Trio HLK – Standard Time [Ubuntu Music 2018]

Interview + review in August and September 2018

Italian version below

Two landmark experts of contemporary music like Alex Ross and Nate Chinen published at almost same time two stories connected by an hidden thread. The former beginning from the rapper Kendrick Lamar being awarded the Pulitzer prize, traditionally reserved to classical composers, to trigger a discussion on the status of contemporary classical music; the latter contextualizing a 2009 anecdote, the backfiring coming from Kurt Rosenwinkel in direction of Vijay Iyer as the pianist was awarded of a MacArthur grant. Apparently linked only by the fray between musical personalities theme, they are instead reflecting and discussing on a deeper level the relationship between tradition and any so-called avantgarde in music. Both of those resonated to me when meeting few days later with the groundbreaking Trio HLK, who just released their debut Standard Time. The title is a clear reference to standards and how to play them today, while in slightly different fashion, not exactly as a novice swing trio would. As Ant Law, one third of the trio on guitars, says it loud and clear the title is supposed to be a little provocative for us to say: this how you did it then, maybe we can do it like this now!

Not sure this is exactly the way an old school player would play Blue in Green or The Way You Look Tonight. Or at least hire the Edinburgh based trio to play jazz standards with. Even considering this trio seems to play everything, but jazz. Put an heavy usage of polyrhythms together with a jazz and classical background in a complex and inter knotted tapestry, driven by the connection of drummer Richard Kass, pianist Richard Harrold and guitarist Ant Law. The three are unloading a powerful mixture of subtle delicacy together with an inner strenght. A sort of djent jazz, or maybe contemporary polyrhythmic music, or maybe a math rock bop. Everything in Standard Time is around the rhythm. It is obviously the most primal thing. Any human being kind of experience, from the first sensation of your heartbeat of your mother’s heartbeat when being in the womb, the polyrhythm of the two heartbeats tells Ant LawStill this element is merely a starting point. They are not focusing on rhythm as a mean for itself. Instead as a direction to the true core of their search, which is the perception of the rhythm. Compositionally a lot of the tunes kind of play around with the perception of time, the perception of rhythm. A lot of things are kind of being stretched. A bit that might be conventionally, might be distorted to stretch the rhythm to compress the rhythm, about playing around with the perception of time, says Richard Harrold.

The title Standard Time is supposed to be a little provocative for us to say: this how you did it then, maybe we can do it like this now!

Trio HLK was born when Richard Kass and Richard Harrold met in Edinburgh and started developing a commong ground for a polyrhythmic exploration. As they were wanting to work as a trio, and looking to unconventionally fit the last third of the line-up with a guitarist, they met Ant Law on 2015 new year’s eve and decided to play together. If new years’s day good intentions for upcoming year are never the basis of something concrete -losing weight plans?, this is evidently the exception that proves the rule. Richard Kass remembers how they transitioned from a duo to a trio based line-up: we just started playing together and Richard Harrold had some musics he’d written and I liked that. There was some stuff in there which I’d start to get into, some micro rhythmical ideas which were kind of aligned with things I was interested and I was kind of really into. We sort of had a couple of other people as third members, which I didn’t feel they worked out. We thought of Ant because I’ve met Ant a while ago. I didn’t know him well, but I was aware of the music he was doing, it was very rhythmical, it contained the same information in some of pieces we were working on. The three of them followed-up that day and they started rehearsing, practicing extensively, constantly structuring and de-structuring their music. A mixture of classically-influenced-meets-jazz -no wonder Harrold, who’s the main composer of the material, studied composition at London’s Royal Academy of Music and then at Yale School of Music in US. Putting all their influences in a bucket, they range from an extreme to another: from classical composer Elliott Carter to the influencing Swedish death metal band Meshuggah, from Armenian pianist Tigran Hamasyan to senior jazz icon Steve Coleman. And finally those influences are kind of secondary, in comparison to rhythmic exploration for itself. Says Richard Kassone thing that unites us is that we are all influenced in rhythm. It’s all music which is very involved in rhythm all being a slightly different context. We are very interested in contemporary classical music, jazz, lots of other music, folk music from certain parts of the world. Everything which is very heavy on rhythmic language. We are very passionate about.

None of the pieces in Standard Time can be considered a replication of a standard. Still each is borrowing something from a jazz standard or a popular jazz lick. Starting from first track Smalls, it is quite impossible to unravel the thread the band indicates between it and Blue in Green. The evocative descending line that Bill Evans painted at opening for Miles Davis‘s barely delicate trumpet is almost echoed by Harrold‘s descending piano main theme. But listening to intricate mute cymbal riff on the opening, is not quite as Jimmy Cobb would have played it. Steve Lehman adds reverbered echoes played in a fortissimo and brings the track in the area of a sort of tribal flavor, while Ant Law puts the things immediately in a certain direction adding a distorted single note Meshuggah-like polyrhythmic pattern on the lower register. When approaching first solo, still the rhythmic pattern remains ambiguous and impossible to interpret. Piano solo enters in balancing jazz and classically influences with melodicity and clever rhythmic patterns: but the it is quite impossible to keep attention away from the interaction between the dynamic melodies expressed by piano and the crazy meters played by the rhythmic side, as Ant Law plays the lower strings of the 8-stringed guitar almost like a bass would.

