastelotto’s drums; not to forget the twinscapes ambient, rock and electronic duo with former Porcupine bassist Colin Edwin; or the powerful mix of prog and avant rock with the voice of Lorenzo Esposito Fornasari on Berserk! – Scroll down to hear the sampler. And outside of the projects signed at his name, to follow Lorenzo is even more difficult.
Elevator Man is simply a pleasantly heterogeneous album, full of solutions that go to uncover from an arsenal of styles different from each other, a riff at the Weather Report followed by a luminescent soundscape, then a rhythm in odd times and finally, an then a lyrical jazz. An album that always maintains a strong cohesion, thanks to has been set up in a limited time, three months, and a great production work. A sound smoothed by a great job of mixing and mastering together with a writing full of ‘hooks’ for listening and catchy riffs. Go and hear the opening with the homonymous piece Elevator Man. A pumped bass makes perfect intro to an instrumental prog built on a few notes that move in semitones above and below, creating a disturbing background without making us stop headbanging. The low-colored bass effect, rich in groove. The comparison is easy with Tony Levin’s Sleepless and his skills to do the most with few.
Unlike the previous KOI , this time Lorenzo has worked on an album not shaped by a common thread, by a basic concept. The almost stable formation of the previous one, for example Steve Jansen almost always on drums and Alessandro Gwis on the piano, here contrasts with the choice of different formations for each piece. With the result that each piece is molded on the musicians it hosts. Thus Brick of the Mumpbeak trio gives space to the wind trio of Stan Adams , Pierluigi Bastioli and Duilio Ingrosso , comrades also in the Operaia Orchestra by Massimo Nunzi as well as on the previous solo album . The initial riff is much more powerful in this version than in the one contained in Tooth : on this the English keyboard player Roy Powel brings the lacerated sound of his clavinet, made like a guitar – one of the secrets of the beauty of Mumpbeak ! And to the battery a surgical ChadWackerman .
In the following 14 Stones , characterized by a lopsided funeral march, nothing seems more natural to feel Pat Mastelotto next to a Cuong Vu, which maintains calm even in the moments of greatest frenzy of the song and leaves the tension gradually rise. Whereas Alessandro Gwis , on the other hand, lets himself go in the background at the edge of the piece. Lorenzo Feliciati is the skeleton of the song and has not the slightest desire to perform, confirming that Elevator Man is not an electric bass recital, but an album where each piece seems written for its specific line-up.
The dreamlike soundscape of Black Book, Red Letters seems to come out from an album by Nils Petter Molvaer : the dialogue between the trumpet of ClaudioCorvini and the sax of Sandro Satta is full of lyricism and delicacy, until the final tail end built on a agreement repeated to the extreme.
Lorenzo uses a quite unmistakable sound, always big and present, never muddied, colored the right chorus and effects: in short, listening to it is always a pleasure.Jaco Pastorius is the reference point that pushed him, after seeing the last tour of the Weather Report with him at the bass in Rome in 1980, to take up the instrument. Influence I feel so much in this sound always full of power, but sweet and slightly fluted. But also in many fill with the Weather Report flavor scattered in the disc.
For example, the 80s fusion influences are at the base of the initial round of Unchained Houdini (where the dry sound chosen for the bass this time goes to draw from my memory such Andy Ramirez, obscure bassist on the Parallax album by guitarist Greg Howe !). And then continue in an odd, decidedly heavy time with more prog flavor. A disc that abounds with changes of time and style, as in Thief Like Me that opens with a new wave button section, and then becomes funk. So, Aidan Zammit builds a long progression of changes that do not put Marco Sfogliin the slightest discomfort , which frees one of a great craft and shot. Before a zawinuliana outro.
Still very prog is the 9/8 opening of SOS , with yet only one pullatissimo of a shredder like Mattias IA Eklundh . To confirm that next to musicians who work less on the instrumental technique, we do not have the slightest problem to see Lorenzo next to hyper-technical guitarists, such as Alessandro Benvenuti, with whom he shares a trio currently, or to Fabio Cerrone of Virtual Dream , with whom had played in a previous edition of the Roman prog festival Progressively .
Elevator Man seems anything but a musician’s album that wants to show how he can play an instrument. The writing of the disc is always above the parts, balances appealing ideas next to research solutions, it mixes more and more styles at the same time, it stimulates the listener to go in more places. All arranged at the highest levels.