Steve Lehman, who guests second solo, is really not a new for such intricate environments. He feels well at his ease like he did in his Demian as Posthuman or latest Selebeyone, or when playing aside Vijay Iyer in his most recent and celebrated sextet. Richard Harrold says about Steve LehmanI found very interesting to collaborate with people who have very unique voice and very unique approach. Steve for me is definitely one of those people. I almost thought he really not being as a sax player, even though he is of course a sax player. He doesn’t really play like a sax player in a conventional way. He’s got a very distinctive tone, he’s got a very distinctive language, harmonically, melodically if you want to call it melodically I wouldn’t say ideally melodic in the way he approaches music in general just in term of his rhythmic approach and harmonic approach. Also Ant Law acknowledges the importance of adding a musician such as him: who are the players who are working with this deep rhythmic music? probably 9 or 10 living people. Steve Lehman, David Binney, maybe Chris Potter, maybe Mark Shim, maybe Greg Osby, Steve Coleman of course. But Steve Lehman is the only one who’s interested in contemporary classical music. Adding groove, slowing down patterns, playing with subtle delicacy or tenderness out of the impressive machinery of the underlying codes, he seems always to reveal hidden rhythms in the rhythms themselves.

In the middle part of track Law and Harrold bring back the descending cadence of the main theme and put it in a sort of out of phase question and answer between them, a chaotic spiral free fall. The ending coda is even more ferocious with quiet and loud moments driven by the heavy-distorted guitar. It might sound like what Richard Harrold is doing is out of time -says Ant Law, but sometimes the rhythm structural cycle is so complex, that it actually sounds you can’t hear what’s going on. But usually there is some underlying pulse there. That’s one of the reasons it takes so long to learn because most of music is in 4 or 3. But here we have the solo section in the piece Smalls, where does it go… 3 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 and then something like that again. The whole thing is like maybe a 111 beats long before it repeats! So if your ear is searching for it, it sounds random. Of course it is not random, we are all playing very precisely together. That’s one of the effects I think it is important to hear. Sometimes it seems to be chaotic or very abstract but yeah we are playing together.

Trio HLK / Shoreditch / Shot by Rob Blackham / www.blackhamimages.com

Reworking and devouring their pieces until a final disruption, this is the practice of this trio, often blurring the lines between what’s written and what’s improvised. I want there to be a pattern that is recognizable that is then distorted or disrupted a lot of the time -explains Harrold. Not the case in all pieces, just thinking in a general sort of sense. For me generally when I am listening to music that I really like, I like to be in a song that I can follow, a song that I can latch onto it, but also a song that gives me surprises and stays interesting. If things get a bit too repetitive, a bit too predictable, then I lose interestInterestingly they started their disrupting practice from Blue in Green, which was already ahead of its time. Ted Gioia writes about this track: the casual listener could be forgiven for thinking that the work is just a free-form improvisation, without clear beginning or end [Ted Gioia, The Jazz Standards]. Their practice of disrupting the music goes often in direction of exploring the listener’s perception work. There aren’t a lot of polyrhythmic music will often set up two or three rhythmic patterns and just let them play out and finally allow them to synch and then go out of synch -says Harrold. A lot of time when I am working with those things I like to disrupt them once they become unpredictable. That’s really my own perception whether that’s predictable or not, but maybe set two things in opposition for a short while and then play with them a little bit so they are no longer predictable and allow them to become predictable again. That process is often quite intuitive. That’s just my own playing through things a lot. Tapping through them, taking things out, putting things back in until I reach a point where I am happy with how predictable is versus how unpredictable is. It’s quite normal, quite an organic process of numeric patterns that work together and then there’s an human element of disruption that goes in there as well.

There are probably some other people out there technically accomplished that can do that, but they might not have such a vision of what they want to do when they are giving this music what they can bring to says Richard Kass about the guesting musicians in Standard TimeDame Evelyn Glennie has become a steady partner with the trio after the recording, siding them even in a the extensive UK tour they had after the release date. Being a percussion icon in the classical and avantgarde work, her partnership did not add just visibility to the trio effort, but impressed a landmark on the tracks. As Richard Harrold regarding her: she’s done so many really really improvisational projects, but she is just for me completely different approach. She doesn’t come from that kind of strict rhythmic improvisatory background, but she has this incredible palette, this incredible orchestral sense. And the interaction is even increasing during the tour, as the tracks, so intricate and heavily composed, show how flexible they can ben in terms of live rendition. Ant Law indicates that the effort by the vibraphonist guest shows how the band is still in the learning curve: it’s funny that we are playing more live gigs with Eveyln Glennie, she starts to do more and more crazy things that she didn’t do on the album. I feel excited, I kind of wish we could go back and record. But I am excited we can do now that we know what we can do. Now that we know what she can do, she knows what is welcome, she becomes more bold with each gig. 

Starting with an improvisation around what will be the opening chord of second track Extra Sensory Perception, piano and vibraphone create a dreamy and shiny environment. They are playing mainly with chord extensions, adding slowly an increased speed with upward scales. When we reach the opening section, a descending cadence enters in: again a Miles Davis track is referenced here, this time the Wayne Shorter composed E.S.P. While the original was a masterpiece of fluid movement, of smoother transitions that mimick a sort of city traffic, the three here borrow only with the initial bars of the theme and stretch/enlarge it at their own will during the whole piece. Glennie‘s solo progressively accelerates: she is playing around overlapping rhythms, seemingly following an hidden mathematical proportion between each of them, like she’s moving through a secret Fibonacci-sequence ladder. Next is the angular and dissected solo by Ant Law, who places himself in a delicate balance between a crazy shredder attitude and a warm soothing jazz tone. Again the initial theme is brought in while the trio + one moves up and down the accelerating throttle, playing with listener’s expectations through an ever changing riddle, as the score shows here. Richard Kass‘s role is not merely being the driver of the rhythm, while more regarded as solo player with special duties: often I am trying to look at what information is already present in the composition and work out either. As Ant would say how to unify some of the rhythms that have been composed. Sometimes I am trying mark out the meters and then play around or on on top of them or across of them. What I find most useful is to cause tension and release by playing across the bar or across the meter and then resolving it at somewhere. So sometimes when it happens, you have this as Richard Harrold called it, two things fighting, two patterns going on at the same time and some point they come back around. For me the effect of that is a tension and  then a release. And for some listeners perception of what one of these is the time and which one is the other rhythm that I kind of play along.

I take things out, put things back in until I reach a point where I am happy with how predictable is versus how unpredictable is.

Being based in a city like Edinburgh played a key role in the development of their sound. An ideal environment for cross-pollination as well as for allowing things slowly grow through practice, like Law mentions: It can be more difficult in London or somewhere in New York, because people are so frantically busy just running around. While London is the center of the new celebrated British jazz, the three seem to move sideways and to take time to let things ferment. So Jazz Bar, Edinburgh’s main venue for jazz music, acted like an hub and magnet for local jazz artistis. Ant Law is probably the one of three who gained most exposure so far. With two albums at his own name and a third to be released in November 2018 for Edition Records, he has already garnered the attention of many British musicians. The longtime collaboration with saxophonist Tim Garland was also a showcase of his abilities, including the participation on acclaimed 2016 effort One. This time he retains his usual mathematical approach to rhythm and incorporates the drier and wicked sound of his Schecter customized 8-strings guitar: when I was young I was looking at how many strings can you have on a guitar? 6-7-8 strings!? and then [when entering Trio HLK] I finally thought ‘The band doesn’t have bass, I am buying it!’ So I bought the 8-strings and I thought ‘Oh god!’. Still today we are practicing and I find it very difficult, sometimes I get lost in the extra strings I confuse. It is so unusual to see this instrument in a jazz line-up, more familiar in djent bands such as Animals as Leaders; but in a moment that metal is gaining more and more attention among jazz players –Jamie Saft & Bobby Previte‘s Doom Jazz, Dan Weiss‘s Starebaby, Tigra Hamasyan‘s Mockroot or Matt Mitchell‘s A Pouting Grimace to name few- this should not be a surprise.

A long solo intro by Steve Lehman breaks the frantic mood, but still prepares for another rhythmic battle in the approaching painS. The track starts with the dialogue between two swinged chords and an intricated proggy riff until they land to the main theme: the opening descending chord of Chick Corea‘s Spain is here the only fathomable element that hints at the jazz standard, as we move forward in the intricate interpolation of rhythms and counterpoint. Piano adds more bass and often duplicates guitar’s fatty lines -to mention that Harrold is using a Moog in live context- while Lehman explores creepy and angry melodies. Each section of the piece is a study in rhythmology for itself: exploring juxtapositions, shiftings, secret relationships until the thread that unites it all is barely visible. Dux is opened by a distorted cuban-like rhythm by Richard Kass -like a son drum kit played by Don Caballero– that piano echoes with the movement in parallel octaves typical in the music from the American island. Richard Harrold‘s solo is linked by an invisible thread with the rest of the band, making it impossible to understand where writing ends and improvisation begins. If you take a seat at one of our shows, there will be a percentage of 60% written 40% improvised, says Richard Kass, while Richard Harrold adds: Some of the sections, that the one you got there, have a kind of rhythmic structure that one actually has even chord symbols, so that’s more of a kind of a traditional jazz approach to improvisation. Some of the other forms are similar but with more complicated rhythms. we have for instance a 12 bar structure that has changing meters but with specific harmonic chord changes. It is hard to discern whether this is an improvised section. Some of the other pieces have sections that are for example a full bar rhythmic clue, there’s open free improvisation where this kind of rhythmic pattern is independent

They are working to produce new music for second album and in bringing new standards re-alive. Be prepared for Charlie Parker‘s Anthropology: it will be“Anthropometricks” and it will be on our next album. It is a monster – 10 pages of music with two solos! Following a clear vision, applying a different approach, working at a slower pace and cross-pollinating their influences seem to be the ground rules at the basis of Trio HLK. While their music is a parade of mathematical thinking and disrupting practices, still it is full of beauty, instinct, improvisation and immediacy, for how strange it might sound. This is the secret behind a band that is hopefully just at the starting point of their learning curve.

Trio HLK
Standard Time

1.Smalls (feat. Steve Lehman) 10:36
2.Extra Sensory Perception part i (feat. Evelyn Glennie) 03:50
3.Extra Sensory Perception part ii (feat. Evelyn Glennie) 06:51
4.painS part i (feat. Steve Lehman) 01:50
5.painS part ii (feat. Steve Lehman) 08:23
6.Twilt 08:37
7.Dux 08:24
8.Chewy 04:35
9.Stabvest 05:11
10.The Jig (feat. Evelyn Glennie) 08:13

Steve Lehman- Alto Sax
Evelyn Glennie- Vibraphone and Marimba
Rich Harrold- Piano
Ant Law- 8-string Guitar and effects
Richard Kass- Drums and percussion

http://www.triohlk.com

Versione in italiano

Due personalità di spicco della critica musicale come Alex Ross Nate Chinen hanno pubblicato, quasi contemporaneamente, due storie che sono collegate da un filo rosso: il primo parte dal rapper Kendrick Lamar che ha ricevuto il premio Pulitzer, tradizionalmente riservato ai compositori classici, per discutere lo stato della musica classica contemporanea; il secondo contestualizza un aneddoto del 2009, la polemica innescata da Kurt Rosenwinkel nei confronti di Vijay Iyer, che era stato insignito di un prestigioso premio alla MacArthur. Apparentemente legati solo dal tema della rissa tra personalità musicali, i due articoli invece riflettono e discutono ad un livello più profondo il rapporto tra tradizione e qualsiasi cosiddetta avanguardia nella musica. Entrambi mi sono rivenuti in mente quando ho incontrato alcuni giorni dopo i musicist del Trio HLK, che ha appena sfornato il debutto Standard Time. Un disco dove gli standards non vengono propriamente reinterpretati come farebbe un trio swing al primo disco, ma decisamente in una maniera più moderna. Come dice Ant Law, un terzo del trio alle chitarre, riferendosi ai musicisti della vecchia scuola, il titolo dovrebbe essere un po’ ‘provocatorio, come dire’ Dai, amico ‘. Questo non è uno standard! ora lo devi suonare così!

Ora, che un musicista della vecchia guardia possa avere il coraggio di suonare gli standards in questa maniera, o che decida di farsi accompagnare dal trio di Edimburgo, sembra improbabile. Anche considerando il fatto che i tre sembrano suonare tutto, fuorché jazz. Mettiamo insieme un uso intensivo di poliritmie all’interno di un contesto sia jazz che classico, un panorama fatto di linee complesse ed interconnesse, guidato dal batterista Richard Kass, dal pianista Richard Harrold e dal chitarrista Ant Law. I tre portano alla luce una potente miscela fatta di sottile delicatezza insieme ad una forza che si sprigiona in maniera dirompente dalle viscere. Una sorta di djent jazz, magari etichettabile come musica poliritmica contemporanea, o forse come math rock bop. Tutto in Standard Time parla del ritmo. È la cosa più primitiva. Qualsiasi tipo di esperienza umana, dalla prima sensazione del battito cardiaco della madre quando si è nel grembo materno, è la poliritmia dei due battiti del cuore dice Ant Law. Tuttavia questo elemento è solo un punto di partenza. Non si concentrano sul ritmo come mezzo di per se. Piuttosto come una direzione verso il vero nucleo vero e proprio della loro ricerca, che è la percezione del ritmo dell’ascoltatore. A livello compositivo molti dei pezzi giocano con la percezione del tempo, con la percezione del ritmo. Molte cose sono come allungate. In maniera convenzionale potrebbero suonare distorte allo scopo di allungare il ritmo e di comprimere il ritmo, di giocare con la percezione del tempo, dice Richard Harrold.

Il titolo Standard Time dovrebbe essere un po’ ‘provocatorio, come dire’ Dai, amico ‘. Questo non è uno standard! ora lo devi suonare così!

Il Trio HLK nasce quando Richard Kass e Richard Harrold si  incontrano ad Edimburgo e iniziamo a sviluppare un terreno comune allo scopo di esplorare le poliritmie. Vogliono lavorare come trio, e cercano di aggiungere un terzo membro non convenzionale alla loro line-up. Quindi incontrano il chitarrista Ant Law nel 2015, la sera di capodanno e decidono di suonare insieme. Se fare una lista di buone intenzioni per il prossimo anno al primo dell’anno non é mai la base per qualcosa di concreto – mettersi a dieta?, questo è evidentemente l’eccezione che conferma la regola. Richard Kass ricorda come é avvenuto il passaggio da duo a trio: avevamo appena iniziato a suonare insieme e Richard Harrold aveva dei pezzi che aveva scritto e mi piacevano. C’erano alcune cose con cui avrei iniziato a sperimentare, alcune idee micro ritmiche che erano un po’ allineate con le cose che mi interessavano e che mi piacevano davvero. Abbiamo suonato per un certo periodo come trio, ma non ritenevo che i membri che si avvicendavano fossero la soluzione ideale. Abbiamo pensato ad Ant perché l’avevo incontrato poco prima. Non lo conoscevo bene, ma ero a conoscenza della musica che stava facendo, che era molto ritmata e che conteneva le stesse linee di alcuni dei pezzi su cui stavamo lavorando. I tre danno seguito ai propositi del primo dell’anno ed inizano a provare, a esercitarsi a lungo, a strutturare e destrutturare costantemente la loro musica. Una miscela di influenze a caval\o tra classica e jazz – Harrold, che è il principale compositore del materiale, abbia studiato composizione alla Royal Academy of Music di Londra e poi alla Yale School of Music negli Stati Uniti. Mettendo insieme tutte le loro influenze, andremmo da un estremo all’altro: dal compositore classico Elliott Carter al gruppo death metal svedese Meshuggah, dal pianista armeno Tigran Hamasyan al maestro del poliritmie nel jazz  Steve Coleman. E infine quelle influenze stesse sono in un certo senso secondarie, in confronto all’esplorazione ritmica. Dice Richard Kass: una cosa che ci unisce è che siamo tutti influenzati dal ritmo. È tutta la musica che è molto caratterizzata dal ritmo, essendo tutti un contesto diverso l’uno dall’altro. Siamo molto interessati alla musica classica contemporanea, al jazz, a molta altra musica, alla musica etnica di alcune parti del mondo. Tutto ciò ha un peso forte su come viene trattato il ritmo. 

Nessuno dei pezzi di Standard Time può essere considerato una rilettura vera e propria di uno standard. Eppure ognuno prende qualcosa in prestito da uno standard jazz ben preciso o da una tema jazz. Partendo dalla prima traccia Smalls, è abbastanza difficile arrivare a scoprire il legame tra questo pezzo e Blue in Green. La suggestiva linea discendente che Bill Evans ha dipinto all’apertura della traccia di Kind of Blue per la tromba delicatamente accennata di Miles Davis quasi riecheggia nel tema discendente del pianoforte di Harrold. Ma ad ascoltare l’intricato riff sui piatti in muto dell’intro, non è esattamente come ascoltare Jimmy Cobb. Steve Lehman aggiunge echi riverberati, che vengono suonati in fortissimo, e porta nel pezzo una sorta di sapore tribale, mentre Ant Law mette le cose immediatamente in chiaro aggiungendo un pattern poliritmico e distorto, tipico dei Meshuggah, con una singola nota nel registro basso. Quando ci si avvicina al primo assolo, il pattern ritmico rimane ambiguo e impossibile da decifrare. Il solo di piano entra in una sorta di bilanciamento tra scale jazz e influenze classiche, suonato con melodicità ed intelligenza nella scelte ritmica delle frasi: ma è abbastanza impossibile tenere l’attenzione lontana dall’interazione tra la dinmicità del piano ed i metri da mal di testa della sezione ritmica, con Ant Law che suona le corde basse dell’chitarra ad 8 corde quasi come fosse un basso.

Steve Lehman, che ospita il secondo solo, non è nuovo a strutture così complesse. Si sente a suo agio in questi contesti come più volte ha fatto nella sua carriera, come ad esempio in Demian as Posthuman o nell’ultimo album a suo nome Selebeyone, o nel suonare accanto a Vijay Iyer nella sua  recente e celebrata formazione. Richard Harrold dice di Steve Lehman: ho trovato molto interessante a collaborare con persone che hanno una voce e un approccio davvero unico. Steve per me è sicuramente una di quelle persone. Ho quasi pensato che non fosse un sassofonista, anche se ovviamente è un sassofonista. In realtà non suona come un sassonista in modo convenzionale. Ha un tono molto particolare, ha un linguaggio molto particolare, armonicamente, melodicamente, se si può chiarmarlo melodico in realtà. E non direi che é proprio melodico nel modo in cui si avvicina alla musica, in generale, in termini di approccio ritmico e approccio armonico. Anche Ant Law riconosce l’importanza di aggiungere un musicista come lui: chi può andare a scavare in profondità in questa musica così ricca a livello ritmico? probabilmente 9 o 10 persone viventi, forse. Steve Lehman, forse David Binney, forse Chris Potter, forse Mark Shim, forse Greg Osby, Steve Coleman, naturalmente. Ma Steve Lehman è l’unico che si interessa anche alla musica classica contemporanea. Aggiungendo groove, rallentando i pattern, giocando con sottile delicatezza o sottigliezza all’esterno dell’imponente meccanismo delle strutture sottostanti, sembra sempre capace di rivelare ritmi nascosti all’interno dei ritmi stessi.

Nella parte centrale della traccia Law e Harrold riportano la cadenza discendente del tema principale e lo mettono in una sorta di botta e risposta fuori fase tra di loro, quasi una caduta libera a spirale. La coda finale è ancora più feroce con momenti tranquilli ed altri assordanti guidati dalla chitarra pesantemente distorta. Potrebbe sembrare che ciò che Richard Harrold sta facendo sia fuori dalla ritmica – dice Ant Law, ma a volte il ciclo strutturale del ritmo è così complesso, che sembra davvero che tu non possa sentire cosa sta succedendo. Eppure di solito c’è un impulso lì sotto. Questo è uno dei motivi per cui ci vuole così tanto tempo per impararla, perché la maggior parte della musica è in 4 o 3. Per esempio la sezione del solo in Smalls, dove si va in… 3 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 e poi qualcosa di simile. Credo che siano 111 battute prima che si ripeta la sezione! Quindi, se il tuo orecchio sta cercando di capirci qualcosa, ti sembra in realtà casuale. Ovviamente non è casuale, stiamo suonando tutti molto precisamente insieme. Questo è uno degli effetti che penso sia importante sentire. A volte sembra essere caotico o molto astratto ma sì, stiamo suonando insieme.

Trio HLK / Shoreditch / Shot by Rob Blackham / www.blackhamimages.com

Rielaborare e divorare i loro pezzi fino ad una distruzione finale, questa è ciò che il trio fa, spesso confondendo i piani tra ciò che è scritto e ciò che è improvvisato. Voglio che ci sia uno schema riconoscibile che viene poi distorto o distrutto per un certo tempo – spiega Harrold. Non avviene in tutti i pezzi, solo come regola di fondo. Per me, in generale, quando ascolto musica che mi piace, voglio entrare in un pezzo che posso seguire, un pezzo al quale mi posso attaccare, ma anche un pezzo che mi dà sorprese e rimane interessante. Se le cose diventano un po troppo ripetitive, un po’ troppo prevedibili, allora perdo interesse. È interessante notare che hanno iniziato la loro pratica distruttiva da uno statndard come Blue in Green che già conteneva forti segni di cambiamento rispetto al passato. Tanto che Ted Gioia ne ha scritto in questa maniera: l’ascoltatore occasionale potrebbe essere perdonato nel pensare che il lavoro sia solo un’improvvisazione in forma libera, senza un chiaro inizio o fine [Ted Gioia, The Jazz Standards]. La loro pratica di dsitruggere la musica cerca spesso di esplorare il lavoro di percezione dell’ascoltatore. Non c’è  molta musica poliritmica che spesso stabilisce due pattern ritmici o tre pattern e li lascia solo suonare e possono tornare a sincronizzarsi e quindi andare fuori sincrono – dice Harrold. Quando lavoro per un sacco di tempo con queste cose, mi piace disturbarle fino a farle diventate imprevedibili. Dipende dal modo in cui lo percepisco, che sia prevedibile o meno. Ma metti due cose in opposizione per un breve periodo e poi giochi un po’ con loro, in modo che non siano più prevedibili e permetti loro di diventare nuovamente prevedibili. Questo avviene spesso in maniera abbastanza intuitiva. E’ solo il mio modo di suonare. Entrarci dentro, estrapolarle, rimettere le cose in una maniera precisa, fino a raggiungere un punto in cui sono contento di quanto sia prevedibili rispetto a quanto siano imprevedibili. È abbastanza normale, é un processo organico fatto di schemi numerici che funzionano insieme, ma c’è anche un elemento umano di distruzione che entra in gioco.

Probabilmente ci sono altri musicisti che tecnicamente potrebbero riuscire a farlo, ma non avrebbero la visione di quello che vogliono fare quando suonano questa musica e di quello che possono portare in dote dice Richard Kass a proposito degli ospiti in Standard Time. Evelyn Glennie è diventata una partner stabile del trio dopo le sessioni di registrazione, aggiungendosi anche durante l’ampio tour del Regno Unito. Da icona del percussione nel mondo classico e d’avanguardia, la sua collaborazione non ha aggiunto solo visibilità al lavoro, ma ha lasciato un segno preciso sulle traccie. Come Richard Harrold dice a suo riguardo: ha fatto parte di davvero tanti progetti di improvvisazione, ma per me ha un approccio completamente diverso. Non viene da quel tipo di rigoroso background ritmico di improvvisazione. Ha questa incredibile tavolozza, questo incredibile senso orchestrale. E l’interazione é andata crescendo durante il tour, tanto che le tracce, così complesse e apparentemente solidamente composte, mostrano quanto possano essere flessibili in contesto live. Ant Law dice che l’appporto della vibrafonista mostra come la band sia ancora nella curva di apprendimento: è divertente ora che stiamo suonando più live con Eveyln Glennie e lei inizia a fare cose sempre più pazze che non ha fatto su l’album. Sono emozionato, vorrei poter tornare e registrare di nuovo. Ma sono eccitato di ciò che possiamo fare ora che sappiamo cosa possiamo fare. Ora che sappiamo cosa può fare lei, che sa fin dove si può spingere, diventa sempre più audace ad ogni concerto.

A partire da un’improvvisazione attorno a quello che sarà l’accordo di apertura della seconda traccia Extra Sensory Perception, il pianoforte e il vibrafono creano un ambiente sognante e brillante. Suonano principalmente sulle estensioni degli accordi, aggiungendo lentamente una maggiore velocità attraverso scale ascendenti. Quando raggiungiamo la sezione di apertura, entra una cadenza discendente: di nuovo qui si fa riferimento a una traccia di Miles Davis, questa volta composta da Wayne Shorter, ovvero E.S.P. Mentre l’originale era un capolavoro di movimento fluido, di transizioni più melliflue che imitano una sorta di traffico cittadino, i tre qui prendono in prestito solo le battute iniziali del tema e lo allungano / ingrandiscono a loro piacimento durante l’intero pezzo. L’assolo di Glennie accelera progressivamente: suona a cavallo di ritmi sovrapposti, apparentemente seguendo una proporzione matematica nascosta tra ognuno di essi, come se si stesse muovendo attraverso una scala segreta della sequenza di Fibonacci. Segue l’assolo angoloso e dissezionato di Ant Law, che si posiziona in equilibrio tra un sound forsennato da shredder e un tono caldo da smooth jazz. Ancora una volta il tema iniziale viene introdotto mentre il trio + uno si muove su e giù accelerando sul gas, giocando con le aspettative dell’ascoltatore come un enigma sonoro in continua evoluzione. Il ruolo di Richard Kass non è solo essere di principale motore del ritmo, ma ad un certo punto più di solista con compiti speciali: spesso cerco di vedere quali informazioni sono già presenti nella composizione e adattarmi di conseguenza. Come direbbe Ant allo scopo di unificare alcuni dei ritmi che sono stati composti. A volte provo a seguire la linea metrica e poi a giocare sopra o attraverso o insieme ai ritmi. Quello che trovo utile è di imprimere tensione e rilascio giocando attraverso la battuta o attraverso lo strumento e poi risolvere da qualche parte. Così, a volte, quando succede, hai due oggetti contrapposti, due schemi che sono in corso nello stesso tempo e un punto in cui tornano indietro. Per me l’effetto è prima di tensione e poi di liberazione. E per alcuni ascoltatori la percezione di qual’é il tempo e qual’è il ritmo é differente, é con questo che mi piace giocare.

Prendo qualcosa, la giro e la rigiro fino a che non raggiungo un punto nel quale sono felice con la maniera in cui prevedibile ed imprevedibile dialogano.

Essere basati in una città come Edimburgo ha avuto un ruolo chiave nello sviluppo del loro suono. Un ambiente ideale per le influenze incrociate e per permettere che il sound crescesse lentamente attraverso le prove, come dice Law: non penso sia possibile da qualche parte a Londra o da qualche parte a New York, perché le persone sono così freneticamente impegnate a correre intorno a tutto senza risparmiare tempo per nient’altro. Mentre Londra è il centro del nuovo celebre jazz britannico, i tre sembrano muoversi lateralmente e prendere tempo per lasciare che le cose fermentino altrove. Il Jazz Bar, il principale attrattore del jazz ad Edimburgo, ha funzionato come posto di ritrovo e calamita per artisti locali. Ant Law è probabilmente quello dei tre che ha ottenuto maggior esposizione finora. Con due album a suo nome e un terzo da pubblicare nel novembre 2018 per Edition Records, ha già attirato l’attenzione di molti musicisti britannici. La collaborazione con il sassofonista Tim Garland è stata una dimostrazione delle sue capacità, inclusa la partecipazione all’album del 2016 One che ha ricevuto molta attenzione. Questa volta mantiene il suo abituale approccio matematico al ritmo e incorpora il suono più secco e cattivo della sua chitarra a 8 corde Schecter customizzata: quando ero giovane osservavo quante corde si poteva avere su una chitarra? 6-7-8 corde!? e poi [quando sono entrato nel Trio HLK] alla fine ho pensato ‘La band non ha il basso, la compro!’ Così ho comprato la 8 corde e ho pensato ‘Oh dio!’. Ancora oggi ci stiamo esercitando e la trovo molto difficile, a volte mi perdo nelle corde aggiuntive, mi confondono. È così inusuale vedere questo strumento in una formazione jazzistica, più familiare in gruppi di djent come Animals as Leaders; ma in un momento in cui il metal sta guadagnando sempre più attenzione tra i jazzisti – Jamie Saft e Bobby Previte con Doom Jazz, Starebaby di Dan Weiss, Mockroot di Tigran Hamasyan, A Pouting Grimace di Matt Mitchell per nominarne solo alcuni – non dovrebbe essere una sorpresa.

Una lunga intro di Steve Lehman rompe la sensazione di frenesia, ma prepara anche per un’altra battaglia ritmica in arrivo. La traccia inizia con il dialogo tra due accordi che oscillano fra di loro e un intricato riff quasi prog fino a che non si arriva al tema principale: l’accordo discendente di apertura di Spain di Chick Corea è l’unico elemento che suggerisce l’usuale standard jazz di riferimento, mentre si va avanti in una intricata interpolazione di ritmi e contrappunti. Il piano aggiunge i bassi e spesso duplica le linee corpulente della chitarra -da dire che Harrold usa un Moog nel contesto live-, mentre Lehman esplora melodie inquietanti e rabbiose. Ogni sezione del pezzo è uno studio di ritmologia di per sé: esplorano giustapposizioni, spostamenti, relazioni segrete fino a quando il filo che unisce tutto rimane appena visibile. Dux è aperta da un ritmo distorto ad opera Richard Kass che richiama un pattern cubano  – una specie di son interpretato dai Don Caballero – che il pianoforte riecheggia con il movimento in ottave parallele tipico della musica dell’isola americana. L’assolo di Richard Harrold è collegato da un filo invisibile con il resto della band, rendendo impossibile capire dove finisce la scrittura e inizia l’improvvisazione. Nei nostri live c’é una percentuale del 60% scritta e per il 40% improvvisata, dice Richard Kass, mentre Richard Harrold aggiunge: alcune sezioni hanno una sorta di struttura ritmica che in realtà ha anche degli accordi, è più una sorta di approccio tradizionale del jazz all’improvvisazione. Alcune delle altre sezioni sono simili, ma con ritmi più complicati. Abbiamo ad esempio una struttura a 12 battute con metriche che variano in concomitanza con gli accordi. È difficile capire se una sezione é improvvisata o meno. Alcuni dei pezzi hanno sezioni con una battuta intera su una ritmica precisa, c’è, invece, improvvisazione libera nelle sezioni che sono indipendenti da questi pattern ritmici.

Ora il Trio HLK sta lavorando a nuovi pezzi e nuovi standard da reinterpretare per il secondo album. E’ già pronta Anthropology di Charlie Parker: sarà “Anthropometricks” e sarà sul nostro prossimo album. È un mostro: 10 pagine di musica con due assoli! Seguire una visione chiara, un approccio diverso, lavorare a ritmo più lento e farsi influenzare trasversalmente da più parti, sembrano queste le regole fondamentali alla base del loro modo di suonare. Mentre la loro musica è un manifesto del pensiero matematico e delle pratiche di distruzione e ricostruzione musicale, nonostante tutto è piena di bellezza, istinto, improvvisazione e immediatezza, per quanto strano possa sembrare. Questo è il segreto dietro una band sembra appena aver iniziato ad esplorare il suo potenziale.

Trio HLK
Standard Time

1.Smalls (feat. Steve Lehman) 10:36
2.Extra Sensory Perception part i (feat. Evelyn Glennie) 03:50
3.Extra Sensory Perception part ii (feat. Evelyn Glennie) 06:51
4.painS part i (feat. Steve Lehman) 01:50
5.painS part ii (feat. Steve Lehman) 08:23
6.Twilt 08:37
7.Dux 08:24
8.Chewy 04:35
9.Stabvest 05:11
10.The Jig (feat. Evelyn Glennie) 08:13

Steve Lehman- Alto Sax
Evelyn Glennie- Vibraphone and Marimba
Rich Harrold- Piano
Ant Law- 8-string Guitar and effects
Richard Kass- Drums and percussion

http://www.triohlk.com

Annunci

Autore: Marcello Nardi

markellosnardoi ET yahoo DOT it

Rispondi

Inserisci i tuoi dati qui sotto o clicca su un'icona per effettuare l'accesso:

Logo WordPress.com

Stai commentando usando il tuo account WordPress.com. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Google+ photo

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Google+. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Foto Twitter

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Twitter. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Foto di Facebook

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Facebook. Chiudi sessione /  Modifica )

Connessione a %s...